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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

Series 47, No. 12-1 June 1947 

THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 
The 1946-47 Session 




ANNOUNCEMENTS OF THE 1947-48 SESSION 

MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

Published by the University 

Entered as second-class matter, July 15, 1929, at the post office at 
Morgantown, West Virginia, under the Act of August 24, 1912 

Issued Monthly 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

The West Virginia University Bulletin is issued monthly throughout the year. 
Publications included during the school year are the Announcements of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics, 
the College of Education, the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts, the Division 
of Forestry, the School of Journalism, the College of Law, the School of Medicine, 
the School of Mines, the School of Music, the College of Pharmacy, the School of 
Physical Education and Athletics, the Graduate Courses and Degrees, and the Sum- 
mer Session; the Catalogue Number; bulletins of the College of Engineering and of 
the School of Mines; miscellaneous scholarly and scientific publications; and the 
Proceedings of the West Virginia Academy of Science. 

Bequests for copies of these bulletins may be addressed to 

The Registrar 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

Morgantown, W. Va. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 
The 1946-47 Session 




ANNOUNCEMENTS OF THE 1947-48 SESSION 



June 1947 

MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

Published by the University 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendars 4 - 5 

The Governing- Board 6 

PART I— THE STAFF OF INSTRUCTION, RESEARCH, AND EXTENSION 

The Administrative Officers 7 

The Stuff of Instruction 9 

The University Rural High-school Staff 23 

The Library Staff 24 

The Agricultural Experiment Station Staff 25 

The Agricultural Extension Division Staff' 27 

The Engineering- Experiment Station Staff 28 

The Mining and Industrial Extens'on Staff 29 

The Military Staff 30 

The Athletic Staff 30 

The Athletic Council 30 

The Standing- Committees 30 

PART II— GENERAL INFORMATION 

History of the University 33 

Location 34 

The Physical Plant 35 

Funds 3'j 

Government and Organization 36 

Living Accommodations 41 

Admission to the Undergraduate Colleges and Schools 42 

Admission to the Graduate School 47 

Veterans of World War II ' 43 

Registration 49 

University Fees and Expenses 52 

Requirements for Degrees 55 

Examinations and Reports 60 

Discipline 61 

Student Welfare 64 

Physical Education and Athletics 67 

The University Health Service 69 

Employment and Placement Service 7i 

Gifts, Scholarships, and Loan Funds 72 

Pi izes, Trophies, and Medals 77 

Honor Societies 81 

Other University Organizations 83 

Publications 85 

Associated Institutions 86 

PART III— CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF 

INSTRUCTION IN THE COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics 89 

The College of Arts and Sciences 118 

The College of Education 181 

The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts and the School of Mines 193 

The Graduate School 228 

The School of Journalism 232 

The College of Law 239 

The School of Medicine 244 

The Division of Military Science and Tactics , 250 

The School of Music 251 

The College of Pharmacy 260 

The School of Physical Education and Athletics 26K 

PART IV— DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

Degrees Conferred, 1945-46- 

Baccalaureate Degrees 281 

Graduate Degrees 289 

Degrees Conferred, 1870-1946: 

Baccalaureate Degrees (table) 292 

Graduate Degrees (table) 293 

Other Degrees (table) 294 

The Classified Enrollment (table) 295 

The Geographical Distribution of Enrollment (table) 298 

Index 299 

[3] 













Ye a r 


1947 














JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M 
5 6 

12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


T W T F 


S 


s 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 3 

7 8 9 10 
14 15 16 17 
21 22 23 24 
28 29 30 31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


2 
9 

16 
23 


3 
10 

17 
2 4 


4 5 6 7 

11 12 13 14 
18 19 20 21 

25 26 27 28 


1 

8 

15 

22 


2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 31 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 

20 

27 


1 I 
21 
28 


1 2 3 

8 9 10 
15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 


4 5 

11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T \V T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


4 5 
11 12 

18 19 
25 26 


1 2 

6 7 8 9 

13 14 15 16 

20 21 22 23 

27 28 29 30 


3 
10 
17 

24 
31 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 4 5 6 
10 11 12 13 
17 18 19 20 
24 25 26 27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


12 3 

6 7 8 9 10 

13 14 15 16 17 

20 21 22 23 24 

27 28 29 30 31 


4 
11 

IS 
2 5 


5 

12 
19 
26 


3 
10 

17 
2 4 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


1 2 

8 9 

15 16 

22 23 

29 30 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 

7 8 

14 15 

21 22 

28 29 


2 3 4 5 

9 10 11 12 

16 17 18 19 
23 24 25 26 
30 


6 

13 
20 
27 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
2 
27 


12 3 

7 8 9 10 

14 15 16 17 

21 22 23 24 

28 29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 


7 
14 
21 
2S 


1 

s 

15 
22 
29 


14 
21 

2V 


1 

8 

15 

22 

20 


2 3 4 

9 10 11 

16 17 18 

23 24 25 

30 31 


5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 















Year 


1948 












JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F S 


4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


1 

6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 


2 

9 

16 

23 
30 


3 

10 

17 
24 
31 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 

16 
23 


3 4 5 6 
10 11 12 13 
17 18 19 20 
24 25 26 27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


1 2 3 

6 7 8 9 10 
13 14 15 16 17 
20 21 22 23 24 
27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


g 


M 


T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


AUGUST 


2 3 

9 10 

16 17 

23 24 

30 31 


4 5 6 
11 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


7 
14 
21 

2 s 


1 

8 

15 

2 2 

2~9 


6 
13 
20 
27 


14 
21 
28 


12 3 4 

8 9 10 11 

15 16 17 18 

22 23 24 25 

29 30 


5 
12 
l!i 
26 


1 

4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 14 15 

18 19 20 21 22 

25 26 27 28 29 


2 
9 

16 
23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


9 
16 
23 

30 


3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 

17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F S 


5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


1 2 

7 8 9 

14 15 16 

21 22 23 

28 29 30 


3 
10 

17 

24 


4 
11 

IS 
25 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

1 1 
IS 

2 5 


1 

5 6 7 8 

12 13 14 15 

19 20 21 22 

26 27 28 29 


2 
9 

16 
2 3 
30 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 


5 
12 
19 
26 


G 
13 
20 
27 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

2S 29 30 31 



The days on which the University is in session are printed in light-face 
type; Sundays, holidays, and vacations in bold-face type. 



The University Calendar* 



1947 
May 31, Saturday Alumni Day 

June 1, Sunday Baccalaureate Exercises 

June 2, Monday Commencement Day 

June 4, 5, Wednesday and Thursday Registration for Summer Session 

June 6, Friday First recitations, Summer Session 

July 4, Friday, to July 6, Sunday, inclusive Independence Day recess 

July 15, Tuesday Close of first term, Summer Session 

July 16, Wednesday Registration for second term, Summer Session 

July 17, Thursday First recitations, second term, Summer Session 

August 22, Friday Close of Summer Session 

September 11, Thursday, to September 17, Wednesday, inclusive 

Freshman Week Program 

September 13, Saturday Registration of Freshmen 

September 15, 16, and 17, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 

General registration for first semester 

September 18, Thursday First recitations, first semester 

October 14, Tuesday Meeting of University Senate 

November 10, Monday Midsemester reports due 

November 26, Wednesday, to November 30, Sunday, inclusive 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 20, Saturday, to January 4, Sunday, inclusive Christmas recess 

1948 

January 17, Saturday, to January 24, Saturday, inclusive 

Final examinations for first semester 

January 27 and 28, Tuesday and Wednesday Registration for second semester 

January 29, Thursday -First recitations, second semester 

February 10, Tuesday Meeting of University Senate 

March 22*, Monday Midsemester reports due 

March 25, Thursday, to March 31, Wednesday, inclusive Easter recess 

May 11, Tuesday Meeting of University Senate 

May 21, Friday, to May 28, Friday, inclusive 

Final examinations for second semester 

May 29, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 30, Sunday Baccalaureate Exercises 

May 31, Monday Commencement Day 



•Subject to change. 



L5] 



West Virginia University 

Morgantown 
Established February 7, 1867 

The Board of Governors 

TI'KM EXPIRES 

RAYMOND E. SALVATI, President, Huntington 19.50 

A. C. SPURR, Vice-president, Fairmont 1952 

CHARLES P. MEAD, Wheeling 1918 

MRS. GEORGE D. HILL, Camden-on-Gmley 1919 

E. G. OTEY, Bhtcfield , 1950 

THOMAS L. HARRIS, Parlersburg 1951 

K. DOUGLAS BOWERS, Beclcley 195:: 

CHARLES E. HODGES, Charleston 195 + 

WILLIAM G. THOMPSON, Montgomery 1955 

CHARLES T. NEFE, Jr., Executive Secretary, Morgantown 



The Board of Governors has charge of the educational, administrative, financial, 
and business affairs of the University and of Potomac State School of West Virginia 
University. 



PRESS OF 

MORGANTOWN PRINTING AND BINDING COMPANY 

MORGANTOWN. WEST VIRGINIA 



[6] 



Part I 
The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 



THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



General 



Irvin Stewart, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University (1946). 
Charles Thompson Neft, Jr., A.B., Vice-president of tht University and Comp- 
troller (1946), 1921. 
Edna Arnold, M.A., Dean of Wome\ 1939 r, 1910. 
•Uichard Aspinall, D.B., Ph.D., Director of Student Affairs and Director of Univer- 
sity Extension (1945!. 1936, 1930. 
v<Elmer M. Grieder, B.S.L.S., M.S., Librarian (1947). 
J. Everett Long. M.A., Registrar (1945), 1929. 

The Colleges, Schools, and Divisions 

Robert Barclay Dustman. Ph.D., Chairman of the Graduate Council (1947'. 1924. 
vFraxk Cuthbert, Mus.D., Director of the School of Music (1934 . 

AvT>PFA^_jA£K SQy Papism ax. Ph.D., Director of the Summer Sessio n (1929), 1914. ^^ 
i^fiOLAND Parker Davis. Ph.D.. Acting Dean of Engineering (1945). 1911. 
►'Thomas Porter Hardmax, J.D., Dean of the College of Laic (1931), 1913. 
►"Joseph Lester Hayman, Ph.C, M.S., Dean of the College of Pharmacy (1936), 
1919. 

Holland, B.S.E.M.. M.S.. Assistant Director of Mining and Industrial 
Extrusion (1938), 1917. 
' Walteb Allos Koehler, Ph.D., Acting Director of the Engineering Experiment 
Station (1945), 1924. 
Kl'.vard Page Lukert, Colonel, Infantry. U. S. Army, Commandant of Cadets (1945). 
^/claytox Roberts Ortox, Ph.D., Sc.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, 
and Home Economics and Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 
(1938), 1929. 
bley Isaac Reed, PhJX, .Director of the School of Journalism (1939), 1920. 
V G. Ott Romxey, M.A.. Dean of the School of Physical Education and Athletics 



- / (1946) 



Wilson Porter Shortridge, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (1929 > 
1922. 

i '■ Ti 'i' i i .in ' ^ TMPR Ov. A.B., jJ^JVai ^ merit u 9, Seh^o 1 of Medicine (1935) 
1902. ~~ 



*XOTE: Date of appointment to present position is given in parentheses after 
title; date following, if any, indicates year of first appointment to a University 

staff position. 



[7] 



v^Fi 



The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 



orrest Wilbur Stemple, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education (1945), 
1916. 
Edward Jerald Van Liere, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Medicine (1937), 
1921. 

The Council of Administration; The Senate 

For a description of the Council of Administration and of tho University Senate, 
see the section on Government and Organization, page 36. 

The Graduate Council 

Robert Barclay Dustman, Ph.D., Professor of Agriculture! Biochemistry (Chair- 
man). 
Armand Rene Collett, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Robert Cameron Colwell, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
Alexander Hardie Forman, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Forrest Wilbur Stemple, Ph.D., Professor of Education. \ 

Festus Paul Summers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
Harry Grove Wheat, Ph.D.. Professor of Education. 

Other Administrative Officers 

Mary Catherine Bayles, A.B., Assistant Registrar (1946), 1929. 

Stephen Fuller Crocker, A.B., A.M., Chairman of the Humanities Course (1943), 
1937. 

Roy M. Hawley, A.B., Director of Intercollegiate Athletics (1938), 1935. 

William H. Henderson, A.B., B.D., Executive Secretary, Young Men's Christian 
Association (1947). 

Lyle Eddy Herod, M.S., Assistant to the Registrar (1947). 

David W. Jacobs, A.B., Director, Bureau of Information (1938). 

Gerald Jenny, M.S., University Editor (1933), 1929; Director of University Broad- 
casting (1938). 

Louise Keener, B.A., Assistant to the Comptroller (1936), 1929. 

Bernard R. McGregor, B.S.Ed., Director of the University Band (1938), 1935. 

Alvin Martin Miller, B.S.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds (1945). 

Bertha Browning Purinton, A.M., Assistant Registrar Emeritus (1946), 1919. 

Ruth Eleanor Robinson, A.M., Manager, University Boole Store (1944), 1939. 

Harry Everett Stone, A.M., Secretary of Student Loans and Placement (1936), 
1922. 

Eleanor Crawford Wirth, 2 B.S., Executive Secretary, Young Women's Christian 
Association (1944). 



-'Resigned May 31, 19 4 7. 

The Student Health Service 

John Joseph Lawless, Ph.D., M.D., Director, Student Health Service (1944), 1935. 
Samuel John Morris, M.D., Physician and Attending Physician, Department of 

Athletics (1935), 1912. 
Clark Kendall Sleeth, A.B., B.S., M.D., Piiysician (1946), 1935. 
Olan Terrell Coffield, M.D., Assistant Physician (1946). 



Administration 



Fabry L. Hawk, Technician (1935), 1933. 

Albert F. Wojcik, B.S.Phar., Registered Pharmacist (1945). 

Pearl Benvenuto, R.N., Nurse (3945). 

1 iin rv K m erson, R.N., Nurse (1944). 

Lela Virginia Stump, Technician (1946). 

Clete Miller Smith, Assistant Technician (part time) (1946). 

The Residence Halls 

Maymk Elizabeth Waddell, B.S., M.A., Business Director (1935), 1930. 

BERTHA HAWLEY Allen, A.B., Social Director, Terrace JIall (1945), 1944. 

Edna Arnold, M.A., Social Director, it omen's nail, Center (1935). 

Kea Buckley, Diploma in Piano, Social Director, Women's Halt, North (1946). 

Mary Helen Burns, 1 B.A., M.A., Social Director, Women's JIall (1946). 

Pansy OLIVE Corn well, Normal Diploma, Assistant to Social Directors, Women 

JIall (1944). 
Louis D. CORSON, M.A., Faculty Resident, Men's Residence JIall (1946). 
Ann Culley Dye, B.S., Dietitian, Women's and Terrace Dining JJalls (1937). 
Evalyn Hall, B.S., Assistant Dietitian, Terrace Dining JIall 0946). 
Clara Reed Hardesty, Assistant to Social Directors, Terrace JIall (1945). 
Kathleen Mitchell, Social Director, Women's JIall, South (1942), 1940. 
MARGUERITE Marie Nearnberg, B.S., Assistant Dietitian, Women's JIall (1945). 
GrEORGANNA M. Romine, A.B., Assistant Dietitian, Men's Dining Hall (1946). 
Mabel K. Samuel, B.S., Dietitian, Men's Dining JIall (1946). 
Hazel TOWNSEND, M.A., Assistant Social Director, Terrace Ball (1946). 
Frances Lucille Twigg, B.S., Assistant Dietitian, Men's Dining Hall (1945). 



'Resigned September 1, 1946. 

THE STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 
Professors 

Albert Salisbury Abel, A.B., J.D., LL.M., Professsor of Lata (1946), 1940. 

Howard Bushnell Allen, Ph.D., Professor of Education (1932), 1920. 

Charles Henry Ambler, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Tlistory (1947), 1917. 

Walter Wardlaw Armentrout, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economies (193(5), 
1924. 

Horace ATWOOD, M.S.Agr., Professor Emeritus of Poultry husbandry (1931), 1897. 

Robert Dodge Baldwin, Ph.D., Professor of Education (1933), 1931. 

Gordon Alger Bergy, Pii.C, M.S., Professor of Pharmacy (1921), 1916. 

Lowell Besley, B.S., M.F., Professor of Forest Management (1946), 1937. 

George Paul Boomsliter, M.S.C.E., Professor of Mechanics (1920). 

Maurice Graham Brooks, M.S., Professor of Wildlife Management (1947), 1935. 

Christopher George Brouzas, Ph.D., Professor of Latin and Greek (1935), 192(5. 

James Morton Callahan, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Jlistory (1940), 1902. 

Leo Carlin, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law (1921), 1916. 

Carl Henry Catiier, M.S., Professor of Mechanics (1947), 1916. 

Harold Malcolm Cather, B.S.M.E., M.E., M.S.M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering (1945), 1919. 



10 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 



Simon B. Chandler, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy (1935). 

Oliver Perry Chitwood, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritw of History (1946), 1907. 

Friend Ebenezer Clark, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1947), 1914. 

James Irving Clower, 1 B.S.M.E., M.E., Professor of Machine Design (1945). 

Armand Rene Collett, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry (1939), 1924. 

Clyde Lemuel Colson, A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., Professor of Laic (1945), 1935. 

Rachel Hartshorn Colwell, M.A., Professor Emeritus of Home Economics and 

Education (1935), 1910. 
Robert Cameron Colwell, Ph.D., Professor of Physics (1924), 1918. 
Earl Lemley Core, Ph.D., Professor of Botany (1942), 1928. 
Stephen Fuller Crocker, 2 A.M., Professor of English (1946), 1931. 
Frank Cuthbert, Mus.D., Professor of Music (1934). 
Andrew Jackson Dadisman, Ph.D., Professor of Economics (1933), 1914. 
Arleigh Lee Darby, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of Bomance Languages (1929), 1910. 
Earl Claudius Hamilton Davies, Ph.D., Professor of Cemistry (1931), 1920. 
Hannibal Albert Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics (1947), 1921. 
Roland Parker Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Structural Engineering (1911). 
Edmund Charles Dickinson, A.B., J.D., Professor of Law (1921). 
Gideon Stanhope Dodds, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology 

(1925), 1918. 
Robert Tucker Donley, A.B., LL.B., Professor of L.aiu (1947), 1942. 
William Smith Downs, B.S.C.E., C.E., Professor (part time) of Railway and High- 
way Engineering (1935), 1931. 
John William Draper, Ph.D., Professor of English (1929). 
Robert Barclay Dustman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry (1929), 

1924. 
John Arndt Eiesland, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (193S), 1907. 
Thomas Edson Ennis, Ph.D., Professor of History (1946), 1930. 
Harvey D. Erickson, Ph.D., Professor of Forest Utilisation (1947), 1937. 
Clement Coleman Fenton, 4 M.S., M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Pathol- 
ogy (1926), 1922. 

Orfa Rex Ford, Ph.D., Professor of Physics (1943), 1925. 

Alexander Hardie Forman, M.M.E., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering 
(1916), 1913. 

Carl Maynard Frasure, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science (1940), 1927. 

Harry Marion Fridley, Ph.D., Professor of Geology (1943), 1928. 

Malcolm Curtis Gaar; 1 B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Bural Organization (1945), 
1938. 

James Herbert Gill, M.E., Professor of Machine Construction and Superintendent 
of Shops (limited service) (1940), 1920. 

Lloyd Raymond Gribble, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology (1947), 1929. 

Grace Margaret Griffin, A.M., Professor of Physical Education (1944), 1923. 

John Behny Grumbein, M.M.E., Professor Emeritus of Power Engineering (1945), 
1903. 

Arthur A. Hall, B.S.M.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering (1922), 1916. 

Thomas Porter Hardman, M.A., J.D., Professor of Law (1919), 1913. 

Thomas Luther Harris, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Sociology (1947), 1921. 



Professors 11 



Joseph Lester Hayman, Pn.C, M.S., Professor of Pharmacognosy (1936), 1019. 
Harry Oram HENDERSON, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry (1928), 1919. 

JAMES IF. HENNING, A.B., M.S., PH.D., Professor of Speech (1945). 

Hubert Hill. M.S.. Professor of Chemistry (1928), 1911. 

LAWRENCE Benjamin Htll, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education (1917), 1918. 

Wii.lakd WELLINGTON HODGE, M.A., Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering 
(1945), 1921. 

Charles T. Holland, B.S.E.M., M.S., Professor of Miming Engineering (1947), 1930. 

EARL HudelsON, Ph.D., Professor of Education (1930), 1920. 

GEORGE Hyatt, Jr., B.S., M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry (1917), 1941. 

CARL ALFRED JacoBSON, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1946), 1909. 

David Dale Johnson, A.M., Litt.D., Professor Emeritus of English (1946), 1902. 

Edwin Channing Jones, M.S.E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering (1947), 1926. 

Walter Allos Koetiler, Ch.E., Ph.D., Professor of Chemical and Ceramic Engineer- 
ing (1929), 1924. 

Charles Lester Lazzell, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry (1946), 1922. 

Julian Gilbert Leach, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology (1938). 

Edward Alexander Livesay, D.Sc, Professor of Animal Husbandry (1919). 

Alfred Delbert Longhouse, B.S., M.S., Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
(1945), 1938. 

Edward Page Lukert. Colonel. Infantry, Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
(1945). 

Perctyal Lloyd MacLactilan, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry (1943), 1936. 

David Fielding Marsh, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology (1947), 1944. 

Ray Stanley Marsh. M.A., Professor of Horticulture (1936). 

James H. C. Martens, 6 Ph.D., Professor of Geology (1943), 1929. 

Fred A. Molby, Ph.D., Professor of Physics (1921), 1920. 

Samuel Morris, 5 Ph.D.. Professor of Chemistry (1921), 1916. 

Samuel John Morris, M.D., Professor of Physical Education (1935), 1912. 

Ruth Douglas Xoer, M.S., Professor of Home Economics (1938), 1925. 

Dickson Ward Parsons, Ph.D., Professor of Sural Organization (1939 s ), 1923. 

Leonard Marion Peairs, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology (1914), 1911. 

W. Clement Perceval, Ph.D., Professor of Forestry (1939), 1934. 

George Gordon Pohlman, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy (1938), 1930. 

Rebecca Luella Pollock, Ph.D., Professor of Education (1928), 1916. 

Perley Isaac Reed, Ph.D., Professor of Journalism (1927), 1920. 

Albert Moore Reese, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Zoology (1946), 1907. 

Clarence Newton Reynolds, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics (1931), 1921. 

John Harrison Rietz, D.V.M., M.S., Professor Emeritus of Animal Pathology 
(1947), 1927. 

G. Our Bomney, M.A., Professor of Physical Education (1946). 

David Salkin, M.D., Professor of Medicine (Hopemont) (1946), 1936. 

Burch Hart Schneider, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry (1945), 
1938. 

Wilson Porter Shortridge, Ph.D., Professor of History (1922). 

Howard Perry- Simons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering (1947), 1939. 

Fred Manning Smith, Ph.D., Professor of English (1939), 1927. 



12 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

Robert Clifton Spangler, Ph.D., Professor of Botany (1926), 1914. 

Henry Withers Speiden, M.S.C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering (1941), 1931. 

Claude Carl Spiker, Ph.D., Professor of French and Spanish (1926), 1913. 

Kobb Spaulding Spray, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Bacteriology and Public 
Hygiene (1946), 1921. 

Elizabeth Mattingly Stalnaker, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology (1928), 1925. 

Madison Stathers, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages (1910), 1906. 

Forrest Wilbur Stemple, Ph.D., Professor of Education (1931), 1916. 

Perry Daniel Strausbaugh, Ph.D., Professor of Botany (1923). 

Festus Paul Summers, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of History (1946), 1932. 

Emil McKee Sunley, Ph.D., Professor of Public Welfare (1938). 

Leland Hart Taylor, Sc.D., Professor of Zoology (1939), 1922. 

Charles Danser Thomas, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Physics (1947), 1931. 

Ralph B. Tower, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration (1941). 

Bird Margaret Turner, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1947), 1923. 

Edward Jerald Van Liere, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology (1921). 

Charles Henry Vehse, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics (1947), 1929. 

Enoch Howard Vickers, A.M., Professor Emeritus of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration (1938), 1911. 

Randolph Wyatt Webster, 7 Ph.D., Professor of Physical Education (1945), 1940. 

Kyle Chester Westover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture (1945), 1921. 

Harry Grove W t heat, Ph.D., Professor of Education (1935). 

Bennett Sexton White, B.S., M.E., Professor Emeritus of Drawing and Machine 
Design (1946), 1919. 

Charles Vinyard Wilson, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry (1946), 1919. 

John E. Winter, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology (1923), 1921. 



1 Resigned September 15, 1946. 

2 On leave of absence, September 1, 1946, to January 15, 1947. 

3 Resigned August 31, 1946. 

^Deceased May 28, 1947. 

-Deceased March 20, 1947. 

«Resigned May 31, 1947. 

7 Resig-ned January 15, 1947. 

Associate Professors 

Nellie Perrel AMMONS, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany (1945), 
1920. 

Berth, Gottfried Anderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology (1945), 1942. 

Robert Russell Asiiburn, A.M., Associate Professor of Spanish (1944), 1925. 

Wilfred Harmon Baker, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing (1945), 1941. 

Horace Leslie Barnett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mycology (1945). 

Carter Richard Bishop, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English (1945), 1929. 

Robert Howell Black, M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry (li>47), 
1940. 

Reed H. Bradford, 1 M.A., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics (1946), 
1942. 

James Paul Brawner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English (1945), 1935. 



Associate Professors 13 



RALPH Cumins BRIGGS, \kM., MM., Associate Professor of Music (1946). 
JOSEPH Lincoln Cartledge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics (194.'!), 1936. 
LOUIS Watson Chappell, A.M., Associate Professor of English (1928), 1923. 
William R. Chepsey, 2 E.M., Associate Professor of Mining Engineering (1946). 
William Henry Childs, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture (1944), 1931. 
George Clark, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy (1947). 
Tiki mas Raird Clark, R.S.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

(1946). 
James Harris Clarke, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics (1947), 

1939. 
Arthur R. Colmer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology (1945). 
Kermit A. Cook. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education (1947), 1935. 
John Reginald Cresswell." Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy (1941), 1929. 
Quin Fischer Curtis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology (1943), 1941. 
Lily Bell Deatrick/ Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1946). 

1921. 
JASON Clark EastON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History (1943), 1938. 
Marja Steadman Fear, 5 M.A., Associate Professor of Speech (1945), 1920. 
Frederick Linck Geiler, B.S.Phar., M.S., Associate Professor of Pharmacy (1943), 

1928. 
John A. Gibson, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry (1945), 1926. 
George Walter Grow, B.S.M.E., M.S., Associate Professor of Drawing and Machine 

Design (1945), 1912. 
Charles Wickline Hill, B.S.Agr., Associate Professor of Bural Organization 

(1946), 1937. 
Lydia Irene Hinkel, Mus.B., Associate Professor of Music (1939), 1921. 
Torkel Holsoe, M.F., Associate Professor of Silviculture (1946), 1938. 
Harold Marteney Hyre, M.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry (1944), 

1931. 
Benjamin Keen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History (1946). 
Forrest Elwood Keller, 2 M.A., Associate Professor of Economics (1941), 1936. 
John Joseph Lawless, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine (1944), 1935. 
Marlyn Edward Lugar, 3 A.B., LL.B., Associate Professor of Law (1947), 1939. 
Warren Francis Manning, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of French (1945), 

1928. 
Elmer Mayse Million, x\.B., LL.B., J.S.D., Associate Professor of Laiv (1946). 
William Sherman Minor, A.B., D.B., Associate Professor of Philosophy (1946). 
Charles Mitrani, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Iiomance Languages (1931), 1921. 
Nell Nesbitt, A.M., Associate Professor Emeritus of Home Economics (1946), 1923. 
David W. Northup, A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology (1938), 1935. 
Charles Edwin Patton, A.M., Associate Professor of Art (1941), 1939. 
James Irving Reynolds, B.S.M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

(1947), 1942. 
Evan Owen Roberts, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration (1945), 1939. 
Ira Errett Rodgers, A.B., Associate Professor of Physical Education (1945), 1920. 
Jacob Saposnekow, M.A., Associate Professor of Sociology (1941), 1924. 



14 THE STAFF OF INSTRUCTION, RESEARCH, AND EXTENSION 

Charles Borum Seibert, B.S.E.E., M.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing (1944), 1934. 

Peter David Shilland, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics (1946). 

John Madison Slack, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology and 
Public Hygiene (1946). 

Clark Kendall Sleetti, A. P., B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis 
and Medicine (1946), 1935. 

Joseph K. Stewart, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics (1946), 1930. 

Albert Lee Sturm, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science 
(1946). 

Richard Huyette Sudds, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulturt 
(1946). 

Carlton Fulton Taylor, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology (1945). 
1938. 

George E. Tobex, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics (1946). 

Patrick Anthony Tork, M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education (1947), 
1943. 

Edward Hexry Tyxer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agronomy (1943), 1938. 

Collixs Veatcii, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics (1945). 

Adolph James Weiser, 2 Mus.B., Mus.M., Associate Professor of Music (1944). 

Dana Wells, M.A., Associate Professor of Geology (1945), 1930. 

Ralph H. Wherry, 7 A.B.. M.A., C.L U., Associate Professor of Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration (1945), 1940. 

Hexry W. Woolard, B.S.E.(Aero), Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineer- 
ing (1947), 1946. 

Kexxeth Wood, Mus.M., Associate Professor of Violin and Ensemble (1941), 1928. 



'Resigned September 30. 1946 

-'Resigned August 31, 1946. 

3 On leave of absence, September 1, 1946, to January 15, 1947. 

♦Deceased November 25, 19 46 

r> On leave of absence, 1947-48. 

"Resig-ned May 31, 1947. 

T Resig-ned August 31, Li» i 7 . 

Assistant Professors 

Richard Atkins Ackerman, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

(1946), 1928. 
Orval James Axdersox, A.M., Assistant Professor of English (1947), 1941. 
Ford Lewis Battles, A. P., A.M., Assistant Professor of English (P945), 1940. 
William Derrick Barxs, A.B., A.M., Assistant Professor of History (1947), 1940. 
Kexxeth Bell, B.J., M.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism (1944). 
Kermit B. Blaxey, B.S.Agr., Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

(1946). 
James Karl Bletner, B.S., Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry (1946), 1935. 
Samuel Boyd, Jr., B.D.A., Assistant Professor of Speech (1946), 1943. 
Walter Marion Broadfoot, 1 Assistant Professor of Agronomy and Genetics (1946), 

1936. 
Clifford W. Brown, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Music (1947), 1942. 
Sara Axx Browx, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education 

(1946). 



Assistant Professors 15 



J. NED Bryan, Jr., M.A.. Assistant Professor of Physics (1946), 1936. 

Jack B. Byers, B.S., Assistant Professor of Forest Utilization (1946), 1941. 

JOHN D. Carter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History (1947). 

Genevieve Bernice Clulo, A.M.. Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology (1943), 

1932. 
Margaret Buchanan Cole, A. P., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1942), 

1938. 
George Hexry Colebank, M.A.. Assistant Professor of Education (192S). 
Ralph William Conrad, A. P., Assistant Professor of Physics (1946). 
Raymond Dean Cool,- Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1946). 
Allen Byron CUNNINGHAM, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1946), 

1935. 
Montelle Dietrich, M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics (1941), 1929. 
R. Franklin Dugan, M.F.. Assistant Professor of Wildlife Management (1943), 

1942. 
Arthur Pingree Dye, B.S., M.S.Agr., Assistant Professor of Horticulture (1941), 

1923. 
Roy E. Emerson, B.S.. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering (1946), 

1940. 
Clyde Neville English, B.A., M.S.M., Assistant Professor of Music (1945). 
Margaret Erlangee, 3 M.A.. M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education, (1946), 

1937. 
James W. Evans, Jr.. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics (1947). 
Harold V. Fairbanks. M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering (1947). 
Ruel E. Foster, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English (1946), 1942. 
Thompson R. Fulton, M.A., Assistant Professor of Social Work (1946). 
Patrick Ward Gainer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English (1946). 
.Tames L. Hall, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1946). 
George W. Hawkins, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics (1946). 
Lvdia Irene Hinkel, Mus.B., Assistant Professor of Education (1939), 1921. 
Margaret E. Hoffmann, A.B.. M.A.. Assistant Professor of Public Welfare (1944), 

1943. 
JOHN Heywood Holden, B.S.CH.E., M.S.Cii.E.. Assistant Professor of Chemical 

Engineering (1945). 
Helen Rose Holland, A.B., B.M., Mus.M., Assistant Professor of Music l!t45i, 

1940. 
Beatrice Hurst. M.A.. Assistant Professor of Physical. Education (1935), 192S. 
Paul R. Jones, M.S. in Ceramics, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

(1947), 1946. 
Joseph L. Knapp, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry (1947). 
Harold Xeely Kerr, A.B., M.Lltt., Assistant Professor of Sociology (1947), 1946. 
Joseph W. Kohnstamm, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Taciics (1947). 
Edwin Donaldson Koons, 4 Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology (1946). 
Victor Jacob Lemke, A.B., A.M.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German (1941), 

1939. 
John Charles Ludlum, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology (1946). 
Arthur Cook McBride, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of French (1941), 1926. 



16 Tin. Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extens 

James R. MacDonalp. 1 PhJX, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering (1943). 
Bernard R. Mi Gregor, B.S.Ep.. Assistant Professor of Music 1946). 
Abraham STANLEY MARGOLIN, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Biolo,, . 1936. 

Tom L. Marshall. B.S.Agr., Assistant Professor of Military Sciena and Taeties 

(1946). 
George Ralph Maxwell, B.S.. M.D.. Assistant Professor (part time) of Physical 

Diagnosis (1936), 1921. 
Kenneth Holden Murphy, A.B., M.S.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1947), 

1939. 
Oliver Meader Neal, B.s.. Assistant Professor of Horticulture (1947), 1942. 
George Norrie, Jr., Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics (1946). 
Mary Xapine Page. M.A.. Assistant Professor of English 1946 . 1925. 
Beth Mae Palmer. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Home Economics 1927 . 
Jeanne Paris, M.A., Assistant Professor of Home Economics (1946), 1945. 
Iland Dee Peters. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics I 1947 . 1941. 
Helen Purinton Pettigee 1 ^. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Enali.sl* L941 . 1919. 
Ward F. Porter. Jr., A.B.. Assistant Proftssor of Agricultural Economics (1947 . 
Blanche E. Price. M.A., Assistant Professor of IJome Economics (1945). 
Cecil Benjamin Pride. A.B., M.D.. Assistant Professor (part time) of Surgery 

1936), 192«'. 
Alston Lee Reed, B.S.E.E.. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering (1946). 
Elizabeth Frost Reed. A.M.. Assistant Professor of English (1945), 1919. 
FLORENCE K. Reese. A.B.. M.A., B.S. Ltbr. Seey.. Assistant Professor of Library 

1946). 1935. 
DONALD Dirk Ritchie, A.B., B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Biology (1946), 1938. 
Lydia Roesch, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of German (1935 >. 1925. 
Dayid Salkin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Surgery (1943 . 1936. 
Greek Sayre, M.A.. Assistant Professor of English (1941). 1913. 
John Semon. B.S.P.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Eduction (1947), 

1943. 
Frank Willarp Schali.ee. B.s.. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Agronomy (1946), 

1937. 
Aemand Edwards Singer, A.B.. A.M., Ph.D.. Assistant Prof<ssrT of Eomance Lan- 
guages (1947), 1940. 
Arthur Xewell Smith, A.B., Assistant Professor of Pliysic<!l Education (1931), 

192M. 
Sara R. Smith, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of History (1947). 1946. 
Vivian Sorei.le. A.B.. M.A.. Assistant Professor of Journalism (1944), 1943. 
John Clifford Stickney. B.s.. M.S.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiotogy 

(1945), 1940. 
Kakina ThurE, 8 M.S.. Assistant Professor of name Economics (1945). 1943. 
Wilbur Jones Tyler, B.s.. M.S.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

(1947). 1945. 
Earl Haven Tryon, B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Silviculture (1945 . 
John R. Vaughn." BrS.. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology (1945 >. 1941. 
Marvin Lewis Vest, M.S., Assistant Professor or Mathematics (1943), 1931. 
Franklin George Wade, A.B., B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology (1946,. 



I irs 17 



Bamuh Josephus Weese, B.S., M.A.. Assistant . ■ „ Husbandry 

(1945). 
Edwin .1. White, Jr., mt Professor of Military 8tienct and Tactics | 1946). 

Frederick Rendell Whittlesey, AID., Assistant Professor (part time) of Medicine 

(1942), 1930. 
Thomas Wallet Williams. B.S., M.S.. PhD., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and 

Histology (1944). 
•Douglas B. Williamson. B.A., M.A.. Assistant Professor of Physics (1946 
Donald Thompson Worrell, B.SJEJE . M.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

(1946), 1941. 



'Resigned September 15, 1946. 

•Resigned September 1. 1946. 

■On leave of absence, September 1. 1946, to January 15 1947 

'Resigned January 15, 1047. 

^Resigned April 30, 1947. 

Instructors 
Lillian Allen. M.A.. Instructor in English 1947 l, 1946. 
Evelyn Anderson, M.A.. Instructor in Speech (1947). 
K. Stuart Armstrong. M.A., Instructor in English (1946). 
Jo Mather Aull. Instructor (port time) in Art (1945). 
John F.. Bailey.- B.S.E.E.. Instructor in Physics (1946). 

Walter W. Baker. B.S.Cii.E.. Instructor in Chemical Engineering <1947 . 1946. 
W. Hughes Barnes. M.A.. Instructor in Extension (1946). 
Edward Peter Bartkus. B.S.Cn.E., Instructor i„ Chemical Engineering (1947), 

L<45. 
1 ranges Isabel Bason." B.S.. / ri tor in Physical Education (1944 
Lloyd Edward Beyins. A.B.. M.A.. Instructor in English (1946). 
Gertrude Clark Blackwood, B.S., Instructor in Psychology (1947), 1945. 
Edytue Blumert. B.S.. M.A.. Instructor in English (1946). 
Sallie Shrewsbury Board. A.B.. A.M., Instructor in English (1945). 
DONOVAN Hixer Bond. B.S.J. . Instructor in Journalism (1946). 
Thomas J. Brennan, B.S.Ed., Instructor in Education (1947\ 1941. 
Irene Vaughn Brissey. 1 Instructor in Botany and Zoology (1946). 
Teresa Marie Broderick, A.M.. Instructor in English (1946). 
Jerry Cameron Burciiinal. B.S C.E.. Instructor in Civil Engineering (1946). 
Russell Clarke Butler. B.S.Agr.. M.S.. Instructor in Education (1944 . 
William John Carl. Instructor in. Eoundry Practice and Pipe Pitting (limited 

service | | 1943 (. 1920. 
Elizabeth W. Carroll. 1 ' A.B.. A.M.. Instructor in English (1945). 
Berenice Coe, 1 - A.B.. M.A.. Instructor in English (1946). 
Olive W. Coferoth. ;! M.A.. Instructor (part time) in Englisli (1946). 
Lucy May CoplinV A.M.. Instructor in Education (1931), 1925. 
Hazel Ruth Coutts. M.A.. I >' otor in Business Adn.inistration (19A:\ . 
Tyreeca Davis, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics (1946). 
Arthur Paul Davisson. B.S.. A.B.. M.S., Instructor in Biology (1946). 
Oreta Holbert Dawson, A.B.. Instructor in English (L>47>, 1946. 
H. Martin DeTi~rk." B.S. I.E.. Instructor in Machine Drawing and Design (1941). 
David William Dowdell, A.B.. Instructor in English (1947), 1946. 



18 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 



John Dixon Downes, Jr., B.S.Agr., Instructor in Horticulture H943). 

Carl Ray Duncan, 6 B.S.C.E., Instructor (part time) in Civil Engineering (1945). 

Donald W. Eicher, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Education and Physical Education 
(1946), 1942. 

John Thomas Evans, 7 A.B., B.Mus., M.Mrs., Instructor (part time) in Instrument 
Classes (1943). 

Stanley Farr, B.S., Instructor in Physics (1947). , 

George Andrew Federer, Jr.. M.A., Instructor in Education (1934), 1928. 

HOMER FiZER, B.S.P.E., Instructor in Physical Education (1947), 1940. 

Virginia Shewey Flanigan, 13 B.A., M.A., Instructor in Social Science (1946). 

Isabelle T. Gadzikowsky, M.D., Instructor in Medicine (Hopemont) (1946). 

Thelma T. Oilman, 7 M.A., Instructor in Psychology and Philosophy (1945). 

Elizabeth Alice Goodall, B.S., Instructor in Extension (1945). 

Ralph Horace Green, 6 B.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Enaineering (1945). 

Enid Verona Haller, 10 A.B., Instructor in Speech (1946), 1945. 

Margaret G. Hartson, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Howe Economics (1946). 

Ruth Wheeler Hatfield, A.B., A.M., Instructor in English (1944). 

George S. Henry, Flight Instructor (1944). 

Frank Herrera y Sanchez, A.M., Instructor in Spanish (1946). 

James Blake Hickman, B.S.Ciiem., M.S., Instructor in Chemistry (1946), 1941. 

Irvin Edward Howell, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education (1947). 

Thomas William Howard, B.S.E.M., Instructor in Mining Engineering (1946). 

Oliver Ikenberry, Ph.D., Instructor in Extension (1946). 

Carl E. Johnson, M.D., Instructor (part time) in Medicine (1941). 

Lloyd Everett Jones, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1946), 1937. 

Loyal H. Jones, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Biology (1946). 

Mary Rose Jones, 1 B.S., Instructor (part time) in Home Economics (1946), 1941. 

James Albert Kapnicky, 1 B.S.Ch.E., Instructor (part time) in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing (1946). 

Everett Lee Keener, B.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1946). 

William Franklin Kern, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education (1943). 

Nicholas Kobzareff, B.S., S.T.D., Instructor in Slavonic Languages (1944). 

Jean Bauman Lambert, B.S., Instructor in Speech (1946). 

William S. Lennonv M.A., Instructor in Economics and Business Administration 
(1946), 1941. 

Charles Lewis, 5 A.B., M.S., Instructor in Bacteriology (1943). 

William Allan Lunk, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Zoology (1946). 

Gertrude McAllister, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics (1945). 



'Resigned May 31, 1946. 
-Resigned January 15, 1947. 
^Resigned January 21, 1946. 
On leave of absence, 1946-47. 
■"•Resigned September 1, 1946. 
"Resigned November 3d, L945. 
'Resigned January 31. 1946. 
11 Re signed May 31, 1947; 
10 Resigned April 5, 1947. 
'-'Resigned April 30, 1947. 
"Resigned August 31, 1947. 



Instructors 19 



KATHLEEN McGillicuddy, 6 M.S., Instructor in Home Economics and Assistant Teach- 
er Trainer (1945). 
Virginia Chrisman McWhorter, 9 Instructor in Music (1940), 1935. 
Mavis Manx, M.A., Acting Instructor in Political Science (1947). 
Glenn Fayette Martin, Instructor in Machine Shop and Welding Practice (1940). 
Minnie Jane Merrells, Ph.D., Extension Instructor in English (1946). 
Webster Earl Miller, M.A., Instructor in Chemistry (1946). 
William E. Mockler, M.A., Instructor in English (1946). 
Mary S. Montgomery, M.A., Instructor in English (1947). 
Susan Maxwell Moore, A.B., Instructor Emeritus in Piano and Sight Playing 

(1937), 1903. 
Augusta Marie O 'Donald Morgan, A.B., M.A., Instructor in English (1946). 
.Tames Sidney Murphy, B.S.Ae.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1946). 
Velda Xoland, 3 M.A., Instructor (part time) in English (1946). 
Ruth Maxwell Palmer. B.S.H.E., M.S., Instructor in Home Economics (1947), 

1945. 
Lee Patton, Instructor in Physical Education (1945). 

William P. Pierce, 9 B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1946). 
Peter Popoyich, M.S., Instructor in Chemistry (1946). 
James Stanley Poundstone. Instructor in Mining Extension (1924). 
Robert J. Prendeville, 9 B.A., M.A., Instructor in Speech (1946). 
Aaron H. Rapking, Jr., M.S., Instructor in Education (1947), 1946. 
Harvey - X. Rexroad, Jr., B.S.E.E., Instructor in Physics (1947). 
Emma Jane Rhodes, B.M. in Piano, M.M., Instructor in Music (1946), 1942. 
Fred Smith Robie, 9 B.A., Instructor in Speech (1946). 
Garnet Jamison Rogers, M.A., Instructor in Education (1940). 
Charles A. Ross, 9 M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology (1946). 

William Robert Ross, A.B., M.A., 2 Instructor in Political Science (1941), 1938. 
P;rnest James Sandy, B.S.E.M.. Instructor in Mining Engineering (1946). 
Morton Santymire, B.S., Instructor in Physical Science (1946). 
Raymer Egbert Seaman, Instructor Emeritus in Woodworking and Foundry Practice 

(1945), 1912. 
Elizabeth Sheppard, B.A., Instructor in Speech (1946). 
Mary Irene Shively, 9 B.M., Instructor (part time) in Music (1945). 
Allen Simmons, 8 B.S.C.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering (1945). 
Grace Martin-Snee, B.M., Instructor Emeritus in Piano and Pipe Organ (1945), 

1898. 
Sylvia Josephine Soupart, M.A., Instructor Emeritus in Education (1945), 1925. 
JOHN Albert Southern, 3 Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry (1946). 
Bernard J. Sparlin, 6 B.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1945). 
Harry H. Stephens, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering and Mechanics (1946), 

194::. 
June Metz Thorn, B.S.P.E., Instructor in Physical Education (1945). 
Rebecca Wade, A.M., Instructor in Bomanoe languages (1945). 
Jack Wayne Warfield, B.A., M.A.," Instructor in Speech (1946). 
Wni 1 am Albert Wasemaxx, 11 B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

(1946). 



-«» The Staff of [nstruction, Research, and Extend 



DOROTHY Marie Watson, M.A., Instructor mi Education (1947), 1943. 

John Raymond Webb, M.S., Instructor in Agronomy (1947), 1941. 

Lois Bedford Wellen, B.S., M.S., Instructor in Home Economics (1946). 

RUFUS Asa West, Instructor in Metal-worhing {limited service) (1933), 1892. 

Charity White, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education and Athletics (1946), 1945. 

Ralph M. White, A.B., LL.B., Instructor in Political Science (1945), 1910. 

May Landstreet Wilt, M.A., Instructor in Education (1931), 1924. 

Richard Henry Wilt, A.B., Instructor in Art (1946). 

Albert Freddie Wojcik, B.S.Phar., Instructor in Pharmacy (1945). 

Charles Peter Yost, B.S.P.E., Instructor in English (1946). 



2 Resigned January 15, 1 047. 
^Resigned January 21. 1946. 
•"Resig/ned September 1, 1946. 
e Resigned November 30, 1945. 
s Resigned Docembor 31, 1945. 
^Resigned May 31, 1947. 
"Resigned August 31, 194 7. 



Lecturers 



George R. Farmer, LL.B., Lecturer in Business Law (1946). 

Keith Gerchow, M.D., Lecturer in Social Work (1946). 

John Helmick, M.D., Lecturer in Social Work (1946). 

Carl E. Johnson, M.D., Lecturer in Social Work (1942). 

M. F. Kirsch, C.P.A., Lecturer in Accounting (1946). 

Oscar Doane Lambert, Ph.D., Lecturer in History (1946), 1945. 

C. H. Layman, D.D.S., Lecturer in Social Work (1945). 

Virgil Greene Lily, 1 Ph.D., Lecturer in Chemistry (1946). 

Justus Pickett, M.D., Lecturer in Social Work (1945). 

Harry V. Thomas, M.D., Lecturer in Social Work (1942). 

Eldon Bryant Tucker, M.D., L,ecturer in Anesthesiology (1937). 



'September 15, 1946, to January 15, 1947. 

Fellows, Assistants, and Technicians* 

Helen Louise Ambler, B.S., Teaching Eellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Liberty Marian Antalis, A.B., Teaching Eelloiv in English (1946). 

Mary Rogers Ashburn, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Harry Phillip Baiirick, B.A., Teaching Felloiv in German (1946). 

James David Bailey, B.S., Teaching Felloiv in Economics and Business Administra- 
tion (1946). 

Eleanor Elizabeth Barnard, B.S., Teaching Felloiv in Economics and Business 
Administration (1946). 

Elizabeth Ann Bartholomew, A.B., Herbarium Assistant (1941), 1938. 

*For additional names see the sections on "Other Administrative Officers/' 
"Student Health Service,'' "Agricultural Experiment Station Staff," and "Mining 
and Industrial Extension Staff." 



Fellows, Assistants, and Technicians 21 

Dais^ Walters Bell, B.S., Teaching Fellow in English | L946). 

Elizabeth Thompson- Beyer, A..B., Teaching Fellow in English (1947). 

Agnes Blake, B.S., Research Assistant (pari tima \ in Plant Pathology and Bar- 

U riology ( 1!»46 ). 

Wilbur Harris Bum, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

William Franklin Boldbjdge, B.S., M.S., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry (1946). 

Thomas Mi n\ Bole, Jr.. A.B., Teaching Fellow in English I 1946). 

Marian Wilson Bbannan, A.B.. M.A.. Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Mary Susan Brown. B.S., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Ralph Clinton Brown, Jr., B.S., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Russell Woodrow Castle, A..B., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Admin- 
istration (194(3). 

Louise Livingston Chapman, B.S., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Dorothy M. Collett, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry | L947). 

Robert A. Crichton, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Administra- 
tion (1947). 

Earl Hicks Crisler, B.S.Cii., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Max Wayne Carl Cubbon, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Abel F. DeWitt, B.S.Ed., Graduate Assistant in Education (1946). 

Wintiirop Cecil Difford, B.S.. Teaching Fellow in Geology (1946). 

William A. Dilgard, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History (1940). 

Marjorie Smith Durling, B.S., Teaching Fellow in English (l<)4<h. 

Ruth Eskew, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Stanford Fertig, B.S.Agr., Graduatt Assistant in Agronomy and Genetics (1946). 

John P. Foley, B.S., Gradual' Assistant in School of Physical Education and 
Athletics (1946). 

Eleanor Ford, B.S., M.S., Teaching Fellow in Physics (1947). 

Carol Leyman French, B.A., Teaching Fellow in Englisli (1946). 

Emma Jane Freshwater, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Admin- 
istration (1946). 

Mary Gibson, B.S.Ed., Research Assistant in Plant Pathology (1946). 

Earl Goodwin, B.S., Teaching Eellou- in Economies and Business Administration 
(1947). 

Helen McCue Goodykoontz, B.S., Graduate Assistant in Tlome Economics (1946). 

Janis Gover, A.B., Assistant (part time) in Biochemistry (1946). 

Robert Paul Haden, B.S.Ch.E., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Betty Snyder Hall, A.B., Teaching Eellou: in Speech (1946). 

Martha Woofter Hall, B.S., Teaching Eellou- in Englisli (1946). 

Phyllis Hamilton, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Psychology (194(5), 1945. 

Susan C Harnish, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Dora Lee Harris, B.S.Cii., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Helen Maxine Heater, A.B.. Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (194(5). 

Ethel Shreffler Heebixk, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Mary Betty Parker Herrera, A.B., M.A., Teaching Fellow in 'Romance Languages 
(1946). 

Helen Hess, A.B., Assistant (pari lime) in Anatomy (1946). 



22 The Staff of Enstruction, Research, and Extension 



David Best Hoi. dfx, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Administra- 
tion (1946). 
B. R. Hoxfckfi;, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Economies and Business Administration 

(1947). 

James Robert Huntsberger, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry (1946). 

Kenneth Johnston, B.S.Agr., Graduate Ass, stent in Dairy Husbandry (1946). 

Jacqueline Hood Jones, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Psychology (1946). 

Marjorie Jones, A.B., Teaching Fellow vn Romance Languages (1947). 

Forrest E. Justis, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Margaret McNemar King, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Elizabeth Lang, B.S., Graduate Assistant in School of Physical Education and 
Athletics (1946). 

Lydia S. Lemke, B.A., Teaching Fellow in German (1946). 

Barbara Leigh Lemley, A.B., Teaching Felloiv in English (1946). 

Lucy W. Lowry, Diploma, Assistant in Music (1946). 

Marguerite MoBride, Teaching Fellow in Bomance Languages (1947). 

Kathryn Belle McGee, B.S., Assistant in Biochemistry (1946). 

Blanche Jean McQuiston, A.B., M.A., Teaching Fellow in Physics (1946). 

Agnes Mary Minor, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Clayton Montgomery, Jr., B.A., M.A., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Zella Mae Moore, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1945). 

Allen E. Murphy, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Geology (1947). 

Ralph Thomas Myers, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry (1946). 

Rebecca Nay Narick, B.S., M.L., Teaching Fellow in Psychology (1946). 

Elizabeth Walton Nash, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Speech (1946). 

John Frederick Ollom, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Virginia Taylor Perry, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

Robert W. Pitts, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in Animal Husbandry (1946). 

William Randall, A.B.Ed., Assistant in School of Music (1946). 

Henry Elton Reed, B.S.Ch.E., Graduate Assistant in Chemical Engineering (1946). 

Robert F. Riggs, B.S. Electronics Eng., Teaching Fellow in Physics (1946). 

Fred E. Ross, A.B., M.S., Teaching Fellow in Biology (1946). 

Charles Michael Runner, Stationary Engineer and Laboratory Assistant in Mechan- 
ical Engineering (1945), 1919. 

Ethel Ruth Seligman, B.A., M.A., Teaching Fellow in Bomance Languages (1946) ; 

Macie Lilly Shugkou, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 

.Mai;y M. SHURTLEFP, A.B., A.M., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

Mary White Singer, Ph.D., Teaching Fellow in Classics (1946). 

Genevieve Poland Smell, A.B., M.A., Teaching Felloiv in Biology (1946). 

Gene Hope Smith, A.B., M.S., Teaching Fellow in Zoology (1946). 

Joseph P. Sollars, B.S.Ed., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration (1946). 

Blanche Stonestreet, M.A., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

William H. Strader, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in Horticulture (1946). 

Robert E. Strosxidfr, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy and Genetics 
(1946). 

Virginia Butts Sturm, A.B., M.A., Teaching Fellow in English (1946). 



The University Bubal High School Staff 2°, 



Jani Stewart Taylor, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration (1946 i. 
L. Wayne Thorne, B.S., GraduaU Assistant in School of Physical Education and 

At I, J, tics ( L946). 

Ellen Zink Vandervort, A.B., M.S., Teaching Felloto in Biology (1946). 

Charms Ernest Walls, Laboratory Assistant end Mechanician in domical Engi- 
neering (1945), 1938. 

JACK Wayne Warpleld, B.A., M.A.. Assistant in Badio (1946). 

Carrie Cantrall Waters, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Psychology (1945). 

Marcel Weinrich, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics (1946). 

.'ames R. WELSHONCE, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Economics and Business Administra- 
tion (1947). 

Merle E. Williams. A.B., Teaching Fellow in English (1947). 

Benjamin James Wilson, B.S., Assistant (part time) in Bacteriology (1946). 

Henry Wood, B.S., Research Fellow in Chemistry (1947). 

Milla Elizabeth Young, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Eomance Languages (1946). 

THE UNIVERSITY RURAL HIGH SCHOOL STAFF 

George Henry Colebank. M.A.. Principal (1928). 

Ella Louise Boggess, M.A., Vocational Home Economics (1937), 1928. 

Thomas J. Brennan, B.S.Ed., Industrial Arts (1946), 1941. 

Anna Brochick, M.A., English (1939), 1938. 

Clifford W. Brown. M.A., Music (1945). 

Russell Clark Butler, M.S., Vocational Agriculture (1944). 

Mary Jane Carrico, B.S.H.E., Home Economics (1946). 

Lucy M. Coplin. 1 M.A.. Social Studies (1931), 1925. 

James Frederick Davis,- M.S., Science (1935). 

Catlierine McKelvey Dorsey, A.B., Mathematics (1943). 

Donald Wayne Eicher, M.S., Physical Education (1943). 

George A. Federer, Jr., M.A., Science (1934), 1928. 

Homer Fizer, B.S.F.E., Physical Education (1940). 

Elizabeth Gates, M.A., Social Studies (1943). 

Lilyan King Galbraith, 2 M.A., Home Economics (1944). 

Marie Louise Meyer, M.A., Physical Education (1944). 

Victoria K. Radford, 3 A.B., English (1945). 

Aaron H. Rapking. Jr., M.S., Science (1946). 

Garnet Jamison Rogers, M.A., English | 1940). 

Kate Meredith Roller, M.A., Ait (1927). 

Mary Alice Semon, M.A., Junior High School Teacher (1943), 1938. 

Bette Hall Shahan, B.S.Ed., Library (1945). 

Madalexe E. Smith, M.A., Commerce (1910). 

Bernice L. Smrek, M.A., English (1945). 

Sylvia Josephine Soupart, M.A., English (Emeritus) (1945), 1924. 

Mary Jaxe Wasmuth, B.Mus., Music (1943). 

Dorothy Marie Watson, ALA., Commerce (1943). 

May L. Wilt, M.A., Mathematics (1931), 1924. 

Mildred Y. Woofter, M.A., English (1937), 1936. 



24 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

The University Laboratory Elementary School Staff 

Blenda L. Proudfoot, M.A., Teacher, Intermediate Grades (11)4:]). 1039. 
Nellie R. Baliker, M.A., Teacher, Primary Grades (1944). 
Mary Jane Wasmuth, B.Mrs., Teacher, Music (1943). 



■On leave of absence, 1946-47. 
-Resigned August 31. 1946. 
"Substituting, 1946-47. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY STAFF 

Elmer M. Grieder, B.S.L.S., M.S., Librarian (1947). 

William Porter Kellam, 1 A.M., Librarian (1939). 

Lonna Dennis Arnett, 6 Ph.D., Librarian Emeritus (1935), 1910. 

Virginia Alice Alexander, 2 A.B. in L.S., Cataloguer (1945), 1944. 

Fleming Bennett, 8 A.B., B.S. in L.S.. Chief Audio-visual Aids Librarian (1046), 

1942. 
Ruth Blodgett, A.B., Assistant in Circulation Department (1940). 1932. 
Jennie Delawder Boughner, A.B., Assistant Extension Service Librarian (1946), 

1932. 
Forrest F. Carhart, Jr., A.B., A.M. in L.S., Assistant Librarian (1943). 
Maryella Durigg, A.B., A.B. in L.S., Senior Circulation Librarian (1946). 
Almalyne Flint, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Senior Reference Librarian (1947). 
Jessie Griffin, 3 A.B. in L.S., Reference Librarian (1940). 

Aline Hyder Hardwick, B.S., Assistant in Technical Processes Department (1946). 
Evelyn Pratt Hite, A.B., Cataloguer {limited service) (1944), 1922. 
Eleanor Eddy Knutti, Head Extension Library (limited service) (1944), 1022. 
Aida Rose Kravcik, 1 B.S. in L.S., Assistant Reference Librarian (1943). 
Oscar D. Lambert, Ph.D., Archival Consultant (1946), 1945. 
Elizabeth Lawrence, 4 A.B., B.S. in L.S., Senior Catalogue Librarian (1946). 
Lenore C. Lederer, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Junior Circulation Librarian (1947). 
Helen Loar, A.B., Assistant in Audio- visual Aids Department (1946). 
Elizabeth B. Lyle, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Senior Catalogue Librarian (1947). 
JESSIE B. Madigan, Assistant in Technical Processes Department ( 1932). 
Virginia Madigan, B.S., Assistant in Preference Department (1930). 
Elizabeth Brownfield Neel, Assistant in Librarian's Office (1936). 
Eloise Fisjier Newlon, 5 A.M., Senior Catalogue Librarian (1945). 
Byrd Lea PICKENS, M.A., Assistant Circulation Librarian {limited service) (1945), 

1930. 
Margaret Virginia Reay, 1 B.S. in L.S., Head Extension Library Service (1944), 

1927. 
Florence K. Reese, A.M., Assistant Professor of Library Science (1946). 1935. 
Mary Virginia Swisher, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Senior Reference Librarian (1940). 
Elizabeth Tarver, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Chief Technical Processes Librarian (1946). 



designed August 31, 194G. 

^Resigned September 30, 1946. 

3 Resigned October 15, 1946. 

^Resigned February 5, 1947. 
5 On leave, March 1 to June 30, 1 9 ! 7. 

6 Deceased April 15, 194 7. 

"Resigned September 30, 1947. 



The Agricultural Experiment Station staff 25 

Maky Elizabeth Wattles, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Acting Chief Reference Librarian 
(1946). 



Harriett Louise French, 7 A.B., LL.B., Librarian, College of Law (1946) 
^Resigned June 30, 1947. 



THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION STAFF 

Clayton Roberts Orton, Ph.D., Sc.D., Director a938), 1929. 

Richard Atkixs Ackerman, M.S., Assistant Dairy Husbandman (1946). L930. 

Walter Wardlaw Armentrout, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist (1934). 

Horace Leslie Barnett, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Mycologist (1945). 

Anthony Berg, M.S.. Associate Plant Pathologist (1925), 1913. 

Lowell Besley, M.F., Forester (1946), 1938. 

Robert Howell Black, M.S., Associate Animal Husbandman (1947). 1940. 

James Karl Bletner, B.S.. Assistant Poultry Husbandman (1946), 1935. 

Reed Howard Bradford, 1 M.A., Associate Sural Sociologist (1942). 

Walter Marion Broadfoot, 8 M.S., Assistant in Agronomy (1936). 

MAURICE Graham Brooks, M.S., Forester (1947), 1934. 

David Royal Browning, 8 M.A., Assistant in Agronomy (1941). 

JACK B. Byers, B.S.For., Assistant Forester (1946). 1940. 

Joseph Lincoln Cartledge, Ph.D., Associate Geneticist (1943). 1936. 

WHjLiam Henry Guilds, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist (1944). 1931, 

Thomas Baird Clark, M.S., Associate Poultry Husbandman (1943), 1927. 

James Harris Clarke, M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist (1947), 1939. 

Genevieve B. Clulo, A.M., Assistant Plant Pathologist (1940), 1932. 

Arthur R. Colmer, Ph.D., Associate Bacteriologist (1945). 

Ferris Dewey Cornell, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Director (1945), 1921. 

Cornelius Jktt Cunningham, B.S., Assistant Animal Husbandman, in Charge of 

Eeymann Memorial Farm (P. 0. Wardensville) (1943). 
John Dixon Downes, Jr., B.S.Agr., Assistant m Horticulture (1943). 
R. Franklin Dugan, M.F., Assistant Forester (1943), 1942. 
Robert Barclay Dustman, Ph.D,, Agricultural Biochemist (1929), 1924. 
Arthur Pingree Dye, M.S.Agr., Assistant Horticulturist (1941), 1923. 
Roy E. Emerson, B.S., M.S., Assistant Agricultural Engineer (1946), 1940. 
Harvey D. Erickson, Ph.D., Forester (1947), 1937. 
Clifford Auten Flanders, M.A.. Assistant Biochemist (1945). 
Sidney Longman Galpin, Ph.D., Hydrologist (1938), 1927. 
Edwin Gould, 3 B.S.Agr., Entomologist, in Charge of University Experiment Farm. 

(P. O. Kearney settle) (1946), 1929. . 
Harry Oram Henderson, Ph.D., Dairy Husbandman (1928), 1919. 
Torkel Holsoe, M.F., Associate Forester (1946), 1938. 
George Hyatt, Jr., B.S., M.S., Dairy Husbandman (1947), 1941. 
Harold Marteney Hyrf, M.S., Associatt Poultry Husbandman (1944), 1931. 
Gerald Jenny, M.S., Agricultural Editor (1929). 
John Charms .Johnston. Assistant to the Director (1943), 1914,. 
Julian Gilbert Leach, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist (1938). 



26 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

Virgil Greene Lilly, Ph.D., Associate Physiologist (1945), 1927. 

Edward Alexander Livksay, D.Sc, Animal Husbandman (1919). 

Alfred Delbert Longhouse, B.S., M.S.. Agricultural Engineer (1945), 1938. 

CONLEY VERNON Lowtiier, 4 M.S., Assistant in Plant Pathology (1944). 

Paul Lyon, Technical Aid in Biochemistry (1944). 

Gertrude McAllister, M.S., Assistant in Home Economics (1945). 

Mark Andrew McHale, B.S., D.V.M., Assistant Animal Pathologist (1945). 

Theodore Clinton McIlvaine, 3 Ph.D.. Associate Agronomist Emeritus, in Charge of 

Lakin Experiment Farm (P. 0. Lalin) (1947), 1917. 
Abraham Stanley Margolin, 5 Ph.D., Assistant H&lculturist (1936). 
Kay Stanley Marsh, M.A., Horticulturist (1936). 
Oliver Meader Neal, Jr., B.S., Assistant Horticulturist (1947), 1942. 
Charles Thompson Xeff, Jr., A.B., Comptroller (1934). 
Wilbur Mark Nelson, 6 A.R.P.S., Photographer (1939). 
Boyd J. Patton, 3 A.B., Soil Scientist (1945). 

Helen M. Paylech, B.S.Ed., Assistant in Animal Husbandry (1943). 
Leonard Marion Peairs, Ph.D., Entomologist (1911). 
W. Clement Perciyal, Ph.D., Forester (1939), 1934. 
George Gordon Poiilman, Ph.D., Agronomist (1938), 1930. 
Ward F. Porter, Jr., A.B., Assistant Rural Sociologist (1947). 
John Harrison Rietz, D.V.M., M.S., Animal Pathologist Emeritus (1947), 1927. 
Mary Alice Ryan, A.B., Assistant in Plant Pathology (1944). 
Frank Willard Schaeler, M.S., Assistant AgrononAst (1946), 1937. 
Burch Hart Schneider, Ph.D., Animal Husbandman (1945), 1938. 
Richard M. Smith, 3 A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Soil Scientist (1941). 
Richard Huyette Sudds, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist (1940), 1937. 
Carlton Fulton Taylor, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (1945), 1938. 
GEORGE E. Toben, M.S., Associate in Farm Management (1946). 
Karl Haven Tryon, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Silrieulturist (1945). 
Wilbur Jones Tyler, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Dairy Husbandman (1947), 1945. 
Edward Henry Tyner, Ph.D., Associate Agronomist (1943), 1938. 
Audrey Howard VanLandingham, Ph.D., Biochemist (1946), 1929. 
John R. Vaughn, 7 B.S., M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist (1945), 1941. 
Collins Veatch, Ph.D., Associate Geneticist (1945). 

Charles Edward Weakley, Jr., M.A., Associate Biochemist (1938), 1907. 
John Raymond Webb, M.S., Assistant in Agronomy (1947), 1941. 
Samuel Josephus Weese, B.S., M.A., Assistant Dairy Husbandman (1945). 
Kyle Chester Westover, Ph.D., Horticulturist (1945), 1921. 
Marion Wharton, M.S., Research Nutritionist (1946). 
Charles Vinyard Wilson, M.S., Animal Husbandman (1946), 1919. 



designed September 30. 1946. 

-Resigned September 15, 1946. 

"In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. 

^Resigned January 1, 1945. 

"Resigned January 15, 1947, to become Assistant Professor of Biology. 

''Resigned March 15, 1917. 

7 Resigned April 30, 1947. 



The Agricultural Extension Division Staff 27 

THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 
DIVISION STAFF 

John Oliver Knapp, 1 B.S.Agr.. Directt r \ L938), 1917. 

Charles C. Anderson, B.S., M.S., Administrative Assistant, Program Planning 

(1946). 
Walter Wardlaw A.rmentrout, Ph.D., Extension Economist (1941). 
\V. Hughes Barnes, M.A., Naturalist (P. 0. Wheeling) (1945). 
Waldo K. Bell, 3 B.S.Eng., Extension Agri<yultural Engineer (1945). 
Mabel Faffs Best, 8 A.B.H.Ec. Home Demonstration Agent at Large (1945), 1935. 
Charles Franklin Bishop, 1 M.S., Assistant Extension Plant Pathologist (1944), 

1940. 
Robert Stuart Boal, 1 B.S., Extension Economist in Marketing (1940), 1943. 
Anna Mildred BOGGS, 1 A.B., Assistant State Leader, Home Demonstration Work 

(1936), 1927. 
[ra Brooks Boggs, 1 State Boys' Club Agent | L933), 1926. 
Carroll Bond. A.B., Assistant Extension HoU Conservationist (P. 0. Jane Lew) 

(1942). 
Kenneth R. BOORD, 1 Assistant Extension Editor (1946). 1943. 
Leland Booth, B.S.Agr., Associate Extension Editor (1933). 
Herman McClure Bowers, 1 B.S.Agr., District Agent (1942), 1929. 
William Lewis Campbell, B.S., Extension Eield Agent in Dairying (1946). 
Roger Lee Chambliss, Jr., 1 Extension Economist in Farm Management (1946), 1941. 
Eloise Snowden CoferY A.B., M.S., Exit nsion Specialist in Foods and Nutrition 

(1942). 
Benjamin Franklin Creech, 1 B.S.Agr., State Supervisor, Emergency Farm Labor; 

Extension Animal Husbandman (1946). 1917. 
Carlton P. Dorsey, 1 B.S.Agr., Assistant State Supervisor, Emergency Farm Labor; 

Associate State Club Leader (1946), 1927. 
R. Franklin Dugan, 1 M.F., Extension Specialist in Wildlife Management (P. 0. 

Buckhannon) (1944), 1942. 
Ray Jerome FrianT, 1 B.S., Extension Agronomist (1929), 1922. 
Russell Henderson Gist, 1 B.S.Agr., State Club Leader (1933), 1924. 
Thomas Davis Gray, 1 B.S.Hort., Extension Landscape Architect (1946), 1920. 
Charles Henry Hartley, 1 B.S.Agr., State Club Leader (1933), 1914. 
Ted Robert Hash, 3 B.S., Assistant Extension Poultryman (1945). 
Gerald Heebink. 1 M.S., Extension Dairy Husbandman (1935). 
Harry Oram Henderson, Ph.D., Dairy Husbandman (1933). 
Florence Howard, 1 State Girls' Club Agent (1946), 1935. 

Gertrude Humphreys. 1 A.B., State Leader, Home Demonstration Work (1928), 1918. 
Claude Ray Kemper. 5 B.S.Agr., Extension Specialist in Vegetable Gardening (1946). 
Ruth Knoch, M.S., Home Demonstration Agent-at-large (1946). 
Julian Gilbert Leach, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist (1938). 
Jessie Fortney Lemley, 1 B.S.H.E., Assistant State Leader, Home Demonstration 

Work (1942), 1922. 
Edward Alexander Livesay, D.Sc, Animal Husbandman (1933). 



28 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

Jane Lyman, 1 A.B., Assistant Extension Editor, Radio (P. .Wheeling) (1945). 

Ray Stanley Marsh, M.A., Horticulturist (1936). 

Ohart.es Thompson' Neff, Jr., A.B., Comptroller (1934), 1927. 

Wilbur Mare Nelson," A.R.P.S., Assistant Extension Editor (1939). 

Charles K. Peck," B.S.For., Extension Forester (1943), 1942. 

High Willard Pretty man. 1 R.S.Agr.. Extension Horticulturist in Marketing (P. 0. 

In wood) (1917). 
Ira Deward Porterfield, B.S.. Assistant Extension Dairyman (1946). 
William Havard Roberts, 1 B.S., District Agent (1935). 
James Edward Saville, 7 B.S.Agr., Extension Poultry man (1945). 
George Sharpe, 1 B.S.Agr., M.S., Extension Soil Conservationist (1944), 1930. 
Bertha L. Shaw, Assistant to Director (1945), 1921. 
Edward Lee Shaw, B.S.Agr.. Extension Sheep Specialist (1917 s ). 
Eyerett Clifton SHERWOOD, 18 M.S., Extension Plant Pathologist (P. 0. Martins- 

hurg) (1920). 
JOSEPH FELTON Silbalgit, 8 B.S., Assistant Extension Editor (1946). 
Irene A. Spitz, 1 A.B., Extension Recreation Specialist (1946). 

Gladys Wasmuth, 1 M.S., Extension Specialist in Home Management (1941), 1935. 
Charles Yin yard Wilson, 1 M.S., Assistant Extension Animal Husbandman (1946), 

1919. 
Edward Woodward, 10 Extension Editor (1945). 



1 In cooperation wuli the United States Department of Agriculture. 
-Resigned June 15, 1946. 

3 In cooperation with the State Department of Agriculture. 
'On leave of absence, 194G-47. 
"Resigned March 22, 1947. 
6 Resigned March 15, 1947. 
^Resigned March 31, 1947. 
"Resigned February 14. 1947. 
'•'Resigned December 31, 1946. 
^Resigned June 30, 10 4 7. 

THE WEST VIRGINIA ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT 
STATION STAFF 

Walter Allos Koehler, Cii.E., M.S., Ph.D., Acting Director (1946), 1924. 
Roland Parker Davis. Ph.D., Professor of Structural Engineering (1911). 
George Pall Boomsliter, M.S. in C.E., Research Professor, Mechanics (1937), 1920. 
Harold Malcolm Cather, M.S.M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1945;, 

1916. 
Alexander Hardie Forman, M.M.E., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering 

(1947), 1913. 
Henry Withers Speiden, M.S.C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering (1941), 1931. 
Charles T. Holland, B.S.E.M., M.S.E.M., Research Engineer, Petroleum, Gas, and 

Coal Fellowships (1946). 
Howard P. Simons, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Research, Supervisor International 

Nickel Company Fellowship on Heat Transfer (1946), 1939. 
Jay Edgar Billingsley, B.S.C.E., Research Engineer, Petroleum and Gas Felloirsliips 

(1945). 



The Mining and Extension Division Staff 29 

Bennett Sexton White, 1 B.S.M.E., Assoeiatt Professor of Research on Design of 
Pulp Debarking Machines (1945), 1919. 

Jakes K. MacDonald, 8 Ph.D., issistant Professor of Research, Armstrong Cork 
Com/Hint/, Fellowship on Metallurgy (1944), 19-4:;. 

James Irving Reynolds, B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Research (part time), 
Steam Calorimeter Research (1944), 1942. 

Melvin Eugene Hixki.e, B.S.M.E., Research Associate, Bituminous Coal lit search. 
Inc., Fellowship on Coal Mini Drainage (1944). 

Charles W. Beeler, 8 A.B., Research Assistant, Bituminous Coal Research, Inc., Fel- 
lowship on Coal Mine Hoofs (1945). 

Edward P. Bartkus, 3 B.S., Research Assistant, Fellowship on Chemicals from Coal 
(1944). 

Kenneth O. Lilly, Research Assistant, Coal Preparations Fellowship (1945;. 

Robert Leo Alkire, B.S.. Assistant Research Engineer (1946). 

Stephen Wiswell, 4 B.S.Cii.E., Research Assistant (part time) (1946). 

Kathryn Huffman, M.S. (Chemistry ) , Chemist (part time) (1944). 

Haywaed Glen Taylor, B.S.Cii.E., Research Assistant (1946). 

Guy Avey, B.S.C.E., Research Assistant, Ciril Engineering (1946). 

Walter Wesley Baker, B.S.Cii.E., Research Assistant, International Nickel Com- 
pany Fellowship on Heat Transfer (1946). 

Howard McIntyre, B.S.Cn.E., Research Assistant (part time). Fellowship on Coil 
Mine Roofs (1946). 



Retired as Associate Professor of Research, July 1, 1046. 
-'Resigned September 15, 1946. » 

^Resigned July 1, 1946. 
^Resisrned June 7, 1946. 



THE MINING AND INDUSTRIAL EXTENSION STAFF 

Charles T. Holland, B.S.E.M., M.S.E.M., Assistant Diiector (1945), 1930. 

Mary Bandiera Allegrani, 1 B.S. (Chemistry), Research Assistant and Analyst 
(1945). 

Leslie Emil Bradley, A.B., Instructor in Mining Extension (1945). 

Paul Norris Brown, B.S.Cii.E., Research Ass-istant (part time) (1945). 

A. Page Dickens, Instructor in Mining Extension (1937). 

ROSCOE E. If anna, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Industrial Extension (1944). 

Thomas William Howard, B.S.E.M., Research Fellow in Mining and Industrial Ex- 
tension (1946). 

Kenneth O. Lilly, Research Assistant (1945). 

William Henry Mackenzie, Instructor in Mining Extension (1945). 

Joseph Dwight McClung, B.S.E.E., Instructor in Mining Extension (1941). 

James Stanley Poundstone, Instructor in Mining Extension (1924). 

W. B. Talbott, Instructor in Mining Extension (1927). 

Hobart Watson, Instructor in Mining Extension (1925). 

James Oliver Weekly, Instructor in Mining Extension (1945). 



'Resigned November 15, 1946. 



30 The staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

THE MILITARY STAFF 

Edward Page Lukert, Colonel, Infantry (1945). 
George W. Hawkins, Major, Corps of Engineers (1040). 
Kfkmit B. Blaney, B.S.Agr., Captain, Infantry (1946). 
Joseph W. Ivhixstamm, Captain, Signal Corns (1047). 
Tom L. Marshall, B.S.Aoi;., Captain, Mr Corps (1946). 
George Norrie, Jr., Captain, Infantry (1946). 
James W. Evans, Jr., First Lieutenant, Air Corps (1947). 
Edwin J. White, Jr., First Lieutenant, Air Corps (1940). 



James F. Kast, Master Sergeant, Field Artillery (1944). 
Jack C. Mixox, Master Sergeant, Corps of Engineers (1946). 
John D. Parsons, Master Sergeant, Air Corps (1940). 
EUGENE J. Ryshkus, Master Sergeant, Signal Corps (1940). 
TONY J. Terrizzi, Master Sergeant, Air Corps (1947). 
Robert C. Caldwell, Technical Sergeant, Air Corps (1940). 
HENRY C. Carter, Technical Sergeant, Air Corps (1940). 
Alfred H. Ortmann, Staff Sergeant, Infantry (1942). 
HORACE W. Parker, Technician Third Grade, Ordnance (194(5;. 

THE ATHLETIC STAFF 

Roy M. Hawley, A.B., Director of Intercollegiate Athletics (193S), 1935. 

Forrest B. Crane, A.B., Director of Athletic Publicity (1947), 1942. 

Glennis F:llis, B.S., Assistant Football Coach (1942). 

Albert C. Gwynne, A.B., Coach in Wrestling (1934) . 

Irvin Edward Howell, A.B., Assistant Coach in Football (1947) 

William Fraxklix Kern, A.B., Coach in Football (1940). 

Samuel John Morris, M.D., Eedical Adviser (1935). 

Lee Pattox, Basketball Coach (1945). 

Ira Errett Rodgers, A.B., Assistant Coach in Football and Head Coach in Baseball 

(1943), 1920. 
Arthur Xewell Smith, A.B., Coach in Trad: Athletics, Cross-country, and Athletic 

Trainer (1931), 1923. 
Lowry McElvaine Stoops, Assistant Director of Intercollegiate Athletics (1920). 

THE ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

G. O. Romxey (chairman), C. L. Colson, H. M. Fridley, and J. O. Knapi\ 
faculty members; G. \V. Jackson and I. L. VanVoorhis, Alumni members; R. G. 
Gentry, student member; and Wm. G. Thompson, Board of Governors member, 

ex officio. 

THE STANDING COMMITTEES* 
The University 

COMMITTEE OX STUDENT AFFAIRS (GENERAL): Mr. Aspinall, Director of 

Student Affairs (chairman), and the chairman of each of the following sul>- 



[ The first-named member serves as chairman. 



The Standing Committees 31 

committees: convocations, discipline, student residences, social affairs, University 

calendar, student publications, student body, student organizations, and prizes, 

scholarships, and loans. 

CONVOCATIONS AND PUBLIC EXERCISES: Messrs. Aspinall, Crocker, 
Cuthbert, and Harris; student members, Ruth Cox and Prank A. Andy. 

DISCIPLINE: Messrs. Strausbaugh and Besley; Miss Stalnaker. 

FRATERNITY AND SORORITY SCHOLASTIC RECORDS: Messrs. Peairs, 
Long, and Semon ; Mrs. Cole. 

OFF-CAMPUS SCHEDULES: Messrs. Aspinall, Siiortridge, and Hayman. 

PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS: Messrs. Aspinall, Stone, 
Armentrout, Ctttiibert, Hayman, and Henning; Miss Arnold. 

SOCIAL AFFAIRS: Messrs. Darby, Morris, Lukert, Cornell, and Wells; 
Misses Arnold, Palmer, and Griffin; student members, Mabel Elizabeth 
Clower, Harriet L. Wiedebusch, Ervin R. Baker, Jr., and John Hughes 
Conley. 

STUDENT BODY: George M. Pumich, Jr., president; Ann Yeager, vice-presi- 
dent; Russell K. Bolton, Senior representative; Constance Bevins, Senior 
representative ; Robert R. Brown, Junior representative ; Rosalee Statler, 
Junior representative; William H. Hess, Senior Class president; Leland E. 
Byrd, Junior Class president; Patricia Stuckman, Sophomore Class presi- 
dent; Mort Union, Freshman Class president. 

STUDENT FEE FUND: Mr. Aspinall and Miss Arnold; student members, 
George M. Fumich, Jr., William I. Powell, and Betty Ashburn Gum. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: Messrs. Dustman, Wheat, and Fridley; Miss 
Turner and Mrs. Allen. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS: Messrs. Reed, Spiker, Hawley. Gather. 
Wherry, Peairs, and Hardman ; student members, Margaret Jackson and 
J. Clarence Spitznogle. 

SUBCOMMITTEE ON NEW RESIDENCES: Messrs. Aspinall, Miller, and 
Dickinson. 

STUDENT RESIDENCES: Messrs. Aspinall, Corson, Stone, and Sleetti ; 
Misses Arnold and Waddell; student membei-s, Mary Jo Hickey and 
Robert E. Johnson, Jr. 
ADMISSIONS: The Registrar and the deans and directors of all colleges and 

schools admitting freshmen. 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS SCHOLARSHIPS: Messrs. Cornell, C. H. Gather, J. 

L. Hall, Long, and Romney; Miss Arnold. 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS: Messrs. Miller and Dye. 
PERMANENT BUILDINGS: Messrs. Lazzell, Baldwin, II. M. Gather, Marsh, 

and Summers. 
RADIO: Messrs. Brooks, Jenny, Summers, Sunley, and Vest; Miss Sorelle. 
SPACE ALLOCATION: Messrs. Baldwin, Miller, Hubert Hill, and Long. 

The Senate 

COMMITTEES: Messrs. Brawner, Curtis, Forman, Leach, and Romney. 
EXTENSION: Messrs. Aspinall, Baldwin, C. R. Bishop, Frasuee, Holland, and 

Knapp. 
INSTRUCTIONAL POLICIES AND PRACTICES: Messrs. Spiker, Ashburn, 



32 The Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

Co: lett, Dodds, E. C. Jones, Percival, and Wheat. 
LIBRARY: Messrs. Bennett, Allen, Brawner, Erickson, MacLaciilan, Seibert, 

Summers, and Miss Stalnaker. 
MEMBERSHIP: Messrs. Strausbaugh, Brooks, ami Lawless. 
PUBLICATIONS: Messrs. Abel, Battles, H. M. Cather, Jenny, Keen, Long, and 

Reed. 
RESEARCH: Messrs. Leach, Anderson, Crocker, Lazzell, Martens, Simons, 

Sturm, Thomas, Van Liere; Messrs. Orton, Koehler, Dustman ex officio. 
SUMMER SESSION: Messrs. Dadisman, Easton, Long, Shortridge, and Miss 

Palmer. 
TEACHER TRAINING: Miss Noer; Messrs. C. R. Bishop, Colebank, Cuthbert, 

Gibson, McBride, Parsons, Stemfle, and Taylor; Miss Griffin. 
TENURE AND RETIREMENT: MESSRS. DICKINSON, Armentrout, Colwell, 

Sleeth, and Vest. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 
LATIN AMERICA: Messrs. Manning, Ashburn, Aspinall, Mitrani, and Veatch. 
RESOURCES OF THE STATE: Messrs. Holland, Besley, Fridley, Pohlman. 
and Sun ley. 

The Colleges 

SCHOLARSHIP : 

College of Agriculture: Messrs. Pohlman and Percival and Miss Dietrich. 
College of Arts and Sciences: MESSRS. Winter, Ford, Harris, Spiker, and 

Smith. 
College of Education: Messrs. Wheat and Cook and Miss Pollock. 
College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: Messrs. Hall, Koehler, and C. II. 

Cather. 
School of Journalism: Messrs. Reed and Bell and Miss Sorelle. 
School of Medicine: Messrs. Dodds, Chandler, Fenton, MacLachlan, and 

Sleeth. 
School of Music: Messrs. Cuthbert and Wood and Miss Hinkel. 
College of Pharmacy : Messrs. Geiler, Bergy, and Wojcik. 
School of Physical Education and Athletics: Miss Hurst and Messrs. Semon 

and Tork. 



NOTE: For all other college committees sec the announcements of the re- 
spective collegv or school in Part III of this Catalogue. 

Fraternity Advisers 

Beta Thefca Pi, A. M. Reese; Delta Tau Delta, Carl M. Frasi rk; Kappa Alpha, 
C. R. Bishop; Kappa Sigma, A. J. Dadisman; Phi Delta Theta, Robert Colwell; 
Phi Kappa Psi, David W. Jacobs; Phi Kappa Sigma, Charles L. Lazzell; "Phi 
Kappa Tau, Dana Wells; Phi Sigma Delta, V. J. Lemke; Phi Sigma Kappa, Sam- 
uel J. Morris; Pi Kappa Alpha, R. H. Wherry; Pi Lambda Phi, G. P. Boomsliter; 
Sigma Chi, G. Ott Romney; Sigma Nu, Russell H. Gist; Sigma Phi Epsilon, H. G. 
Wheat; Tan Kappa Epsilon, F. F. Carhart, Jr. 

Sorority Supervision 

Supervision of all sororities (see page S. -> >) on the campus is vested in the Office 
of the Dean of Women. 



Part II 
General Information* 



HISTORY 

West Virginia University originated from the National Land-Grant 
(Morrill) Act of July 2, 1862, and the subsequent action of the Legislature 
in accepting and carrying out the provisions of the Act. On January 9, 1866, 
the board of trustees of the Monongalia Academy at Morgantown tendered 
to the Legislature, for use of the contemplated state or land-grant college, 
all its property, including Woodburn Female Seminary, on condition that the 
college should be located at Morgantown. On January 30, 1867, the Legis- 
lature accepted the property and on February 7 passed an act permanently 
establishing "The Agricultural College of West Virginia" and authorizing 
the Governor to appoint 11 suitable persons as a Board of Visitors. 

The Visitors held their first meeting on April 3, 1867, at which time they 
appointed Dr. Alexander Martin president and established collegiate, scientific, 
and agricultural departments of instruction. Military training was introduced 
at this time under the provisions of the Morrill Act. 

By an act of December 4, 1868, the name of the College was changed to 
"West Virginia University" and the "Board of Visitors" to the "Board of 
Regents." On July 1, 1919, the "Board of Regents" was merged in the "State 
Board of Education." By an act passed April 14, 1 ( j27, the control of the 
University was vested in a "Board of Governors." 

Following the establishment of the University, expansion was rapid. The 
College of Law was added in 1878; the College of Engineering and Mechanic 
Arts in 1887; the Agricultural Experiment Station in 1888; the College of 
Agriculture and the School of Music in 1897; and the School of Medicine in 1902. 

With the opening of the new century a period of consistent growth was 
entered upon. A Department of Pharmacy was added to the School of Medicine 
in 1914; in the same year the Department of Home Economics, until then 
a unit in the College of Arts and Sciences, was transferred to the College of 
Agriculture. The Division of Agricultural Extension was organized in 1912, 
and Liberal Arts extension centers were established as early as 1916. 

In 1917 an extensive building program was inaugurated, which has added 
eight major units to the Campus. The Engineering Experiment Station 
was organized in 1921 and the School of Mines in 1926. In 1927 the work in 
Education, hitherto administered as a department of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, was transferred to the newly-created College of Education. In 1928 
the Division of Physical Education was created. 

Paralleling this development, faculties were methodically strengthened, 
curricular adjustments steadily undertaken, and foundations laid for social, 
industrial, and scientific research agencies as bases for still broader fields of 



*NOTE: West Virginia University reserves the right, without further notice, 
to revise the organization, fees, offerings, and requirements herein announced. 

[33] 



34 Gen krai. Information 



service. The movement culminated in the order of the Board of Governors 
of January, 1930, providing for the establishment of a Graduate School looking 
beyond the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science, which the 
University had steadily conferred for half a century, to the more advanced 
curricula leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

In 1936 the Department of Pharmacy was discontinued as a unit in the 
School of Medicine and was established as a College of Pharmacy. A year 
later the Division of Physical Education and the Department of Athletics 
were combined to form the School of Physical Education and Athletics. The 
Course in Forestry, begun in 1935 as a two-year course in the College of 
Agriculture, in 1937 was enlarged to a full four-year course enabling this 
college to grant the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry. The unit then 
became the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. In 1939 
the Department of Journalism was discontinued as a unit in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and was made the School of Journalism. In the same year 
a Department of Art was established in the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
Department of Social Work was authorized in 1943 to offer undergraduate 
work leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (Social Work) and on the 
graduate level a one-year Social Work curriculum leading to a Professional 
Certificate of Social Work. A new four-year course offered by the College 
of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science (Medical Technology) was approved in 1944. 

The University has had 12 regular presidents: Alexander Martin, 1867- 
1875; John W. Scott (acting), 1875-1877; John Rhey Thompson, 1877-1881; 
Daniel Boardman Purinton (acting), 1881-1882; William L. Wilson, 1882-1883; 
Robert C. Berkeley (Chairman of the Faculty), 1883-1885; Eli Marsh Turner, 
1885-1893; Powell Benton Reynolds (acting), 1893-1895; James L. Goodnight, 
1895-1897; Jerome Hall Raymond, 1897-1901; Daniel Boardman Purinton, 1901- 
1911; Thomas Edward Hodges, 1911-1914; Frank Butler Trotter (acting), 
1914-1916; 1916-1928; John Roscoe Turner, 1928-1935; Robert Allen Armstrong 
(acting), 1935; Chauncey Samuel Boucher, 1935-1938; Charles Elmer La wall 
(acting), 1938-1939; 1939-1945; Charles Thompson Neff, Jr., (acting), 1945-1946; 
Irvin Stewart, 1946-. 

LOCATION 

West Virginia University is located in Morgantown, the county seat of 
Monongalia, south of the Mason-Dixon line where it forms the boundary 
line between southwestern Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia. 

Morgantown is 11 hours by rail from New York City, 12 hours from 
Chicago, and three hours from Pittsburgh. It may be reached from the east 
and west through Grafton, West Virginia; Connellsville, Pennsylvania; or 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania. It is served by two railroads, the Baltimore and 
Ohio and the Monongahela, which is owned jointly by the Baltimore and Ohio, 
the Pennsylvania, and the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie (New York Central 
System). 

Motorists can reach Morgantown from the National Pike (U. S. Route 40) 
through Uniontown or Washington, Pennsylvania; Wheeling, West Virginia; 
or Cumberland, Maryland; and from the Northwestern Turnpike (U. S. Route 
50) by way of Oakland, Maryland, or Grafton, West Virginia. 



The Physical Plant 35 



Morgantown is connected with the national network of motorbus lines 
through the Blue Ridge (Greyhound) and West Virginia Transportation Com- 
pany (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad) systems. 

THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

West Virginia University's Campus comprises about 66 acres near the 
center of Morgantown on high ground overlooking the river and much of the 
surrounding countryside. The physical plant includes 36 state-owned build- 
ings or structures on the Campus, five demonstration and experimental farms 
near Morgantown, three experimental farms and two agricultural extension 
centers located at suitable points throughout the state, a summer surveying 
camp for Civil and Mining Engineering students, and a summer camp for 
Forestry students. 

The structures on the main Campus, with dates of construction or ac- 
quisition, are: Martin Hall (1870), Experiment Station Building (1873), 
Woodburn Hall (1874), Commencement Hall* (1889), Science Hall (1893), 
Mechanical Hall (1902), Armory (1902), Old Library (1902), President's House 
(1905), Heating Plant (1906), Music Building (1914), Horticulture Greenhouse 
(1915), Medical Building (1916), Oglebay Hall (1918), Oglebay Annex (1933 
and 1937), Women's Hall (1919), Plant Pathology Greenhouse (1920), Law 
Building (1923), Mountaineer Field (1924), Cafeteria (1924), Hall of Chemistry 
(1925), Men's Field House (1928), Elizabeth Moore Hall (1928), University 
Library (1931), University Rural High School (1933), two wings to Women's 
Hall (1935), Men's Dormitory (1935), Beaumont House (1937), Alexander Wade 
School (1939), Mineral Industries Building (1942), University Health Center 
(1942), Terrace Hall (1942), Home Management House (1942), Library Com- 
mission (formerly Health Service) (1942), Forestry Building (1946), and two 
Annexes (194 6). 

The farms, with dates of acquisition, are: Dairy Husbandry Farm, 175 
acres (1899) and 29.5 acres (1941); Horticulture Farm, 62.5 acres (1916); 
Animal Husbandry Farm, 321 acres (1916) and 262.5 acres (1941), including 
a portion for poultry husbandry; Agronomy Farm, 102 acres (1916); and 
Poultry Husbandry Farm, 20 acres (1916), all near Morgantown; University 
Experiment Farm at Kearneysville, Jefferson County, 158 acres (1930) ; Rey- 
mann Memorial Farms at Wardensville, Hardy County, 930 acres (1917) and 
57 acres (1943); Lakin Experiment Farm at Lakin, Mason County, 74 acres, 
leased from the State Board of Control (1921); Reedsville Experiment Farm, 
Preston County, 457 acres (1944). 

The agricultural extension centers, with the dates of establishment, are: 
the 4-H Club Camp at Jackson's Mill, Lewis County (1921), and the Recreation 
Center at Oglebay Park, Ohio County (1926). 

FUNDS 

The funds for maintaining the University, the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, the Engineering Experiment Station, the Mining and Industrial Ex- 
tension Division, and the Agricultural Extension Division are derived from 
the following sources: (1) Interest on the land-grant endowment of $115,300; 
(2) the Morrill-Nelson fund; (3) the Hatch fund; (4) the Adams fund; (5) 



36 General Information 



the Smith-Hughes and the Smith-Lever funds; (6) the Purnell fund; (7) the 
Capper-Ketcham fund; (8) the Bankhead-Jones fund; (9) the Bankhead- 
Flannagan fund; (10) biennial appropriations by the Legislature; (11) fees 
and tuition; (12) income derived from the sale of farm and dairy products 
as well as income from athletics, dormitories, dining halls, bookstore, student 
activities, etc.; and (13) contributions by private benefactors for the support 
of scholarships, loan funds, and prizes. 

GOVERNMENT AND ORGANIZATION 

Direction of the educational, administrative, financial, and business affairs 
of the University is vested in the Board of Governors. The board is bipartisan 
and consists of nine members who are appointed by the Governor with stag- 
gered terms of service. 

West Virginia University is on the approved list of the Association of 
American Universities and is a member of The North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

The University year is divided into two semesters of 18 weeks each and a 
Summer Session of two terms of approximately six weeks each. 

Acting in an advisory capacity to the President and assisting him in carry- 
ing out established University policies is a Council of Administration, com- 
posed of the president, the vice-president, the registrar, and the deans and 
directors of all colleges and schools, as well as other administrative officers 
who may be called to take part in the deliberations of the Council. 

The University Senate, a legislative body with jurisdiction over all aca- 
demic matters that concern the entire University and all matters that concern 
more than one college or division, is composed of the president, the vice-presi- 
dent, the registrar, all professors, associate professors, and assistant pro- 
fessors in all colleges, schools, and divisions, and all heads of departments. 

The Graduate Faculty, composed of all members who teach courses on 
the graduate level, sets the specific requirements and standards of quality for 
admission to candidacy for graduate degrees and for the award of graduate 
degrees. For a list of members of the Graduate Council, see page 8. 

The Committee on Student Affairs acts as an integral part of the whole 
organization of the University. Its program is bound up with that of the 
University as a whole, designed to serve the larger academic and social ob- 
jectives of modern education. For a list of members, see page 30. 

The Colleges and Schools 

The organization of the University, together with the dates of the estab- 
lishment of the various colleges, etc., follows: 

Colleges: College of Arts and Sciences, 1867; College of Law, 1878; 
College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts, 1887; College of Agricul- 
ture, 1897; College of Education, 1927; College of Pharmacy, 1936. 

Schools: School of Music, 1897; the Summer Session, 1898; School 
of Medicine: Courses in Medicine, 1902; School of Mines, 1926; Gradu- 



Government and Organization ;)? 

ate School, 1930; School of Physical Education and Athletics, 1937; 
School of Journalism, 1939. 

Divisions: Division of Military Science and Tactics, 1867; Divi- 
sion of Forestry, 1937; Division of Home Economics, 1937. 

Experiment Stations and Research Bureaus: Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, < 1888; Engineering Experiment Station, 1921; Bureau 
for Government Research, 1931; Division of Documents. 1934. 

Extension Service: Agricultural Extension, 1912; Mining and In- 
dustrial Extension, 1914; Liberal Arts Extension, 1916; Extension in 
Education, 1916. 

The College of Agriculture. Forestry, and Home Economics; the College 
of Arts and Sciences; the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts; the 
College of Pharmacy; the School of Mines; the School of Music; and the 
School of Physical Education and Athletics are all degree-granting units ad- 
mitting freshmen. The College of Education, the College of Law, the School 
of Journalism, and the School of Medicine are professional colleges and schools 
requiring from two to three years of academic training as a foundation for 
professional work. All graduate instruction is administered by the Graduate 
Council and the Graduate Faculty. 

A full description of the organization and offerings of the colleges and 
schools of the University is found in Part III of this Catalogue. 

The Summer Session 

The forty-ninth Summer Session of the University will be held from June 4 
to August 22. 1947. The session will be made up of two terms of six weeks each. 

The College of Law will conduct one 8-weeks session. The University 
Rural High School will be in session the first nine weeks for secondary-school 
student teaching, practice supervision, and observation. The University Labora- 
tory Elementary School will be in session during the first six weeks for elemen- 
tary-school observation and practice supervision. 

The requirements for admission and the character of the work offered are 
the same for the Summer Session as for the regular year. 

Credit may be obtained towards the Bachelor's and Master's degree in 
most of the departments. Offerings are varied from summer to summer so that 
students may complete the work for the Master's degree by attending summer 
sessions only. 

For complete description of courses, see the Summer Session Bulletin. 

The Division of Military Science and Tactics 

(1) Requirements: 

a. West Virginia University, a beneficiary of the Act of Congress of 1862, 
offers, in time of peace, a four-year and eight-weeks course of instruction in 
military science and tactics. Successful completion of the entire course leads to 
a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Officers' Reserve Corps, United 
States Army, honor graduates of West Virginia University successfully com- 
pleting the entire course are offered commissions as Second Lieutenant in the 
Regular Army, under conditions prescribed by law. 

b. The course comprises two years of elementary (Military Science 1, 2, 3. 
and 4), two years of advanced training (Military Science 105, 106, 107, and 108), 
and a Summer Camp of eight weeks' duration during the summer normally fol- 



38 General Information 



lowing the Junior year. The Summer Camp is conducted at government expense, 
and eligible students are paid $75 monthly in addition to traveling expenses for 
the full period of attendance. 

c. All male students not specifically exempt by the provisions of the ap- 
propriate paragraph below are required by chapter eighteen, article eleven, of 
the official code of West Viginia, and by orders of the Board of Governors of the 
University, to complete satisfactorily the entire elementary course as a prere- 
quisite to graduation from the University. This work may be taken as enrolled 
or nonenrolled members of the Officers' Training Corps. To be enrolled in the 
R. O. T. C. a student must successfully pass the prescribed qualifying examina- 
tions and be physically fit for subsequent voluntary service as a commissioned 
officer of the Army. Quota limitations for both elementary and advanced mili- 
tary science are set by the War Department and cannot be exceeded without 
special authority. 

(2) The Curriculum: 

a. Elementary instruction is given for three hours per week throughout the 
two semesters of each school year. Two hours' credit is allowed for each 
semester's work. 

b. The third and fourth years of instruction in military science, normally 
corresponding to the Junior and Senior years of the student, comprise the ad- 
vanced course and are entirely elective on part of the student and highly selec- 
tive on part of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Application for ad- 
vanced training should be made not later than the end of the preceding school 
year to insure favorable consideration. Instruction is given in Infantry. Corps of 
Engineers, Air Corps, and Signal Corps, on basis of five hours per week. Three 
hours' credit is allowed for each semester completed. 

c. Army veterans with 12 months or more of service are eligible to apply 
for enrollment in the advanced course immediately upon entrance into the Uni- 
versity for the fall semester. No enrollments for this course will initially be 
made at any other time. Veterans with iess than 12 months' service, but more 
than six, will be eligible to apply for enrollment in the advanced course only 
upon completion of MS 3 and MS 4. Veterans who have attained their twenty- 
seventh birthdays are ineligible. 

(3) Allowances: 

a. Commutation of subsistence, in the amount of the current value of the 
Army field ration, will be paid monthly to each student taking the advanced 
course. Proposed legislation now in the hands of Congress will raise this daily 
allowance by $1. In addition, officer-type uniforms are furnished all military 
students by the government. 

b. Basic students will be furnished a regulation Army uniform only. 

(4) Military Deposit: 

Each student must deposit with the Comptroller, at time of registration, 
the sum of $10 to cover any loss or damage to Government property while in 
his possession. This deposit will be refunded at the expiration of the school 
term upon undamaged return of the property. 

(5) Exemptions: 

a. The following students will not be required to enroll in the Division of 
Military Science and Tactics but may elect to do so with the approval of 
the Professor of Military Science and Tactics: 



Goverxmeni and Organization 3 ( j 

(1) Those who are not citizens of the United States and do not intend 
applying for citizenship. 

(2) Those who, at time of entrance, are more than 23 years of age, and 
former students over that age who re-enter the University after an 
absence of three years. 

(3) Graduate students. 

(4) Students whose studies are entirely within the School of Music. 

(5) Students who are taking only the short course, the special interim 
courses, or extension work. 

(6) Students who at time of matriculation have successfully completed 
not less than 58 hours of work, and all who have completed the two- 
year basic ROTC course at an institution maintaining a senior unit. 
Those who have satisfactorily completed one, two, or three semesters 
in a senior unit will be allowed comparable credit. 

(7) Students who are unable to perform military duty for physical 
reasons. 

b. Exemptions will be determined by the adviser from student's records 
and from recommendations of the University physician. 

c. Veterans of World War II are exempted from taking basic military 
training (i.e., Military Science 1, 2, 3, and 4). But note paragraph 2 c in con- 
nection with advanced course work. 

(6) Organization: 

The Division of Military Science and Tactics and the conduct of military 
training is the responsibility of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, 
who, together with his military staff, are officers and noncommissioned 
officers of the Army appointed by the War Department for duty at West 
Virginia University. 

(7) The University Band: 

a. The University band functions under the Military Division, the respon- 
sible head being the P. M. S. & T. 

who. together with his military staff, are officers and noncommissioned 

b. Membership is drawn from all classes, including graduate students, of 
the various schools and colleges of the University. Assignment thereto is 
determined by audition. All band members are required to take such military 
training as the P. M. S. & T. may direct. 

c. In the near future, an R. O. T. C. Band will be organized. Until such time 
as this is accomplished, enrolled and non-enrolled R. O. T. C. students are en- 
couraged to try out for the University Band. Band instruments are furnished. 

The Library 

The Library's origin coincides with that of the University itself. Mononga- 
lia Academy possessed a small collection of books which became the nucleus 
of a library for the newly formed institution. 

The function of the Library is to provide the books and related materials 
necessary for successful instruction and research. In line with this function, 
the Library strives to build strong, well-balanced collections in all subject 
fields included in the curricula of the University. Although primarily designed 
to supply the study and research needs of the staff and students, the Library 



40 General Information 



collections are available to anyone, and many of its holdings may be borrowed 
through interlibrary loan, and to residents of West Virginia through the 
Library's Extension Service department. 

There are approximately 200,000 catalogued volumes in the book collec- 
tion. About 1,100 periodicals and newspapers are received currently, many 
of them gifts. There is a special collection of books, manuscripts, and news- 
papers relating to West Virginia. It is estimated that there are more than 
500,000 pieces in the collection of private manuscripts, about 3,000,000 items 
in the collection of court records, and several thousand volumes of news- 
papers, periodicals, and books. 

Audio-visual materials are recognized as important implements of instruc- 
tion. The Library has about 450 educational motion-picture films, 250 film 
strips, a sizeable group of recordings, and a small collection of slides. 

Except during vacations and holidays, the Library is open from 7:55 a.m. 
to 10:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; from 7:55 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Satur- 
day; and from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday. During periods when the 
University is not in session, the hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 
1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday throuugh Friday; 9:00 a.m. to 12:03 noon on 
Saturday; closed all day Sundays and holidays. 

University Extension 

The work of this division is under the general supervision of the Director 
of University Extension. The work given in extension courses corresponds 
in every particular to that given in the same courses on the Campus. Students 
taking extension courses for credit must satisfy fully all requirements for 
admission to the University and, before registering, must file with the Regis- 
trar of the University complete official transcripts of their entrance credits. 

The maximum undergraduate credit that may be counted towards any 
degree for extension work conducted by the University is 48 semester hours. 
The maximum undergraduate credit that may be counted towards a degree 
for extension w T ork taken in other institutions is 30 semester hours. No more 
than 15 hours of work taken in graduate extension courses may be counted 
towards any graduate degree, and of these only 8 semester hours may be in 
one field. 

No University extension courses may be offered for credit without the 
approval of the Director of University Extension. Library and laboratory 
facilities for each course must be approved by the Director and, in the case 
of courses for graduate credit, by the Graduate Council. Reference books for 
the use of extension students may be borrowed from the University Library 
upon the order of the Director of University Extension, subject to the ap- 
proval of the Library Committee. Postal charges must be paid by the in- 
dividual or groups for whom the books are borrowed. 

A fee of $8.00 per semester hour is charged for each extension course 
offered for undergraduate credit. A fee of $10.00 per semester hour is chargd 
for each extension course offered for graduate credit. 

For further information write to the Director of University Extension. 



Living Accommodations 4L 



The University Book Store 

The University Book Store, located on the ground floor of the Law Build- 
ing, is maintained for the convenience of the students and staff. It is open 
during customary business hours and keeps on hand constantly textbooks, 
stationery, drafting-room instruments and supplies, etc., which are available 
to the staff and students at a discount price. The Eook Store also buys and 
sells used textbooks. 

Musical Organizations 

The University and Community Orchestra is open to all students who are 
proficient in the use of orchestral instruments. Rehearsals are held weekly. 
Students participating receive 1 hour of credit each semester. 

The University Women's Glee Club is open to all University girls who 
can sing a part. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students participating receive 
1 hour of credit each semester. 

The University Men's Glee Club is open to all University men who can 
sing a part. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students participating receive 1 hour 
of credit each semester. 

The University and Community Mixed Chorus is open to all students who 
can sing a part. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students participating receive 
1 hour of credit each semester. 

The University Band is open to all University men who can qualify. Con- 
certs are given locally in addition to out-of-town appearances. 

University Broadcasting 

Broadcasting of radio programs to the people of West Virginia was estab- 
lished at the University in May 1938, when Station WMMN, Fairmont, 
began a series of noncommercial programs originating on the campus. Since 
1940, when Station WAJR was established in Morgantown, University pro- 
grams have also teen broadcast locally. During the school year 1946-47, regular 
weekly and other Campus programs are broadcast over WMMN as well as 
over WAJR. All are of an educational, informative, or entertaining nature. 

The University is prepared to open its doors to all West Virginia stations 
that wish to broadcast special Campus events. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 

The University maintains three large dormitories, one for men and two 
for women. For information as to accommodations and rates, address the 
office of the Business Director of Residence Halls. Cost of room and board 
will be determined later. 

The following rules are in effect: 

No student will be permitted to live in other quarters until after 

the Men's Hall and the Dormitories for Women are fully occupied. 
In the assignment of rooms in these buildings all freshmen shall 

he required to take rooms therein before members of any other classes 

shall be assigned rooms therein, no freshman being allowed to live 

outside the dormitories if there is room in them. In enforcing the 

above rules the following exceptions shall be made: 

(1) When the parents or legal guardians of the students reside 



42 General Information 



in Morgantown or within commuting distance of the University, 
these rules shall not apply. 

(2) When the home of the student is within such distance that 
it is entirely practicable for him to live in his home and reach the 
University by car or otherwise for all his classes, these rules shall 
not apply. 

(3) When students above the rank of freshman reside in approved 
sorority or fraternity houses under the supervision of the Director 
of Student Affairs and the Dean of Women, these rules shall not apply. 

(4) When conditions of employment (such as firemen in various 
buildings and homes, employment on dairy and experimental farms, 
etc.) require residence on the premises, these rules shall not apply. 
When the space is needed for underclass women, no senior sorority 

woman will be permitted to live in Women's Hall if there is room for her in 
her sorority house. 

Because of the greatly increased enrollment and the shortage of dormitory 
space, rooms are assigned only to students whose tomes are in West Virginia. 
Men's Hall is reserved for freshmen. Assignments are for the academic year. 

More detailed information may be found in the Dormitory Bulletin, a 
copy of which will be furnished by the office of the Business Director of 
Residence Halls. 

Board and lodging for woman graduate students .is available in private 
dwellings in Morgantown. Board and lodging for men also is available in 
private dwellings. For information concerning houses on the approved list 
men should address the office of H. E. Stone, West Virginia University, 
Morgantown. Women should communicate with the office of the Dean of 
Women, Morgantown. 

Cafeteria 

The University Cafeteria is open for all three mea's, except on Sunday. 
Only the noon meal is served on Sunday. 

ADMISSION TO THE UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Methods of Admission 

Sudents are admitted to the University either by examination or on 
certificates from accredited secondary schools.' In the latter case the certifi- 
cates must set forth the work of the student in detail. Diplomas or certificates 
of a general nature are not sufficient. 

Candidates for admission to the University must be at least 16 years of 
age. They must present certificates of good moral character, and if from 
other colleges or universities, they must present letters of honorable dismissal. 

Candidates for admission who do not present entrance certificates, or 
who come from other institutions of learning without letters of honorable 
dismissal may, at the discretion of the Committee on Admissions, be allowed to 
register provisionally. In every such case the Registrar will make immediate 
inquiry of the institution from which the applicant comes, and if satisfactory 
certificates of credit and good standing cannot be obtained, the registration 
will be cancelled and the fees paid by the applicant will be returned. A pro- 
visional registration will not ordinarily be continued for a period longer than 
one week. 



'In accrediting West Virginia secondary schools the University follows the 
Classification made by the State Supervisor of High Schools. 



Admission TO THE UNIVERSITY 43 



Entrance Unit Defined 

The requirements for admission to the various colleges of the University- 
are stated in terms of units. 

A unit in any subject represents the amount of work that may be done 
in a standard high school in a year of 36 weeks, with five recitation periods 
per week, of no less than 40 minutes each. In courses in which laboratory 
work is required, from two to three periods of laboratory work are considered 
the equivalent of one period of recitation according to the amount of outside 
preparation required in connection with such work. 

Graduates of accredited schools receive credit for the work certified, with 
the understanding, however, that no student may enter any college or school 
of the University until he has credit for 15 units, i. e., the work of the standard 
four-year high-school course. 

Certification of Entrance Unit 

Entrance units should be certified on the blank form prescribed by the 
University, so that credit values may be readily computed. These certificates 
should be sent to the Registrar at least two weeks before the applicant presents 
himself for matriculation. Failure to do this will result in delay in registra- 
tion and may render the student liable for the payment of the $2 late-regis- 
tration fee. After the certificate has been considered by the Committee on 
Admissions and the credits recorded, it becomes the property of the Univer- 
sity and is permanently filed in the Registrar's office. 

Prescribed and Elective Units 

A. Fifteen units of l:igh-school work are required for entrance to the Uni- 
versity. 

B. The following groups are required: 

(1) Four units in English'- 

(2) Three units in a second subject 

(3) Two units in each of two other subjects. 

C. The work in "A" must include the following: 

For admission to all colleges and schools, 1 unit in algebra. 

For admission to the College of Agriculture, in the case of students 
who elect agriculture or forestry as their major field of study — 1 unit in 
plane geometry. 

For admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, in the case of 
students who intend to elect chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics, or 
pre-medical studies as their major field of study — 1 unit in plane geometry. 

For admission to the College of Engineering or the School of Mines — 
iy 2 units in algebra, 1 unit in plane geometry, and % unit in solid 
geometry. 3 



2 A student may enter the University with 3 units in English and satisfy ad- 
mission requirements by making- at satisfactory grade on the English Placement 
Test, or by successfully completing English 1C, English Composition. 

The the College of Engineering and in the School of Mines, a student may 
enter with only 3 units in English if he also presents for entrance 2 units in a 
foreign language. 

3 Students entering the College of Engineering or the School of Mines may be 
admitted conditionally with only 1 unit of algebra or without solid geometry, but 
they will be irregular in their schedule. All conditions must be removed during 
Hie first year. 



44 General Information 



For admission to the College of Pharmacy — 1 unit in history and 1 
unit in science. 
D. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of units placed 
after each subject will be accepted: 

Subject Units Subject Units 

English 4 Science 

Foreign languages 4 Physics 1 

Latin 4 Chemistry 1 

Greek 3 Biology 7 1 

French 3 Botany 7 1 

German 3 Zoology 7 1 

Spanish 3 Geology 1 

Italian 3 General science 1 

Education 2 Physical geography 1 

Mathematics Physiology % 

Algebra 2 Commercial geography y 2 

Plane geometry 1 Commercial law y 2 

Solid geometry i/ 2 Vocational subjects (not to ex- 
Trigonometry y 2 C eed 4 units) 

History and Economics"' Agriculture 1 

Hi story 3 Household arts 3 

Civics 1 Manual training 3 

Economics 1 Bookkeeping or bookkeeping 

Sociology 1 anc | commercial arithmetic . 2 

Drawing Commercial arithmetic (alone) y 2 

Free-hand drawing 1 Shorthand 

Mechanical drawing 1 Typing 

Music (applied) 2 Aeronautics ''.'. 

Journalism 1 Art 

Speech 1 Hygiene and sanitation 



Physical education 

Special Requirements for Admission 

All candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws must present a minimum 
of 90 hours of credit from an institution of approved standing. All work taken 
after June 1, 1947, must carry an overall average of at least 1.3 honor points, or 
the equivalent. In computing such overall average, one honor point will be de- 
ducted for each hour of F Courses in military science and physical education 
(service program) will not be counted either in computing hours of credit or 
honor points. Work taken before June 1, 1947, will be acceptable provided it car- 
ries an average grade of C, or one honor point per credit hour, or the equivalent. 

Any degree fom an institution of approved standing will be regarded as satis- 
fying the requirements for admision provided, in the opinion of the Scholarship 
Committee of the College of Law, the degree satisfies the entrance requirements 
of the Association of American Law Schools. 



*1 unit of I^atin will be accepted. No less than 2 units of either French, Ger- 
man, Greek, Italian, "or Spanish will be accepted unless sufficient additional work 
in that language is taken in college to complete a minimum of 2 units. 

A group of 3 units may be formed by combining 2 units of history with 1 
unit of levies, economics, or sociology, or with V2 unit each of any two of these 
subjects. 

8 A group of 2 or 3 units in science may be made by combining 1 unit each of 
any two or three of the following: physics, chemistry, botany, biology, zoology, 
geology. 

7 If d student presents either botany or zoology for entrance he may have 
credit for no more than y 2 unit of biology; if he presents both botany and zoology, 
no credit in biology will be allowed. 



Admission to the University 



iy applicant for admission must present to the secretaiy of the school, 
before registration, a complete transcript of his record in each institution which 
he has attended after completion of his secondary education. 

No applicant will be admitted who previously shall have attended another 
law school and who shall be ineligible to return to that school in good standing. 
The College of Education: 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education shall be the 
completion of 58 semester hours of approved college work, with an average of 
at least 1 honor point per credit hour. Candidates for the bachelor's degree 
in Education register for their first two years of work in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Freshmen and sophomores who expect to enter the College of 
Education will indicate their intention when they register. Their studies will 
be directed by Professor Elizabeth Stalnaker, adviser for pre-Education 
students. Such students should so order their courses of study as to satisfy 
requirements for junior standing and should be fulfilling requirements for the 
certification of teachers. 
The School of Journalism: 

A candidate seeking admission to the School of Journalism with the view 
of obtaining a degree must have satisfied the requirements for matriculation 
in one of the University undergraduate colleges and must have earned at least 
58 semester hours of college credit. A student deficient in physical education 
and military science will be required to take these subjects as soon as pos- 
sible. During his freshman and sophomore years he should have completed 
satisfactorily all or most courses specified for pre-journalism majors. A pre- 
journalism student not maintaining at least a C average during his first two 
years in all college subjects is strongly advised not to enroll in the professional 
school. 
The School of Medicine: 

In addition :o the high-school requirements the applicant for admission 
to the School of Medicine must have credit for at least three years of work 
in a college of recognized standing. This must include 90 hours of credit ex- 
clusive of military science and physical education. 

This 90 hours of credit must include the following subjects and hours: 
English composition, t! hours; physics, S hours; biological sciences, 12 hours 
(mainly zoology and comparative anatomy); chemistry. 20 hours (including 
fi hours organic): psychology, 3 hours; a modern foreign language, 12 hours 
(German or French preferred); Latin. 6 hours recommended. 

Selection of Students: The number of students the Medical School can 
accommodate is strictly limited. Applications for admission are considered by 
the Committee on Admissions of the School of Medicine, which selects those 
with the highest qualifications of scholarship and personal fitness. An im- 
portant factor is the score of the applicant in the aptitude test sponsored by 
the Association of American Medical Colleges and given at suitable times. 
Applicants are required to take this test unless individually excused by the 
Committee on Admissions. Students should consult pre-medical advisers 
about taking this test. Applications for admission may be made as much as a 
year in advance of the opening date. Only bona fide residents of West Vir- 
ginia may be considered for admission. 



46 General Information 



Farther details concerning entrance requirements to the School of Medi- 
cine may be obtained by writing to the Dean of the School of Medicine or to 
the Registrar of the University. A full statement concerning suggested pre- 
medical courses is to be found in Part III of this Catalogue (page 122). 
The School of Music: 

Students who meet University entrance requirements are admitted to the 
School of Music either by examination or on certificate from an accredited 
secondary school. In case of the latter, the certificate must set forth the work 
of the student in detail. Students may enter the Applied-music courses in the 
School of Music at any time during the semester without credit. An examina- 
tion will be given them to determine what work they are prepared to do. 
It is to their advantage, however, to enter at the beginning of the semester. 
Students majoring in Music will be expected to have acquired previously a 
background in the fundamentals of music and a fair ability in music reading. 
All students will be examined at least twice a year, in January and in May, 
to determine the progress made. 

In the School of Music special provision may be made to permit talented 
individuals to take work in Applied Music without credit. 
Conditional Admission: 

Students must make up all deficiencies before they can be classified as 
sophomores. 

Special Students 

Persons who do not desire to become candidates for a degree may, by 
permission of the Committee on Admissions and of the faculty and dean of the 
college which they desire to enter, be admitted as special students, subject to 
the following provisions: 

1. Special students must as a rule be 21 years of age. 

2. Special students must satisfy at least 9 units of the requirements for 
admission, including 2 units of English. 

3. Every application for admission as a special student must be pre- 
sented in writing to the Committee on Admissions and must set forth fully the 
applicant's reason, together with a detailed statement of the studies he desires 
to pursue. 

4. Special students are subject in all respects to the usual rules relating 
to registration and scholarship. They may be assigned to classes for which 
Ihey apply, it being understood, however, that admission to any class rests 
entirely with the instructor in charge, and further, that admission to any 
class when so granted does not necessarily imply credit for prerequisites. 

5. In the College of Law, students with less than the academic credit 
required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws will be admitted as 
special students only if: 

(a) they have credit for no less than two years of work of collegiate 
grade in an institution of approved standing; 

(b) they are at least twenty-three years of age; 

(c) there is good reason, acceptable to the Scholarship Committee, for 
thinking that their experience and training have specially equipped them to 
engage successfully in the study of law, despite the lack of the required col- 
lege credit; and 



ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 47 

(d) the number of such special students admitted each year shall not 
exceed ten percent of the average number of students admitted by the Col- 
lege of Law as beginning regular law students during the two preceding years. 

6. In the School of Mines, special provisions are made for those taking 
strictly vocational courses. 

Admission to the Graduate School 

Applicants holding Bachelors' degrees from West Virginia University or 
from other accredited institutions may be admitted to the Graduate School by 
formal application to the Chairman of the Graduate Council. An official 
transcript of previous academic record must be sent directly to the Registrar 
of the University by the registrar of the other institution. Additional under- 
graduate work may be required by the University departments in which the 
candidate proposes to specialize. 

Applications for admission should be made either in person or by letter 
approximately one month before the opening of the semester or term for 
which registration is desired. Blank forms may be obtained from the Chair- 
man of the Graduate Council. The application must be in the hands of the 
Council at the time the student presents himself for registration for graduate 
courses. If the student contemplates entering upon candidacy for an advanced 
degree he should announce in his application his choice of a major field of 
study. Then he will be referred to the head of the department in which he 
desires to do his major study, who will assign him to an adviser. 

Eligible students who wish to further their education without reference 
to a higher degree will be admitted to the Graduate School provided they elect 
graduate courses for which they can satisfy the prerequisites. 

Advanced Standing 

Application for advanced standing on account of work of college grade 
done before entrance to the University should be made to the Committee on 
Admissions not later than two weeks after the applicant's matriculation. 

If no certificates are offered or if those offered are considered by the 
rcmmittee on Admissions to bo irregular or insu ficient, the Committee will 
arrange for an examination of the applicant. Upon payment of the examina- 
tion fee, the Registrar will issue an examination card to the dean of the 
proper college, who will sign the card and forward it to the department con- 
cerned. After the examination the head of the department will report to the 
office of the Registrar the names, numbers, and credit values of the courses, 
if any, for which the applicant is entitled to credit. 

The College of Law: 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing must satisfy the ordinary 
requirements for admission to tne first-year class, must have successfully 
pursued the study of law in a school which is a member of the Association of 
American Law Schools, and must have received credit for courses equivalent 
to those required of students in the College of Law. The extent of credit 
allowed for work done elsewhere is determined by the Scholarship Committee. 



48 General Information 



Any applicant for advanced standing may also, in the discretion of the 
faculty, he required to pass examinations in any or all courses presented for 
credit. 

The School of Music: 

Advanced standing in applied music is given only by examination. Persons 
desiring such standing should enroll at the beginning of the semester, and 
after they have become thoroughly familiar with the requirements for each 
semester's work, they may take a special examination in which they will prove 
their ability to meet the requirements as outlined. 

The College of Pharmacy: 

No student shall be permitted to complete the course in pharmacy in less 
than three collegiate years in a college of pharmacy, regardless of the amount 
of credit offered for advanced standing. This is in accordance with the by- 
laws of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

Credit in Correspondence Work: 

Credit up to a maximum of 30 semester hours for work completed by cor- 
respondence in non-laboratory courses will be accepted by the University 
when such work is given by accredited colleges or universities that accept 
this work for credit toward their own degrees and whose residence work is ac- 
cepted by West Virginia University. In compliance with an order of the State 
Board of Education, however, credits obtained in correspondence courses will 
not be considered in certifying students for teachers' certificates. 

VETERANS OF WORLD WAR II 

The University recognizes that men and women from the Armed Forces 
who enter college require individual and personalized guidance in order to 
facilitate their entrance into the University and to aid in their adjustment to 
University life. A special University Veterans Counseling Committee, com- 
posed of representatives from several colleges and schools, is prepared to 
assist veterans in obtaining expert advice for the planning of a program 
which is best suited to the needs of the individual. In addition, a Veterans 
Coordinator is available for consultation and help in the solution of personal 
problems which may arise in the transition to civilian student life. 

Information regarding the educational opportunities made possible at the 
University through the provisions of the Service Men's Readjustment Act of 
1944 (G. I. Bill of Rights) and the Vocational Rehabilitation Program of the 
Veterans Administration (Public Law 16) may be obtained from the Veterans 
Coordinator, J. C. Gluck, by personal conference or by mail. 

Veterans of World War II may be admitted to the University by the 
Committee on Admissions by any of the following methods: 

1. Graduation from an accredited preparatory school. 

2. Presentation of 15 units of high-school work without graduation. 

3. Advanced standing from other accredited colleges or uni- 
versities. 



Registration J9 



4. Evidence of sufficient maturity and ability to do college work 
furnished by the use of United States Armed Forces Institute tests 
and norms for high school; American Council on Education tests; 
or by tests and norms developed locally in any college, school, or 
department. Training of any kind received in the service will be con- 
sidered and, if possible, evaluated for entrance or college credit. 

5. Veterans who present at least 9 units of entrance credit may 
be admitted as special students. 

6. In some instances, with the approval of the college, school, 
or division concerned, special short courses may be arranged for 
veterans who do not meet any of the above-mentioned requirements. 

An honorably discharged veteran of World War II who has successfully 
completed basic training in the Aimed Forces of the United States shall be 
excused from any additional work in Basic Military and in the Physical 
Education Service Program. 

REGISTRATION 

Persons who are not registered as students in the University and who 
are not members of its administrative or teaching staffs shall not be ad- 
mitted to regular attendance in University classes. 
Time and Place of Registration: 

All students are expected to register on the days set apart for registration 
at the beginning of each semester or term of the University. Students in 
the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics, the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the College of Education, the College of Pharmacy, the 
Graduate School, the School of Journalism, the School of Music, and the 
School of Physical Education and Athletics register in the Field House on 
Beechurst Avenue. Students in the College of Engineering register in Me- 
chanical Hall; students in the School of Mines register in the Mineral In- 
dustries building; students in the College of Law register in the College of 
Law building; and students in the School of Medicine register in the School 
of Medicine building. 

Registration for the first semester, 1947-48, will take place on Saturday, 
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. September 13, 15, 16, and 17. 1947. 

Immediately after completion of their registration, all students are ex- 
pected to pay their fees at the office of the University Comptroller in the 
Administration Building. 

During registration week all male freshmen will report at the Field 
House for assignment of lockers, for appointment for physical and medical 
examinations, and for physical achievement tests. 

Freshmen women will report during registration week al Elizabeth 
Moore Hall for similar examinations and tests. 

All freshmen are required to take such intelligence and placement tests as 
are made part of the Freshman Week program. 
College Credit Defined: 

A college credit or semester-hour represents the amount of work done in 
one semester in one recitation hour with two preparation hours a week. 
From two to three hours of laboratory work are considered equivalent to one 
hour of recitation, according to the amount of outside work assigned in con- 
nection with the laboratory hours. 



50 General Information 



Numbering of Courses: 

Courses offered in the various colleges and schools of the University are 
numbered so as to indicate the rank (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior, or 
graduate) of the students for whom they are intended. See page 88. 
Adviser: 

The college in which a student is enrolled shall have jurisdiction over 
'he course of study of that student. Each student upon entering the Uni- 
versity is assigned to an adviser, whose duty it is to assist the student in his 
registration, to keep a record of his work, and to report his registration and 
standing to the Registrar as required. The adviser approves the student's 
program of studies, sees that all prescribed work is taken in proper sequence, 
approves the selection of elective courses, and assists the student generally in 
planning his course of study so that he may proceed systematically and with- 
out conflicts. Changes in registration must always have the approval of the 
adviser. The student will look to his adviser for guidance in all matters 
pertaining to his work. 
Maximum anci Minimum Work: 

The maximum and minimum number of hours per semester as well as the 
maximum number of hours per year for which a student may register during 
the regular academic year of the University are as follows: 

Minimum Maximum 
Hours per Hours per 
Semester Semester Year 

Agriculture 14 20 

Arts and Sciences 14 18 34 

Education 18 35 

Engineering and Mechanic Arts 14 20 

Forestry 14 20 

Home Economics • • 14 18 34 

Journalism 14 18 36 

Law • • 13 16 

Medicine . .-■ •• 17 20 

Mines 14 20 

Music H 20 

Pharmacy ■ • • 14 20 

Physical Education and Athletics 14 20 

The work of the Summer Session is equivalent in character to that of the 
tegular year. Six semester hours' credit is a normal load for either term. A 
student who has earned 2.0 honor points (Arts and Sciences standard) for 
each hour of registration during the last semester or summer term in res> 
dence at the University may petition the respective Scholarship Committee 
or the Graduate Council if a graduate student, to take no more than eight 
hours. This rule may not be used to reduce the graduate residence require- 
ment.. 

A student desiring to do irregular work, more or less than the prescribed 
number of hours in any college, must obtain permission from the Committee 
on Scholarship in his college. This permission is not valid until it has been 
reported to the Registrar for record. 
Late Registration: 

No student will be permitted to register in the University after the 
eighteenth day of a semester or the ninth day of either term of the Summer 



Registration 51 



Session, without the special permission of the dean of the college or director 
of the school which he proposes to enter. No student registering late will 
be permitted to enroll for more hours of work than the number of weeks in 
actual attendance without the permission of the Committee on Scholarship 
of the college or school concerned. 
Substitution for Required Courses: 

A student who desires to substitute another course for any course pre- 
scribed in his curriculum or required for the degree toward which he is 
working, must obtain permission for such substitution from the Committee on 
Scholarship in his college or school, but there can be no substitution from 
group to group. 
Visitors: 

Students who are registered in the University may be permitted to attend 
classes as visitors, provided they shall have obtained the written permission 
of their advisers and of the instructors in the classes they desire to visit. 
Members of the administrative or teaching staffs, or other regular employees 
of the University, may be permitted to attend classes as visitors, provided 
they shall have obtained the written permission of the heads of their depart- 
ments and of the instructors in the classes which they desire to visit. 

No record is kept of the work and attendance of persons admitted to 
classes as visitors and no credit is given for their work in such classes. 

Persons eligible to attend classes in the University as visitors may obtain 
the proper permission blanks from the Registrar. 
Withdrawal from the University: 

A student who desires to withdraw from the University must obtain a 
withdrawal card from the office of the Registrar. Withdrawal procedure will 
be explained to him when he obtains this card. 

Students who withdraw from the University without permission will re- 
ceive at the end of the semester a grade of "FIW" (failure because of irreg- 
ular withdrawal) in each of the subjects for which they are registered and 
will be indefinitely suspended from the University. 

Students who desire to drop part of their work may withdraw from classes 
in which they are enrolled with a grade of W at any time prior to the end of 
the second week following the date set for mid-semester reports. Withdrawal 
permits must be approved by the adviser and filed with the Registrar. If such 
withdrawal reduces the student's hours below the required minimum, the per- 
mit must be approved by the Scholarship Committee. Withdrawals after the 
above date will be permitted only in exceptional cases and must be approved 
by the Scholarship Committee of the college in which the student is registered. 
Re-entry after Withdrawal: 

Students required to withdraw from one college of the University because 
of failure in their work and permitted to transfer to another college of the 
University may not again register in the college in which they were originally 
registered without the consent of the Scholarship Committee of that college. 
Return of Books to the Library: 

Students must present a signed statement from the Librarian that they 
have returned all books and paid all the library fines incurred, before they 
withdraw. No student will be allowed to graduate before paying all fines and 
returning all Library books. 



General Information 



UNIVERSITY FEES AND EXPENSES 

■i 
(Subject to change without notice) 

Fees 

All fees are due and payable at the Comptroller's office on the day of 
registration. 1 Students registering pay the following fees: 



Semester Fees in the Colleges and Schools 







REGULAR YEAR 




SUMMER 


SESSION 


! 


COLLEGE 


Full Time2 


Part Time* 


Full Time-' 


Part Time* 


REMARKS 


OR SCHOOL 


I Non- 
Resi- j resi- 
dent 8 i dent 8 


Resi- 
dent 8 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 8 


Resi- 
dent 8 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 8 


Resi 
dent 8 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 8 




Agri. For., EL Ec. ... 
Arts and Sciences... 
Education 
Engineering 


$ 40.00* 


Fees in this col- £ 
umn include out- Q 
of state tuition. =? 


$ 3.00 

P 

en 


$ 8.00 

er 

dit 

ur 


$ 25 or 
$ 30f 


$ 35 or 
$ 40f 


$ 5.00 $ 7.00 

' 1 
per 
credit 


♦Includes Contingent 
fee ($30); Student 
Activity fee ($7); J 
Health Service fee 
($2.50); land Hospita 


Mines 

Physical Education 
and Athletics 




ho 


ur 


fee (50c): 
tEither term, lower 
figure; both terms 
higher figure. 


M i 


$ 75.00* 


$150.00* 














*See above 






Pharmacy 

(See "Special fees 
in Pharmacy") 


$ 65.00*5140.00* 

1 


$ 4.00 
per cred 


$ 12.50 
it hour 










*See above 








$ 12.50 
t hour 


$ 40.00$ 50.00 










Iper credi 


$ 8.00 
per cred 


$ 10.00 * See above 

it hour 


Medical Technician 
(Jr. & Sr. Years) 


$ 65.00* $140.00* 

1 




No instruction 

during . ,* See above 
the summer 


Medicine 


$127.00* 


$202 00* 

1 


$ 8.00 
per cred 


$ 12.50 
it hour 



TStudents who have not paid their fees before the close of office hours of the 
second Saturday following- the opening of a semester or a summer term, shall be 
dropped from the rolls of the University, and the Registrar shall notify their 
instructors that their class cards are to be withdrawn. 

-A full-time student is one who is registered for 10 or more semester-hours 
of work during each semester of the regular academic; year, or 4 or more semes- 
ter-hours of work during each term of the summer session. A full-time student 
during the regular academic year receives a student activity book which en- 
titles him to admission to all out-door athletic events and, by the payment of an 
additional nominal amount at each event, entitles him to admission to all in-door 
athletic events held in the Field House. A full-time student during the regular 
academic year, or during the summer session is entitled to free medical con- 
sultation and advice from the University physician. A moderate charge is made 
for room-calls, X-rays, special laboratory tests, drugs furnished by the University 
Pharmacy, minor operations, treatment of fractures and dislocations, and in- 
travenous treatment. 

J No person shall be considered eligible to register in the University as a resi- 
dent student who has not been domiciled in the State of West Virginia for at 
least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration. No non-resident 



Pees and Expenses 5:'. 



Special Fees 



Late-registration fee (nonrefundable) " $ 2.00 

Graduation fee 6 10.00 

Professional Engineering degree (including $10 graduation fee) . . 25.00 

Student's record fee 7 1.00 

Junior certificate 1 .<>(> 

Special extra fee for flight training: 

A.E. 101 100.00 

A.E. 102 • • 100.00 

G. 121 100.00 

G. 123 180.00 

Special extra fee for Social Work : 

Social Work 311, Field Work 12.50 

Social Work 312, Field Work 12.50 

Change in registration fee (after 8th day) 1.00 

Fee for examination for entrance credit, per unit 1.00 ' 

Fee for examination for advanced standing 3.00 

Fee for General Educational Development tests (high-school 

level) 15.00 

Social work certificate 2.00 

Fee for reinstatement of students dropped from the rolls 3.00 

Fee* for examination of candidates for graduate degrees 1.00 

Student locker fee (men) 2.50 

Student locker fee (women) 2.00 

Vocational non-credit, per month 25.00 

Special Fees in Medicine and Pharmacy 

Students in colleges and schools other than the College of Pharmacy and 
the School of Medicine who register for courses in the College of Pharmacy 
or the School of Medicine Fhall be required to pay a fee of $4.00 per credit 
hour for such courses in addition to the fees charged in the colleges or schools 
in which they are registered. 



student may establish domicil in this State, entitling him to reductions or ex- 
emptions of tuition, merely by his attendance at the University. A minor student 
whose parents have become domiciled in West Virginia after the student's 
original registration in the University, will be deemed to have the domicil of his 
parents and be entitled to pay resident fees thereafter. Moreover, any student 
who has originally paid non-resident fees may become entitled to pay resident 
fees, if after an interim of non-attendance or otherwise he has established a 
valid legal domic'l in this State at least twelve months prior to his re-registra- 
tion in the University. In any event, the appointment of a guardian for a minor 
student temporarily resident in West Virginia, other than the designation of a 
natural guardian, shall not in and of itself operate to establish a West Virginia 
domicil for such student. 

4 A part-time student is one who is registered for fewer than 10 semester- 
hours per semester during the regular academic year; or for fewer than 4 semes- 
ter-hours per term during the summer session. 

5 Charged when students register after registration date announced in the 
Catalogue, page 5. 

"The graduation fee is payable by all students at the beginning- of the semes- 
ter or term in which they expect to receive their degrees or diplomas. 

7 One transcript of a student's record is furnished by the Registrar without 
charge. This fee is charged for furnishing an additional transcript. 

*For graduate students not otherwise enrolled at time of final examination. 

iNonrefundable. 



54 General Information 



Regularly enrolled students in the College of Pharmacy are given the 
privilege of enrolling without additional fees in required Pharmacy courses 
offered in the School of Medicine. 

Regularly enrolled pre-medical students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences are given the privilege of registering for the following courses in the 
College of Pharmacy without additional charge: Pharmacy 2, Pharmacy 3, 
Pharmacy 9, Pharmacy 106, and Pharmacy 107. 

School of Music Fees 

1. Students Registered for Degrees in the School of Music: 

In addition to the fees required of all full-time students (see table on 
page 52), resident and non-resident students registered for degrees in 
the School of Music pay the following fees each semester: Voice, piano, 
violin, pipe organ, theory and composition, and public-school music, $35. 

2. Special Students Registered in the School of Music: 

(a) Theory Courses — Special students registered in the School of 
Music for theory courses in music shall pay $5 per credit hour for these 
courses. 

(b) Applied Courses — Special students registered in the School of 
Music for courses in applied music shall pay tuition fees in each semester 
as follows: for courses in voice, piano, violin, pipe organ, or band and 
orchestra instruments — one lesson per week, $35, two lessons, $55. For 
instrument classes the fee is $5 per semester. In ensemble courses the 
fee in accompanying is $5 per semester; in chamber music, $5 per 
semester. 

(c) Special Work in another College or School — Special students 
registered in the School of Music who take special work in another college 
or school of the University shall pay music fees plus the regular rate per 
credit-hour for the work they are taking in another college or school. 

3. Students Registered in Other Schools and Colleges: 

(a) Theory Courses — Students registered in other schools and col- 
leges of the University may enroll for theory courses in the School of 
Music without paying additional fees. 

(b) Applied Music — Students in other schools and colleges of the 
University who enroll for one or more courses in applied music shall pay 
the regular fees required in the school or college in which they are regis- 
tered plus music fees as follows: for courses in voice, piano, violin, pipe 
organ, or band and orchestra instruments, one lesson per week, $20; two 
lessons, $35. 

4. Piano, Pipe Organ, and. Orchestral Instruments for Practice: 

(a) Piano for Practice — one hour a day, $6 per semester; two hours, 
$10; three hours, $14; four hours, $18. 

(b) Pipe-organ Practice — one hour a day, $10 per semester. 

(c) Orchestral Instruments — rental fee, $2.50 per semester. 

Deposits 

The deposits required are as follows: breakage deposit in chemistry, $5 to 
$10; breakage deposit for students enrolled in medical technology course and in 
the School of Medicine, $10; for students enrolled in other colleges and schools 
of the University electing courses in medical technology or medicine, $5 for one 
laboratory course and $10 for more than one course; military-science deposit, 
$10; breakage deposit in pharmacy, $10. 



Requirements wob Degrees 



Extension of Collegiate Grade 

A fee of $8.00 per semester hour is charged for each extension course 
offered for undergraduate credit. A fee of $10.00 per semester hour is charged 
for each extension course offered for graduate credit. 



Refunding of Fees 



A student who withdrew regularly" from the University ma)' arrange for a 
refund of fees by submitting to the Comptroller approval by the Registrar of 
the refund. Semester fees will be returned in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

Amount of Refund 
During the first and second weeks' 

All contingent and tuition fees less $2.50 

During the third and fourth weeks 80% of contingent and tuition fees 

During the fifth and sixth weeks 607c of contingent and tuition fees 

During the seventh and eighth weeks. 40% of contingent and tuition fees 
Beginning with the ninth week No refunds allowed 

Cost of an Academic Year's Work 

A student's textbooks will cost from $20 to $40 a year, and his registra- 
tion fees $80 to $254 if he is a resident; or $230 to $404 if a non-resident. 
Students in engineering will use drawing instruments costing from $15 to $25. 
The laboratory breakage deposit required ranges from $5 to $10, a part of 
which is usually returned at the end of the year. In military science a $10 
deposit is required to cover military equipment in the custody of the student, 
practically all of which is returned to the student when he accounts for his 
equipment. Board and room may be obtained at from $324 to $400 a year. A 
student's washing will cost from $18 to $24 a year. Traveling expenses, cloth- 
ing, and other miscellaneous items will depend largely upon the tastes and 
habits of the individual student. In general, however, it may be said that the 
legitimate cost of a nine months' term of residence at the University ranges 
from $5C0 to $800 a year. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Candidates for degrees are eligible for graduation upon the completion 
of the requirements, in the college or school in which they are registered, 
which were in effect at the time of their first registration in that college or 
school, provided they apply for graduation within a period of seven years from 
the time of their first registration. Students who fail to complete the re- 
quirements for graduation w T ithin seven years from their first registration in 
the college or school in which they are candidates for degrees, shall satisfy 
the requirements in effect at the time they apply for graduation. 

All University degrees are conferred by the Board of Governors upon 
recommendation of the faculties of the various schools and colleges. Degrees 



8 To withdraw regularly a student must apply to the Registrar por permis- 
sion. The withdrawal permit must be approved by the student's advisor and the 
Dean of the College and filed in the Registrar's office. 

'•'Student Activity fee. Health Service fee, and Hospital fee nre nonrefundable. 



GENER W. I N FORMATION 



are granted at the close of the semester or summer session in which the 
students complete their work. 

Candidates for degrees to be conferred at the close of the second semester 
must be present, in person to receive their degrees unl sss excused by liie 
deans of their colleges or directors of their schools. 

Scholastic Sfandmg and Honor Points 

Marking System: 

A — excellent, (given only to students of superior ability and attainment) 
B — good (given to those students who are well above the average bur. 

who are not in the highest group) 
C — fair (average students) 
D — poor but passing 1 
E — condition 
F — failure 
I — incomplete 
FIW — failure because of irregular withdrawal 

W — all withdrawals prior to the end of the second week following the 
date set for mid-semester reports. 
WP — withdrew passing subsequent to the end of the second week fol- 
lowing the date set for mid-semester reports. 
WF — withdrew failing subsequent to the end of the second week follow- 
ing the date set for mid-semester reports. 

Honor Points: 

The quality of a student's work is indicated by honor points. 

a taoulation, showing the number of honor points, if any, and the grades 
for which they are given in the various divisions of the University, follows: 

Grade A B-f- B C-f C* D F 

All colleges, schools, and divisions except 

the College of Law 2 3 — 2 — 1 — — 

College of Law 5 4 3 2 1 — — 

Baccalaureate Degrees 

Credits and Honor Points Required: 

Less than 6 hours in an ancient or modern language will not be counted 
toward any University degree, diploma, or certificate unless work in the same 
language has been offered for entrance. 

Six hours of English composition and rhetoric (English 1 and 2) are 
required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree in all colleges and schools 
of the University. 



1 Students are permitted to re-register in any course for which a grade of D 
has been received. In such cases the second grade shall supersede the first, pro- 
vided it is not lower than D. Veterans of World War II may re-register for 
courses in which they have a grade of C or higher, but no credit will be given 
for the new listing. 

-In the College of Law the sign + after the grades A, B. or C will be used to 
indicate the differences in standing between students receiving the same letter 
grade. In the Graduate School, no credits are acceptable toward an advanced 
degree wit It a rank lower than C. 



Requirements for Degrees 57 



Eight hours of military science and tactics are required of all freshmen 
and sophomore men not specifically exempt. 3 

Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the first 
year in residence, and four hours of physical education for women, to be taken 
during the first and second years in residence, are required for graduation, 
except in the case of students entering with advanced standing amounting to 
58 semester hours or more. 

Each baccalaureate degree is conditioned upon the completion of a speci- 
fied number of semester hours of credit. For a tabular statement of the num- 
ber of credit hours required for each degree, see the last column on page 
58 under the caption "Classification of Students." 

All divisions of the University require minimum standards of scholastic 
quality. These are expressed in terms of honor points. Honor points are 
computed only on grades earned at West Virginia University (including 
Potomac State School of West Virginia University), and all courses taken in 
this institution which are offered towards credit requirements for the degree 
for which the student is a candidate shall be included in the computation 
of honor points. The student must maintain an average of one honor point 
per credit hour in order to be eligible for graduation, except in the College 
of Law, which requires an average grade of C. The College of Education, 
in addition to a general average of 1 honor point per credit hour in all sub- 
jects, requires an average of 1 honor point per credit hour in Education and 
in each teaching field.- 

In order to be eligible for recommendation for any West Virginia high- 
school teaching certificate, every student in Wtest Virginia University who 
desires any such certificate must have a general honor-point average of 1.0 
and also an honor-point average of 1.0 in each teaching field and in Education. 

In all units except the College of Engineering and Mechanics Arts, the 
Graduate School, the School of Journalism, the College of Law, and the School 
of Medicine, students may decrease the total number of credit hours required 
for graduation by doing work of superior quality. For each 8 honor points 
in excess of 1 honor point per credit hour, the number of credit hours re- 
quired for graduation may be diminished by one. This does not, however, 
excuse students from courses required for the degree. 

It is the student's responsibility to keep informed on his honor-point 
standing. This information may be obtained at any time from the dean or 
director of the college, school, or division in which the student is registered. 
Requirements as to Residence: 

Students who come to the University from other colleges or universities 
are advised to make the transfer not later than the beginning of their third 
year and in no case will a student who matriculates in the University later 
than October 1 in any year be permitted to receive a degree at the next Com- 
mencement. 

In special cases students who desire to leave the University at the close 
of their third year to enter another institution with the purpose of taking a 



2 A11 applicants for certification are required to present an honor-point 
average of 1.2 in the first and second teaching- fields and in Education. 
aSee page 38. 



58 



General Information 



combined course leading to two degrees or of preparing for graduate study 
may, upon application beforehand to the Committee on Scholarship of the 
college or school in which they are registered, be permitted to do the work of 
the fourth year, or a. part thereof, at such other institution and to receive the 
bachelor's degree from the University upon the presentation of the proper 
credits. 

Except in the College of Law, no student will be granted a bachelor's 
degree by the University who has not done either a total of 90 hours or the 
last 30 hours of his work in actual residence at the University. 

No student may receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws without at least 
three semesters in residence at the College of Law and the successful com- 
pletion of courses aggregating at least one-half of the total number of hours 
required for graduation. 
Classification of Students: 

The following table shows the number of semester-hours required for 
classification as second-year, third-year, and fourth-year students and for 
graduation, according to the curricula in the several colleges, schools, and 
divisions. First-year students must satisfy the requirements for admission as 
set forth on pages 42 to 46 inclusive. 

Hours Required to Classify As 
COLLEGE AND DEGREE 

Hours 
Second- Third- Fourth- Required 
ARTS AND SCIENCES Year Year Year for 

Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) Student Student Student Degree 

Regular 25 58« 92 128 

Pre-Medical 32 58 96 128 

Combined (Medicine) i 32 58 96 132 

Combined (Law) 2 25 58 96 124 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

Business Administration 32 58 99 132 

Chemistry 34 58 103 136 

Combined (Medicine) 3 3;? 58 96 132 

Social Work 25 58 92 128 

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND 
HOME ECONOMICS 

B. S. (Bachelor of Science) 26 64 100 144 

B.S. in Agriculture (B. S.Agr.) 26 64 100 144 

B. S. in Forestry (B. S. F.) 30 70 110 150 

B. S. in Home Economics 

(B. S. H. FJ.) 25 58 92 128 

EDUCATION 4 

B. S. in Education (B. S. Ed.) 58 92 128 

ENGINEERING 6 

Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 27 60 94 133 

B. S. in Aero. Eng'g (B. S. A. E.) .... 30 72 112 152 

B. S. in Chem. Eng'g (B. S. Ch. E.) . . 30 72 112 152 

B. S. in Civil Eng'g (B. S. C. E.) 30 72 112 152 

^Fourth year in School of Medicine. 

-Fourth year in College of Law. 

"Third and fourth years in School of Medicine. 

*For the degme of Bachelor of Science in Education, at least 10 hours of the 
residence work must be in Education. 

•"•Students matriculating- with 58 or more hours of credit may graduate with 
148 hours, since physical education is not required of these students. 



REQUIREMl NTS TOR DEGREES 



59 



COLLEGE AND DEGREE 

Hours Required to Classify as 

Hours 
Second- Third- Fourth- Required 

Year Year Year for 

Student Student Student Degree 

B. S. in Elec. Eng'g (B. S. E. E.) 30 72 112 152 

B. S. in Mech. Eng'g (B. S. M. E.) 30 72 112 152 

JOURNALISM 

B. S. in Journalism (B. S. J.) 60 92 128 

LAW 

Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) 21 50 ... 81 

MEDICINE 

Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 

Medical Technician 25 58 107 141 

MINES 6 

B. S. in Eng'g of Mines 

(B. S. E. M.) 30 72 112 152 

MUSIC 

Bachelor of Music (B. Mus.) 30 64 102 136 

PHARMACY 

B. S. in Pharmacy (B. S. Phar.) 

Retail Pharmacy 30 70 108 142 

Industrial Pharmacy 30 70 108 144 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
ATHLETICS 
Bachelor of Science in Physical 

Education (B. S. P. E.) 28 58 92 128 

Work Done Out of Residence: 

It is the policy of the University to discourage the taking of regular resi- 
dence courses in absentia. In the case of courses begun at the University and 
not completed because of illness or for other acceptable reasons however, per- 
mission to complete the work in absentia under the direction of the regular 
University instructors giving the courses may be granted by the Committee on 
Scholarship; but in such case credit should be given only upon a report of a 
grade of no less than "C" on final examination. 

This regulation does not apply to University extension courses. 

Graduate Degrees 

Graduate degrees offered by the departments in the- University which 
have been approved for graduate work are as follows: 



Master of Arts (A. M.) 

Master of Music (Mus. M.) 

Master of Science (M. S.) 

Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M. S. Ch. E.) 

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M. S. E. E.) 

Master of Science in Civil Engineering (M. S. C. E.) 

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M. S. M. E.) 

Master of Science in Medical Biochemistry (M. S. Med. Biochem.) 

Master of Science in Engineering of Mines (M. S. E. M.) 

Master of Science in Home Economics Education (M. S. H. E. E.) 

Master of Science in Biochemistry (M.S.). 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) 



60 General Information 



Professional Degrees 

The following professional degrees are conferred upon graduates of the 
College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts of West Virginia University on 
the basis of practical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a 
thesis, and an oral final examination. 

Engineer of Mines (E. M.) Chemical Engineer (Ch. E.) 

Mechanical Engineer (M. E.) Civil Engineer (C. E.) 

Electrical Engineer (E. E.) 

The professional Certificate of Social Work is awarded to those who meet 
the following requirements: 

1. A minimum (including field work) of 30 semester hours of graduate 
social-work credit. 

2. A minimum of two semesters of supervised field work in selected social 
agencies (450 clock hours). 

3. A grade of C or better in all graduate work. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Courses 

As a rule all courses extend through one semester only. 1 

Examinations 

Mid-semester and Final Examinations: 

In practically all courses offered in the University, the student receives 
both a preliminary or mid-semester grade and a final grade. The mid-semester 
standing of a student is based on the daily recitation grades and a special 
test given during one or more regular recitation periods. Mid-semester grades 
are not entered on the Registrar's records. The final grade is based on the 
class standing for the entire semester and on a written final examination 2 to 
which a special period of two or three hours is devoted, except that the man- 
ner of determining the final grade of seniors and graduate students pro- 
visionally approved for graduation at the end of the semester or term is left 
with the head of the department. Any student not satisfied with his grade, 
however, has the right to take the examination with his class if he so desires. 
Examination Periods: 

Mid-semester examinations are held usually during the week of each 
semester immediately preceding the day of the mid-semester reports as set 
forth in the University Calendar. Final examinations are held during the last 
week of each semester of the academic year, and during the last two days of 
each term of the Summer Session. 
Absence from Examination: 

Students are required to take all regular examinations. If a student at- 
tends a course throughout the semester and is absent from examination with- 



in the College of Law all courses extend either through the entire year or 
through one semester. No credit will be given for less than an entire course 
except by special order of the Committee on Scholarship. Grades given at the 
end of the first semester in courses extending throughout the year are merely 
indicative of the quality of work done by the student to that point and do not 
give credit for the part of the course so far pursued. Such first-semester grades 
may be considered in determining the final grade. 

-See 12 percent rule under "Absences" on page 62. 



Examinations and Reports 61 

out permission, the instructor shall count the examination as zero and report 
the final grade as ' F". If. in the opinion oi" the instructor, the absence of the 
Ftudent was for satisfactory reason, the facet will be recorded on the stuudent's 
class ticket, the grade "I" will be returned, and the student may. upon ap- 
plication to the instructor, take the examination at a later date. 
Conditions and Failures: 

If the final grade of a student in any course is "F" it is recorded as a 
"failure," and the student must take the course again if he desires to receive 
credit for it. If the final grade is 'I" it is recorded as "incomplete." If a 
grade of "I" is not removed within the following semester by the satisfactory 
completion of the work of the course it become? a failure unless special per- 
mission to postpone the completion of the work is obtained from the Com- 
mittee on Scholarship of the college in which the student is registered. A 
student receiving a grade of "E" may be given a second examination in the 
subject in which such grade is received, provided he applies for it at the time 
of his registration. A grade of "E" not removed within the following semes- 
ter becomes a failure unless special permission to postpone the examination 
is obtained from the Committee on Scholarship of the college in which the 
student is registered. If the final grade after a second examination is again 
"E" it is recorded as a "failure.'' No grade higher than "C" shall be reported 
for the removal of a condition. In the College of Law a student who has re- 
ceived a grade of 'D" in any course is privileged, but not required, to take 
the next regular examination in that course in order to raise his grade to one 
which carries with it honor points. 

Reports 

Mid-semester grades are reported to students' advisers and to deans but 
are not recorded in the office of the Registrar. 

Final grades are reported by instructors to students' advisers and by 
them directly to the Registrars office. Final grades must be in the hands of 
the class adviser (semester) or the Registrar (summer term) 1 within 48 hours 
afte"r the closing hour of the examination. This rule also applies to the final 
grades of all students registered in other colleges or schools of the University 
who are enrolled in law courses. 

The final standing of all seniors provisionally approved for graduation 
shall be reported by their instructors to the deans or directors of their col- 
leges or schools, and the final standing of all graduate students provisionally 
approved for graduation shall be reported to the Chairman of the Graduate 
Council not later than the last day of recitation of the second semester. For 
this purpose special report cards are supplied by the Registrar. 

A report of each student's work is made at the close of the semester or 
Summer Session either to the student himself or to his parent or guardian. 

DISCIPLINE 

The rules and regulations which students are required to observe are few, 
simple, and reasonable: civil and orderly conduct; punctuality and regularity 



VFinal grades are reported by instructors to the Registrar at the end of each 
term of a Summer Session. 



62 General Information 



in attendance upon all required exercises; reasonable diligence in the per- 
formance of the work prescribed; and abstinence from vices. 

All matters of discipline are in charge of the Director of Student Affairs 
and the Committee on Discipline. No student may be expelled without the 
approval of the President of the University. 

Absences 

Each instructor shall be responsible for the attendance of students in his 
classes, and shall report an excessive number of absences to the dean or 
director of the college in which the student is registered for such action as 
may be deemed advisable. 

Students who must be absent from class for an extended period of time 
shall obtain permission for such absence from the dean .of the college in 
which they are enrolled. 

All women students who wish to be absent from Morgantown while the 
University is in session must obtain permission in advance from the office of 
the Dean of Women. 

If a student's absences in any course exceed 12 percent of the total num- 
ber of recitations in the course he is barred from taking the final examina- 
tion unless special permission to take such examination is given him by the 
clean or director of the college concerned and by the instructor. 

Delinquent Students 

The dean or director of each college shall make suitable and effective 
provisions for handling delinquent students registered in his college, subject 
to the general regulations. 
Probation and Suspension: 

Any student who at the end of any semester fails to make a passing 
grade in courses amounting to at least half of the total number of semester 
hours for which he is registered at the end of the second week following the 
date set for midsemester reports shall, unless restored to probationary stand- 
ing, be suspended from the University except that a freshman subject to the 
operation of this rule at the end of one semester in residence shall be placed 
on probation for the succeeding semester. If a student suspended under this 
rule is registered in the School of Medicine, his suspension becomes indefinite. 

A student who without permission withdraws from the University or from 
any class for which he is registered (FIW) shall, unless restored to proba- 
tionary standing, be suspended from the University. 

If a student suspended by operation of one of the above rules re-enters 
the University and again becomes subject to it, his suspension becomes in- 
definite. 

Any student who fails to make a passing grade in courses amounting to 
at least half of the total number of semester hours for which he is registered, 
at the end of the second week following the dare set tor midsemester reports, 
shall be placed on probation for the remainder of the semester. 

The dean or director of each college shall make periodic reports of the 
problems arising from delinquent students to the Council of Administration. 

All actions of the Committee on Scholarship and of the dean or director of 
the college that affect the standing of a student shall be reported by the dean 
to the Registrar. 



Discipline b3 



Duties of Instructors: 

Instructors shall report the names of delinquent students to their re- 
spective advisers at the beginning of each school month except the month in 
which a midsemester examination occurs and at such other times as the 
occasion may arise. 

In the event that a student who has not been previously reported for 
delinquency fails in a subject, the instructor must report to the student's 
dean or director the reason for the failure. 

No report should be made by an instructor until after a conference with 
the student. If the delinquency is a minor or temporary one, the instructor 
may await the result of his conference before reporting. Delinquency reports 
should include all failures to make a passing average and unsatisfactory work 
on the part of those who are capable of doing a higher grade of work. 

All reports shall be made on special blanks and a copy of the report 
should be given to the student. 
Duties of Advisers: 

All advisers, upon the receipt of the delinquent reports, shall have con- 
ferences with the students concerned and shall endeavor to make such recom- 
mendations and adjustments as may be within their power. 

If the delinquency is due to continued wilful neglect or to failure in one- 
half of the work for which the student is registered, the adviser shall report 
the case to the dean of his college, who may, at his discretion, place the 
student under the jurisdiction of the Committee on Scholarship, and there- 
after the adviser shall carry out the orders and instructions imposed by the 
dean or the committee. 
Duties of the Committee on Scholarship: 

The Committee on Scholarship shall have authority to proceed according 
to its best judgment in regard to delinquent students referred to it for its 
consideration. 

All orders of the committee shall become effective when approved by the 
dean of the college. 

In the exercise of its authority the Committee shall not suspend a student 
during a semester except for wilful neglect and in cases where the student's 
class grades are so low that further class attendance would be a waste of 
time. No suspension shall become effective until approved by the dean of 
the college. 

Student Marriages 

If any student under the age of 21 years, who has not been previously 
married, intends to marry within the school year, he or she must obtain the 
consent of the parents 1 or guardian before such marriage shall be solemnized, 
in accordance with the provisions of section 8, chapter 48, revised Official 
Code of West Virginia, 1931. 

In order to insure obedience to both the letter and the spirit of this 
statute and the policy of the University such student must, not less than one 
week before said marriage, show satisfactory evidence to the office of the 



l Or of the parent living, or, if the parents be living- separate and apart, of the 
one to whom was accorded the custody of such person. 



64 General Information 



Director of Student Affairs that the consent of the parents or guardian as 
required by the statute has been obtained. 

In the event that such student does not make such showing to the office 
of the Director of Student Affairs, regardless of where the marriage ceremony 
is performed, he or she shall, from the date of such marriage, be automatically 
suspended, and may only be reinstated upon showing satisfactory reason to 
the Council of Administration why he or she failed to comply with this 
regulation. 

Where both parties to the marriage are students and one has not com- 
plied with the above rule, both shall be suspended as provided above. 

STUDENT WELFARE 
Director of Student- Affairs 

The activities of student welfare are under the administration of the 
Director of Student Affairs. The Director's office is on the second floor of the 
Administration Building. 

Dean of Women 

All interests of the women students in the University are in charge of a 
special executive officer of the University, the Dean of Women. The Dean's 
office is on the main floor of Elizabeth Moore Hall. 

Convocation 

Convocations are held at such times as the Committee on Convocations 
and Public Exercises finds appropriate and desirable. Attractive programs 
are provided consisting of devotional exercises, addresses by distinguished 
speakers, and musical and other entertainment features of special merit. 

Social Center for Women 

On the upper campus, opposite Reynolds Hall, is Elizabeth Moore Hall 
for women, completed in 1928. The building provides for social, recreational, 
and physical education activities for women students and was named as a 
memorial to Mrs. Elizabeth I. Moore. The building is so arranged that facilities 
for social gatherings constitute a separate unit. 

Student Center 

The University Armory has been remodeled for use as a temporary stu- 
dent center offering dancing and other recreational facilities. The building is 
open as a student center from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through the week, and from 
2:00 to 6:00 p.m. on Sundays. The use of the student center for special group 
dances and programs on Friday and Saturday nights may be arranged through 
the Social Committee. 

Student Activities 

To be eligible to represent the University in public appearances, to hold a 
staff position on a student publication, to be a candidate for or to hold an office 
filled by an election conducted by A. W. S. or by the Student Council, or to be 
a regular member of the University band, a student must have earned at 



Student Welfare 6F» 



least 12 semester hours of credit and 12 honor points (Arts and Sciences 
standard) during his or her last previous semester in residence. This regula- 
tion was temporarily suspended during the war. 
Associated Women Students: 

All women students of the University are members of the Associated 
Women Students. The purpose of this association is to regulate all matters 
pertaining to the student life of its members; to further in every way a spirit 
of friendliness and unity among the women of the University; to increase 
their sense of responsibility; and to be a medium for maintaining high schol- 
astic and social standards. 

The responsibility for directing the work of the Association rests with the 
Executive Council, which is composed of the following members: a president, 
two vice-presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and a representative from each 
class. These officers are elected annually by the Association. 

In 1921 the Association was admitted to active membership in the inter- 
collegiate Association of Student Government for Women Students. 

Religious Foundations and Societies 

Foundations: 

As at most state university centers, various state and national church 
boards have established foundations at West Virginia University for the 
religious education and nurture of students. Individual faculty men act a- 
advisers. The churches of Morgantown extend a warm welcome to students 
of all faiths. The physical plant and equipment of each church is available for 
social, educational, and recreational activities of students. 

Newman Hall, 481 University avenue, is the social and religious center 
established by the West Virginia Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church for 
students of that and other faiths. Rev. Joseph Wanstreet is the resident 
chaplain. Newman Hall is a beautiful building of English collegiate archi- 
tecture immediately adjacent to the Campus. It is equipped with dormitory 
facilities for 20 students and also includes a chapel, dining room, lounge, 
game room, and library. 

Trinity Church, Spruce Street, is the center for student work sponsored 
by the Diocese of West Virginia of the Protestant Episcopal Church and the 
Church Society for College Work. This work is under the direction of the 
rector, Rev. Harold M. Wilson, and the director of student work, C. H. McCarty. 

The program includes corporate student worship services, meetings of the 
Canterbury Club, which is one of the National Association of Canterbury 
Clubs, for discussion and fellowship, and a college chapter of the Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew, which conducts a mission project in the territory surrounding 
Morgantown and sponsors a young men's Bible class at Trinity Church. The 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew is a world-wide organization of young men in the 
Anglican Communion who have dedicated themselves to the spread of Christ's 
Kingdom. 

The Presbyterian Student Service Project represents the cooperative 
efforts of the National Boards of Christian Education and Home Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., and of the Synod of West Virginia of the 
Presbyterian Church, U. S., to make the Christian religion a vital factor in 



66 General Information 



the experiences of students and in the relationships which these students sus- 
tain while in the University; and also, through guided Christian activities in 
the mine-camp communities surrounding Morgantown, to train among edu- 
cated men and women future Christian statesmen. The Rev. Win. C. Swartz, 
304 Willey Street, is the student pastor and director; Dr. Wm. E. Brooks, 316 
Allison Street, is the minister of the church. 

Wesley Foundation, 503 High Street, is a center for Methodist students. 
There are three attractive rooms, a kitchenette, and an office. The students 
are organized into a working cabinet and carry forward a religious educational 
program consisting of worship, study, fellowship, community service, mining- 
camp missions, and other extension activities. The program is under the 
direction of Dr. W. S. Boyd, pastor of Wesley Church, with Robert R. Sanks 
assigned by the West Virginia Conference of the church as associate director 
in charge of student activities. 

The Baptist student Christian work headquarters are at the First Baptist 
Church under the direction of Rev. Val H. Wilson as State Director of Baptist 
student work and student pastor. Dr. O. O. Dietz is pastor of the church. 
The program includes participation in Bible School, worship services of the 
church, B. Y. F., and service in mission churches in nearby districts. Student 
activities are democratically organized and depend in large measure on 
student initiative and leadership. 

The Hillel Foundation Extension Unit, Jewish Center, 240 High Street, 
of West Virginia University represents the combined efforts of the West Vir- 
ginia B'nai B'rith Lodges and of the West Virginia State Federation of 
Temple Sisterhoods to bring the University's students together in religious, 
cultural, and social activities. The Foundation is under the direction of Rabbi 
Justin Hofmann, spiiitual leader of the Tree of Life Congregation in Morgan- 
town. Prominent lecturers and speakers are featured at regular intervals 
by the Foundation for the members of the group and for the general student 
body. 

Other churches, while not having special buildings or workers for 
University students, make definite contributions in ministering to the religious 
and social needs of University students who belong to their particular faiths. 
It should be stated in this connection that college students are welcome in 
all of our churches regardless of what their church affiliations may be, or 
indeed whether they have any. 
Societies: 

Young Women's Christian Association is a voluntary group of women in 
the University organized for the purpose of promoting and directing widely 
varied activities for a religious motive. Through its national and interna- 
tional organization, the Y. W. C. A. joins in fellowship with students throughout 
the world. Membership in the Campus organization is open to all women 
students in the University who are in agreement with its purpose. The 
Y. W. C. A. headquarters are located on the second floor of Elizabeth Moore 
Hall, and Mrs. Eleanor Wirth directs the activities of the organization. 

Church organizations. The following organizations have been established 
by Morgantown churches for the purpose of providing wholesome social activ- 
ities for the students: Kappa Phi and Delta Sigma Theta — Methodist; West- 
minster Girls' Club — Presbyterian; Theta Epsilon — Baptist. 



Physical Education and Athletics 67 

Student Social Life 

The social life of the students in the University is under the general 
supervision of the Committee on Social Affairs. This Committee has super- 
vision of every social function given hy the University or by an organization 
within it. including fraternities, sororities, and other student societies. Such 
social functions as dances picnics, excursions, and receptions are supervised 
by this Committee. 

The University Young Men's Christian Association of West Virginia 
University is a nonsectarian fellowship of students and faculty united in the 
desire to encourage all-around personal and social development in the light 
of religious principles. Student officers, a student cabinet, a board of directors, 
and a full-time general secretary direct its activities. The various committees, 
commissions, and interest groups provide not only their immediate ends but 
also abundant opportunity for fellowship and leadership training. The YMCA 
office is located on the second floor of the Administration Building with Wil- 
liam H. Henderson the General Secretary. The Association is affiliated with 
the world-wide YMCA movement and with the Student Christian Movements. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 
Service Programs for Men and Women 

Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the first 
year in residence; and four hours of physical education for women, to be 
taken during the first and second year in residence, are required for gradua- 
tion of students presenting fewer than 58 hours, unless previous credit has 
been allowed. 

Each student who is required to register for physical education is given 
a complete medical and physical examination at the beginning of the Uni- 
versity school year to determine his fitness for active participation in Univer- 
sity activities of any description. See Part III for more extended information 
on the course offerings of these departments. 

Intramural Sports 

Intramural Sports for Men: 

The department of intramural sports for men is organized as one of the 
departments of the School of Physical Education and Athletics. It is the aim 
of this department to encourage the entire student body of the University to 
participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome, active recreation. 
Competition will be promoted between student groups, faculty groups, and 
individuals. The units which are now the natural groups on campus, such as 
class, fraternity, and unorganized or non-fraternity groups, will form the 
basis for activities in competitive sports and recreation. It is the desire of the 
department to foster a spirit of fair play and good sportsmanship in all 
competition. 

All students regularly enrolled in any department in the University shall 
be eligible to enjoy the intramural privileges, except that they must satisfy 
certain eligibility requirements for the various activities. All students who 
are members of the Varsity or freshman squads in a sport, or who have 



68 General Information 



earned a Varsity award (WV) in a sport, shall be ineligible for intramural 
competition in that particular sport. All students who have won a Varsity 
award in a sport from another institution of college rank shall be ineligible 
for intramural competition in that particular sport. Winning a Varsity award 
in one sport such as basketball will not bar a student from participation in 
another intramural sport such as baseball. See Bulletin of the Department of 
Intramural Sports. 

All competitions conducted by the department are under the control of the 
Administrative Board composed of the Dean of the School of Physical Edu- 
cation and Athletics, Director of Intramural Sports, Director of the Service 
Program for Men, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Supervisor of Activi- 
ties, and the senior managers. The coaches of the various Varsity sports are 
ex officio members of the Administrative Board and vote on questions of eli- 
gibility or protests which concern the particular sport they may coach. 

The following activities are conducted during the fall season: speedball, 
touch football, badminton, volleyball, and handball. Other activities may be 
promoted during this season when there is sufficient interest on the part of 
the students and where facilities are available. Leagues will be organized to 
accommodate classes, fraternities, and non-fraternity or unorganized groups. 

The following activities are conducted during the winter season: basket- 
ball, indoor track, ping-pong, relays, bowling, and basketball free-throwing. 

The following activities are conducted during the spring season: softball, 
horseshoes, and outdoor track. 
Intramural Sports for Women: 

The Women's Recreation Association, together with the department of 
service program for women of the School of Physical Education and Athletics, 
sponsors the intramural athletic activities for women. It is the aim of these 
two groups to encourage all women students to participate in organized 
sports as a recreational activity. Competition takes place between the organ- 
ized groups on the Campus such as sorority, dormitory, church, independent, 
and class groups. 

All women enrolled in the University are eligible to play in any intra- 
mural tournament. The number of physical education majors permitted to 
play on any one team is restricted. Interclass tournaments in volleyball, 
basketball, and baseball are held each year for the professional students in 
physical education. 

The following activities are conduucted during the fall season: field 
hockey, soccer, horseshoes, tennis, and volleyball; during the winter season: 
badminton, foul-throwing, swimming, basketball, bowling, tumbling, and table 
tennis; during the spring season: softball and archery. As the demand for 
more activities develops, the facilities will be increased and the program 
broadened. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

The activities of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics are admin- 
istered by the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and by the Athletic Council. 
The council is composed of eight members: four faculty, two alumni, one stu- 
dent, and one member of the Board of Governors (ex ofiicio). The Dean of the 



The 1'mvi:iisiu Health Service CD 

School of Physical Education and Athletics serves as a member, and the 
Director of Athletics is the executive officer. Instruction and training are given 
each year in the seasonal sports such as football and cross-country; basketball, 
boxing, and wrestling; baseball, track, tennis, and golf. Matters concerning 
Uhletic eligibility are decided by the Athletic Council, and scholastic eligibility 
regulations are established by the Faculty of the University. 

THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE 

The University Health Service, which is a part of the organization of 
the School of Medicine, is maintained to provide medical service to the 
students of the University and to supervise general health conditions on the 
Campus. The staff includes four physicians, two nurses, and a laboratory 
technician, together with the required clerical personnel. The University 
Pharmacy, where students may obtain medicine, is managed by the College 
of Pharmacy. The departments of pathology and bacteriology cooperate in 
the laboratory examination of diagnostic materials. 

The Health Service occupies a well-designed University Health Center 
constructed in 1941. This three-story building is centrally located on the 
Campus, fronting on College Avenue adjacent to Reynolds Hall. It is built 
of brick and concrete and is fireproof throughout. On the first floor are the 
treatment and operating rooms, offices, and pharmacy. The second floor is 
occupied by the pathology and X-ray departments, together with the depart- 
ment of pathology. Physicians are in attendance during the regular session 
from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon daily except Sunday, and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
daily except Saturday afternoon and Sunday. Medical aid may be obtained at 
any time by calling Extension 123 on the University exchange. The Univer- 
sity Pharmacy is open from 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon and 2:00 to 5:00 p. m. 

Each regularly enrolled University student pays a fee which provides 
for medical consultation and advice from the University physicians. Moderate 
additional charges are made for room calls, X-rays, laboratory tests, minor 
operations, treatment of fractures, intravenous treatment, and drugs fur- 
nished by the pharmacy. 

When a student enters the University for the first time, he receives a 
complete physical examination which includes a blood test, urine analysis, 
and tuberculin test. The Health Service also gives special physical examina- 
tions to students in competitive athletics, to University food handlers, to 
employees of buildings and grounds, and to other groups as occasion may 
arise. 

Student Hospital Service 

Each full-time student of West Virginia University shall have added to 
his regular semester fees a hospital fee of fifty cents ($0.50) per semester, for 
which he shall be furnished hospital care as hereinafter provided in either 
the Heiskell Memorial Hospital, Morgantown, West Virginia, or the Monon- 
galia General Hospital, Morgantown, as ordered by a physician of the Health 
Service of West Virginia University, subject to the approval of the Director 
of the Student Health Service. Students in the Summer Sessions shall not be 
covered by this contract. 



70 General Information 



In the event of acute illness or accidental injury which necessitates hos- 
pitalization, each student shall be entitled to receive hospital service in either 
hospital mentioned above. Hospital service shall include room accommoda- 
tion, meals, general nursing care, hypodermics, use of operating room, three 
X-ray examinations to one illness, ailment, or injury, as ordered by the 
attending" physician during hospitalization, routine laboratory service as 
ordered by the attending physician during hospitalization, routine medicines 
and dressings as supplied by the hospital, plaster casts, and all routine hos- 
pital service. 

Hospital service to be supplied shall not include the following: 

Vaccines, serums, X-ray therapy, artificial eyes, orthopedic appliances, 
crutches, diagnostic dental X-ray, or basal metabolism. 

Hospital care shall not be furnished in the following cases: 

Injuries resulting from brawls, strikes, riots, or insurrection; wilfully 
self-inflicted injuries; acute venereal diseases; insanity; drug addiction; alco- 
holism; and pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Hospital care herein provided for shall be furnished only to students who 
pay full fees and not to part-time students. 

Students registering for the first semester of the academic year shall 
receive benefits from the date of registration to twelve o'clock midnight of the 
last day of registration for the second semester. Students registering for the 
second semester of the academic year shall receive benefits from the date of 
registration to twelve o'clock midnight of "the day on which Commencement 
Exercises are held, or the closing day of the semester if this day is not prior 
to Commencement Day. In case of accidental injury or emergency illness 
while traveling outside the area served by the Hospital Service, and where 
the student of necessity shall have to be cared for in a hospital having no 
connection with the Hospital Service, then the Hospital Service shall allow 
$5.00 a day for a period not to exceed 10 days for all services received in 
such hospital. Students shall be eligible for hospital benefits described as 
above only so long as they are members in good standing of West Virginia 
University: i.e., should a student be dropped from the University register for 
any reason, his contract shall be cancelled automatically and his hospital fee 
forfeited. 

Each student shall be entitled to an aggregate of thirty days of hospitaliza- 
tion during each school year, provided, however, that in case of continuing 
illness, if hospitalization should be begun during a given semester or term but 
not completed by the end of such semester or term, the student shall be en- 
titled, in the aggregate, to the same period of hospitalization to which he would 
have been entitled if he had completed it during such semester or term. 

Should a student remain in a hospital after having been discharged as a 
hospital patient by the attending physician, such student shall be responsible 
to the hospital for the payment of its regular charges for hospitalization 
after the date of such discharge, and the Hospital Service shall not be liable 
therefor. This however shall not prevent the student from again entering a 
hospital for the remainder of the thirty days as herein provided. 

Should a student receive hospital service by reason of accidental injuries 
suffered through the fault or negligence of another party, and the expenses of 



Employment and Placement Services 71 

such injuries be collected by suit or settlement, then said student shall reim- 
burse the Hospital Service; or should part of the expenses of such hospital 
services be collected by suit or settlement on account of such injuries, then 
said student shall reimburse the Hospital Service to the extent that such 
expenses may be so collected. 

EMPLOYMENT AND PLACEMENT SERVICE 

Student Employment: 

Students desiring part-time work may register with H. E. Stone, Secre- 
tary of Loans and Placement, either before arrival in Morgantown or after 
enrollment. 

Until the successful completion of at least one semester's regular Uni- 
versity curricular work, freshmen should not attempt outside work in self- 
support unless absolutely necessary. Only the exceptional student can engage 
in such work or activities during the first semester without danger to his 
scholastic status. 

The Senior and Graduate Placement Service: 

The University Placement Service for non-teaching positions is in charge 
of H. E. Stone, Secretary of Loans and Placement. Alumni, seniors, drop-outs, 
and other students desiring pre-placement guidance or placement assistance 
may avail themselves of these services. 

This bureau in Room 207, Administration Building, registers candidates 
for positions, interviews registrants, analyzes the changing markets for gradu- 
ates, studies the policies and practices ot employers in dealing with the college 
product, arranges interviews between employers and candidates, aids students 
with regard to the techniques of the employment interview, assists graduates 
seeking promotion or change of position, cooperates with veterans and with 
individuals and agencies interested in assisting them, and engages in continu- 
ous research in the interest of improving these services. 

Contacts with employers have resulted in increased visits to the campus 
by employment representatives of corporations aud in saving time for these 
representatives on the occasion of their visits. 

The Placement Service works aggressively to supplement, stimulate, and 
extend placement activities in the University. The U. S. Civil Service, em- 
ployment agencies, leading corporations, and the departments, divisions, and 
colleges of the University cooperate freely with the central placement service. 
Standard placement application forms are supplied on request. 

Pre-placement and Placement Guidance: 

Educational and occupational guidance in the earlier college years shade 
off into direct placement guidance and assistance during the senior year and in- 
to follow-up or occupational adjustment service after graduation. A placement 
guidance service is therefore maintained, including an occupational informa- 
tion bureau with a large and expanding collection of books, booklets, leaflets, 
and other material on careers open to university-trained men and women. 
An extensive file of company booklets and magazines, federal bulletins, and 
Civil Service announcements is also availahle for consultation by registrants. 



72 General Information 



The Teacher-Placement Bureau: 

The College of Education, in cooperation with other units of the Uni- 
versity, maintains a Teacher-Placement Bureau which makes available to 
school officials the credentials of students and alumni who are candidates for 
school positions. The facilities of the Bureau are available to students in both 
the regular and Summer Sessions. No charge is made for this service. 

Blanks for registration will be furnished upon application. The regular 
annual enrollment in the Bureau takes place the second week in February. 

While a conscientious effort is made to place all worthy applicants, no 
one is assured a position. General letters of recommendation are not given 
to candidates. Information in the files of the Bureau is regarded as confi- 
dential. The Bureau cannot undertake to furnish copies of its records to 
commercial or other private placement bureaus. 
The Pharmacists' Register: 

A pharmacists' register for the benefit of both the employer and em- 
ployee has been established by the College of Pharmacy. No charge is made 
for services rendered. 

GIFTS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

Several individuals, as well as national patriotic, educational, fraternal, 
and religious organizations, have established scholarships, loan funds, prizes, 
trophies, and medals for students in the University. 

Gifts 

Carnegie Corporation Music Collection — Thanks to the generosity of the 
Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, West Virginia University 
in 1936 received as a gift, designed to stimulate and develop an interest in 
music culturally on the part of the entire student body, a Music Collection 
that cost the corporation $2,500. The set includes: 

An electric phonograph of special design for use in small rooms and 
auditoriums; approximately 900 records, chosen as an anthology of recorded 
music, ancient and modern, from oriental and occidental countries; an oak 
cabinet with approximately 75 buckram albums in which to keep the records; 
a duplicate set of printed 3"x5" card indexes of all records in the set, classi- 
fied by composers, titles, mediums, forms, etc.; bound copies of full scores, 
when published in miniature, also bound vocal scores of operas and oratorios, 
which are included for all completely recorded works in the set; lastly, a 
selection of about 100 books on musical subjects, historical and biographical, 
and works of reference. 

This Music Collection is attractively housed in Elizabeth Moore Hall and 
its use is administered under regulations designed to make it of greatest pos- 
sible value to the students of the University. 

Scholarships 

American Bankers Association Foundation for Education in Economics 
Loan Scholarships — The American Bankers Association Foundation for Edu- 
cation in Economics has assigned to West Virginia University three scholar- 
ships of $250 each. These scholarships will be "awarded only to deserving 



Gifts, Scholarships, and Loan Funds 73 



students of integrity, intelligence, character, competency, and aptitude, whose 
means of support are dependent wholly or in part on their own labor, to 
enable them Lo continue the study of courses in banking and economics in 
classes of junior grade or above. Scholarship of the highest rank will not be 
a definite requirement for a loan scholarship award; however, the Foundation 
desires to encourage students who will become leaders in professional or busi- 
ness life and does not wish loan scholarships granted to mediocre or inferior 
students." The holders of these scholarships are eligible for one reappoint- 
ment. The loan is without interest until the first day of the second January 
after the recipient leaves the University. Beginning on that date interest 
accrues at the rate of five (5%) percent per year, and repayment of both 
principal and interest in sums of no less than $10 monthly must likewise 
then begin. 

Walter Haines South Memorial Scholarship — To perpetuate the name of 
her deceased brother, a graduate of the University, Mrs. Frederick J. Knutti 
of Morgantown has created The Walter Haines South Memorial Scholarship. 
This scholarship, open to deserving men, involves a total of $500 per annum. 
This fund has been placed in the hands of the West Virginia University 
Student Loan Fund Corporation for administration. Under the plan of opera- 
tion of this fund, some one person will be selected who will receive the entire 
amount of this scholarship fund, without interest, while he is an undergraduate. 
The amount lent will be repaid over a period of four years after graduation. 

The Board of Governors Scholarships — On April 5, 1945, the Board of Gov- 
ernors of West Virginia University authorized the establishment of 25 schola- 
ships to be awarded annually to high-school graduates. The first awards were 
made Tor the academic year 1946-47. The scholarships entitle recipients to re- 
mission of all fees, except those payable to state special funds and those charge- 
able to Special Services. Awards are made on the basis of (1) scholastic at- 
tainment, (2) citizenship, loyalty, and personality, (3) character and leadership, 
and (4) extra-curricular abilities. Applications for these scholarships are made 
through the Board of Governors' Scholarship Committee and scholarships are 
awarded on recommendation of the committee and on approval by the Board of 
Governors. Scholarships remain in effect for four academic years unless revoked 
for disciplinary reasons, for failure to maintain scholastic standard, or because of 
withdrawal from the University. 

The Board of Governors Scholarships in Music — One of these scholarships, 
is to be awarded in the department of voice, one in the department of violin, 
and one in the department of piano. There will be both preliminary and final 
contests in voice, in violin, and in piano. Those eligible to take part in the 
contests will be West Virginia high-school seniors who give promise of be- 
coming eligible for regular enrollment in the School of Music of West Virginia 
University as candidates for a degree in applied music. Each scholarship to 
be awarded is to consist of exemption from payment of the contingent fee 
($30 each semester) for the four academic years, beginning in the autumn 
immediately following graduation from high school and the winning of the 
scholarship. 

The holder of a scholarship must maintain each semester a record of 
achievement deemed by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Music to 



74 General Information 



be worthy of continuance of the award. Preliminary and final contests will be 
held in Morgantown, on the campus of West Virginia University, and the 
dates will be announced. 

Charles Irwin Travelli Scholarship — This scholarship amounts to $250 a 
year and permits the holding student to devote his entire time to his Uni- 
versity course. 

Victor E. Albright Scholarship — This scholarship is worth $200 per year 
and is to be awarded "to a boy or girl of good character, of fair health and of 
the White race, who was born and reared in Preston county and who gradu- 
ated from a high school of Preston county in the year in which the scholar- 
ship is given." 

Scholarship in Public Speaking — To the winner of first place in each of 
the four events (debate, oration, extempore speaking and poetry reading) in 
the West Virginia Interscholastic Public Speaking Contest will be awarded a 
iour-year scholarship in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University. 

The Elizabeth Davis Richards Scholarship in English and Poetry — In 
memory of ElJ^abeth Davis Richards, well-known West Virginia authoress 
and patron of ?the English Club, an annual scholarship in the amount of $50.00 
was establishes by Mr. Del Roy Richards of Morgantown in December, 1936, 
to be awarded to some worthy upper-division or graduate student in the 
department of English. 

The John Barton Payne Scholarship — The Hon. John Barton Payne, native 
of Taylor county and late president of the American Red Cross, bequeathed 
to the University the sum of $12,000, the income from which is to be used to 
aid two young men — one a native of Taylor county, the other a native of 
Preston county — to attend the University. Financial need and scholastic merit 
are prime considerations in making the award. 

The Sears Roebuck Agricultural Foundation Scholarships — A grant to 
the College of Agriculture of $2,000 from the Sears Roebuck Agricultural 
Foundation of Chicago makes possible the awarding of scholarships each 
year to upwards of 16 needy, deserving farm boys enrolling as freshmen in 
agriculture. Individual scholarships amount to $125 per year. 

The selection of the recipients of each of the scholarships is made by the 
dean and faculty of the College of Agriculture. 

The Richard Aspinall Scholarship — This scholarship was established in 
1944 by the Morgantown, West Virginia, Moose Lodge. It pays for the tuition, 
books, room, and board for four years in any undergraduate college on this 
Campus that the high-ranking student of Mooseheart, Illinois, may elect. 

The Southern States Cooperative Scholarship — Each year the most out- 
standing high-school student in vocational agriculture who is also a member 
of the West Virginia chapter, Future Farmers of America, and who matricu- 
lates in the College of Agriculture will receive a scholarship award of $100 
from the Southern States Cooperative, Inc. 

The Junior League Scholarship — This scholarship, providing $150 a 
year for a graduate social-work student, was established in 1942. It is jointly 
supported by the five leagues of the state. Applicants must be residents of 
West Virginia, and all applications must be addressed to the head of the 
department of social work. 



Gifts, Scholarships, and Loan Funds 75 

I 

The Hoard of Governors Latin-American Scholarships- -These two schol- 
arships are available to Latin-American students for full-time graduate work 
in the Department of Social Work. They are equivalent to annual non-resident 
tuition fees; and recipients are selected by the head of the department. 

|_West Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs Pan-American Scholarship — 
The winner of this scholarship is remitted tuition fees. 

The West Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs Scholarship— This schol- 
arship provides $300 a year and is awarded to a full-time student in the 
Department of Social Work. The recipient, selected by the head of the depart- 
ment, must be a resident of West Virginia. 

The Morgantown Service League Scholarship — This scholarship provides 
$150 a year for a full-time student in the Department of Social Work. The 
student must be a resident of the state and approved by the head of the 
department. 

The State Department of Public Assistance Scholarships — These social 
work scholarships, ranging from small sums up to a maximum of $110 a month 
for six months, are available to selected employees of the department who 
hold an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university. Appli- 
cation for these scholarships must be made to the chief of the Division of 
Social Services or to the chief of the Division of Child Welfare of the State 
Department of Public Assistance, Charleston. Such students must also be 
approved by the head of the Department of Social Work. 

The pharmacists of West Virginia, individually and- collectively, have 
provided a number of scholarships in the amount of $150 per year for capable 
high-school graduates needing financial assistance to assist in their pharma- 
ceutical education. The final selections of these scholarships are made by a 
committee of the West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association. Additional 
information may be obtained from the dean of the College of Pharmacy. 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education — This founda- 
tion, in order -to stimulate an interest for pharmacy as a profession among 
capable high-school graduates, has assigned several scholarships to the College 
of Pharmacy. Each scholarship or grant covers tuition fees for one year. 
Selections for the awards are made by the faculty of the College and are 
awarded on the basis of scholarship and financial need. The holder may be 
eligible for reappointment. Additional information may be obtained from the 
dean of the College. 

The School of Journalism Scholarships — Six scholarships in journalism 
of $100 each are awarded annually to pre-journalism freshmen and sopho- 
mores and to professional juniors and seniors on the basis of ability, scholastic 
achievement, and promise for a successful journalistic career. Scholarship 
holders are eligible for reappointment. These scholarships were established 
in 1945. Two of them are known as the Daily Mail Scholarships and were 
established by Walter E. Clark and Fred M. Stanton of the Charleston Daily 
Mail. Two are known as the Lewis Baker Scholarships and were established 
by Mrs. Guy Despard Goff of New York City in memory of Lewis Baker, her 
father, who was a newspaper executive in Wheeling. The other two are 
known as the Ogden Scholarships and were established by the News Publish- 
ing Company of Wheeling in honor of the late H. C. Ogden, publisher and 



General Information 



alumnus. These scholarships are awarded upon the recommendation of the 
School of Journalism. 

The R. M. Davis Scholarship in Political Science — Mr. R. M. Davis, Mor- 
gantown, West Virginia, coal operator, has given to the University the sum 
of $5,000 to establish a scholarship in the Department of Political Science. 
The scholarship with an average annual value of between $300 and $500 will 
be granted to an undergraduate or graduate student registered in the Depart- 
ment of Political Science whose specialty is international relations. The staff 
of the department will select the winner. Scholastic standing and qualities 
of leadership will be given primary consideration in awarding the scholarship. 
Any West Virginia University student whose major is in political science 
and who is interested in being considered for this scholarship should write 
directly to the head of the Department of Political Science. 

The Kroger Company Scholarship — The Kroger Company will give three 
scholarships of $200 each, to be divided between agriculture (one) and home 
economics (two). Awards on the basis of scholarship and leadership in school, 
church, F. F. A., F. H. A., 4-H, and other youth activities will be made by the 
Scholarship Committee of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and H'ltne 
Economics. 

Loan Funds 

*The following loan funds are administered through the office of the 
Secretary of Loans and Placement with the cooperation of advisory commit- 
tees, University officials, and alumni. Applications may be filed with Mr. Stone, 
207 Administration Building. 

The J. D. Finley Fund — A fund of $1,000 was contributed to the University 
by the trustees of the estate of the Hon. J. D. Finley of Pittsburgh, Pa., in 
accordance with his last will and testament, to be used as loans to deserving 
students in the School of Medicine. 

The Theodore Smith Fund — On April 13, 1930, Theodore Smith was 
drowned in the Monongahela River. His tragic death disclosed the fact that 
he was being financed through the University by the late Hon. James Elwood 
Jones. He had taken out a life insurance policy of $2,000 with Mr. Jones as 
beneficiary. In deference to the memory of Theodore Smith, Mr. Jones turned 
the $2,000 over to the University for the establishment of the Theodore 
Smith Fund. 

The Revolving Emergency Fund for Men — A fund to meet emergencies 
of University men was established in October, 1931. The principal of this 
fund amounts to about $3,000. H. E, Stone, founder of the fund, is treasurer. 
Loans are made in small amounts and for short periods of time. About 2,400 
loans have been made from this fund since it was established. In 15 years its 
loans have aggregated approximately $25,000. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Fund — A special fund for small loans 
to students registered in the College of Agriculture has been established by 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, The Secretary of Loan Funds acts as 
treasurer of this fund. 

The Chauncey Watson Boucher Fund — This fund was established in 1936 
by former President C. S. Boucher in memory of his father. Seniors from 



Gifts, Scholarships, and Loan Funds 77 

West Virginia may borrow only for the payment of University fees. Loans 
must be repaid within two years and are without interest. 

The Charles E. Lawall Fund— Established in 1939 for small loans to 
worthy students in need of aid; available to students whose scholastic record 
has been satisfactory; interest payable only for periods in excess of time for 
which the loan is granted. 

Alfred Walker Fund — a special fund for loans to Pharmacy students, 
established in 1938 by Dean J. Lester Hayman in honor of the memory 
of Mr. Alfred Walker of Sutton, first president of the West Virginia Pharma- 
ceutical Association and, for many years, secretary of the State Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

The John W. Davis fund, established for the making of loans to out- 
standing law students, aids worthy students each year. 

The P. C. Thomas Fund — In May 1943 the P. C. Thomas loan fund was 
established in memory of the late P. C. Thomas of the Koppers Coal Company. 
The initial contribution made by employees of the Company was $520. 

The Kellogg Foundation Fund — The Kellogg Foundation in 1942 allotted 
$5,000 to West Virginia University for loans to students in the School of 
Medicine. Loans from this fund may not exceed $150 during any academic 
year. The total loan to one student may not exceed $250. Interest is charged 
at the rate of 2 percent. Students may not borrow until after the successful 
compleion of one term in the School of Medicine. 

The Leon Leonian Memorial Fund — Established in July 1945 in honor of 
the memory of Dr. Leon H. Leonian. Small loans are made to students for 
short periods without interest. More than 50 students have already been helped 
by this fund. 

The Loyalty Permanent Endowment Loan Fund of the W. V. U. Alumni 
Association — This fund was established some years ago by contributions of 
alumni and other friends of the University. It is a permanent trust fund, 
the income of which is available to worthy students. 

West Virginia State Conference of Social Work Fund— In 1940 the State 
Conference of Social Work established a student loan fund for the department 
of social work, such fund to be granted, without interest, to eligible full-time 
graduate social-work students who are residents of West Virginia. 

Many off-campus loan funds cooperate with the Office of the Secretary 
of Loans and Placement. These include the funds of various Masonic and 
other fraternal bodies, social fraternities, civic clubs, church boards, religious 
associations, and other organizations. The Morgantown Rotary Club fund has 
also aided many men by small loans in emergencies. Information concerning 
those funds may be obtained from the Secretary of Loans and Placement. 

PRIZES, TROPHIES, AND MEDALS 

Prizes 

Awards for prizes in the University are made in accordance with the 
following rules: 

No composition, in whole or in part, shall be submitted in competition 
for two prizes. 



78 General Information 



Only students pursuing courses leading to baccalaureate degrees are 
eligible for any prize offered, except for tbe James F. Brown prize. 

No student shall be eligible to enter any contest who has not been a resi- 
dent student in this University for at least one semester preceding the semester 
in which the contest is to be held, and who, unless he be a competitor for the 
James F. Brown prize, is not a resident student in good standing in the 
University in the semester in which the contest is held. 

No successful contestant may become for a second time a competitor for 
the same prize. 

If in any contest the judges find no manuscript of sufficient merit, there 
shall be no award of the prize for that year. 

Students intending to compete in any essay-writing contest must notify 
the chairman of the Committee on Prizes not later than March 15. Three 
typewritten copies of each essay must be in the hands of the chairman of 
the committee not later than May 15. 

The conditions upon which the awards in the several contests are made 
may be learned upon application to the office of the Director of Student 
Affairs or to the members of the Committee on Prizes. 

The Tax Commission Prize — The honorable members of the State Tax 
Commission of 1902, namely, W. P. Hubbard, Henry G. Davis, John K. Thomp- 
son, L. J. Williams, and J. H. Holt, gave the sum of $1,350, later increased by 
unawarded sums to $1,500, the income of which is to be used annually as a 
prize for the "best original work bearing on matters of taxation in West Vir- 
ginia." The conditions of the competition are determined by the Council of 
Administration. The amount of the prize at present is $50. The subject as- 
signed for 1947-48 is "Valuation of property for state tax purposes in West 
Virginia." 

The James F. Brown Prize — The Hon. James F. Brown, an alumnus of 
the University, "with a desire to stimulate the young men of the State to 
fuller consideration of the 'inalienable right' of mankind, and especially those 
guaranteed by the Constitution of the State and the United States," has 
contributed $5,000 to the University, the income of which is to be "used as a 
prize for the best essay or paper each year on the subject of the individual 
liberties of the citizen as guaranteed by the Constitution." The income may 
be given as a single prize, or it may be divided into a first and second prize. 
For the present the award will be made as a single prize, $200 in amount. 
Any regularly enrolled student in any school or college of the University or 
any student within one year after receiving an undergraduate degree may 
compete for this prize. Graduates of the College of Law or of the School of 
Medicine or holders of any post-graduate degree are not eligible to compete 
tor this prize. The subject assigned for 1947-48 is "The constitutional status of 
political parties and their members." 

The West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association Prize — The West 
Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association offers to the student making the 
best set of drawings in Pharmacy 10 a two-year, paid-up membership in the 
American Pharmaceutical Association. 

The Waitman Barbe Memorial Prize — The English Club of West Virginia 
University offers an annual prize of $25 in memory of Waitman Barbe, poet, 



Prizes, Trophies, and Medals 79 



scholar, and adviser of the English Club during his long term of service on 
the faculty. The prize is awarded to some student regularly enrolled as a 
junior or senior in West Virginia University, for creative work in the field 
of literature, either in prose or poetry or both. The minimum length of such 
composition must be 4,000 words in prose or 100 lines in poetry. 

The Board of Governors Military Essay Prize — The Board of Governors 
of West Virginia University each year offers a prize of $50 to the cadet in the 
Division of Military Science and Tactics "who shall write the best essay on 
preparation against war." 

Chi Omega Sorority Prize— The Chi Omega sorority offers an annual $15 
prize to the sociology major with the highest academic ranking. All work 
done at West Virginia University is taken into account and no student is 
eligible to compete for the prize unless his junior and senior years have been 
spent at West Virginia University. The prize is awarded at the annual June 
Commencement. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon Fraternity Prize — Phi Lambda Upsilon, honorary 
chemical fraternity, offers annually the Alexander Reed Whitehill award to 
the student receiving the highest grade in chemistry during the freshman 
year. The award consists of an engraved ornament. 

The R. A. West Prize for Engineering Students — R. A. West, an alumnus 
of the University, because of his interest in the College of Engineering and in 
the young men who have been and are students there and with the further 
idea of promoting sound scholarship, offers a prize of $50 to the member of 
the graduating class of the College of Engineering in June w T ho has main- 
tained the highest scholarship as measured by his honor-point average. 

Tau Beta Pi, honorary Engineering fraternity, each year offers an en- 
graved cup to the sophomore Engineer who during his freshman year main- 
tained the highest average in his class. 

The Nathan Burkan Memorial Prize — The American Society of Com- 
posers, Authors, and Publishers has established the Nathan Burkan Memorial 
Competition, open to the leading universities and colleges of the country that 
offer a course in law. A prize of $100 is available in each institution, to be 
awarded to the student in the graduating class in law who prepares the best 
paper on the subject of "Copyright Law." 

Prizes in Public Speaking — In each of the four events (debate, oration, 
extempore speaking, and poetry reading) in the West Virginia Interscholastic 
Public Speaking Contest a gold medal is awarded to the winner of first place; 
a silver medal to the winner of second place; and a bronze medal to all other 
speakers who participate in the semi-finals at the University. Each high 
school represented by a winner of first place is presented with a beautiful 
wall plaque with the escutcheon of the University mounted upon it. 

The Intercollegiate Peace Association of America provides $100 in cash 
prizes to be awarded as follows: $50 for first prize; $30 for second prize; and 
$20 for third prize in the annual Intercollegiate Peace Oratorical Contest. 
This contest is held under the auspices of the Department of Speech of the 
University and each institution of higher learning in the state is entitled to 
send one representative. 



80 General Information 



West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association prize for students in the 
School of Mines — In order to stimulate interest on the part of oil and natural 
gas engineering students in their profession, the West Virginia Oil and Nat- 
ural Gas Association offers a prize of $25 each year to a member of the grad- 
uating class of the School of Mines. The student must be enrolled in the oil 
and natural gas option, and his scholarship must be the highest of that group 
as measured by his honor-point average. 

West Virginia Coal Mining Institute prize for students in the School of 
Mines — In order to stimulate interest on the part of mining engineering 
students in their profession, the West Virginia Coal Mining Institute offers 
a prize of $25 each year to the members of the graduating class of the School 
of Mines. The student must be enrolled in the coal-mining option, and his 
scholarship must he the highest of that group as measured by his honor-point 
average. 

The Margaret Ann Cuthbert Music Prize — An annual prize of $25 in 
memory of his mother has been established by Frank Cuthbert, Director of the 
School of Music. It is awarded to the outstanding senior graduating from the 
School of Music and chosen by the faculty of that school for high scholastic 
standing and professional promise. 

The James Wimer Memorial Award — This award pays tuition for one 
year. The donor desires anonymity. The award is given to the senior making 
the highest average in his first three years in chemical engineering. 

Trophies 

Alpha Epsilon Delta Prize — The Alpha of West Virginia chapter of Alpha 
Epsilon Delta offers each year a silver cup to the freshman pre-medical student 
who has made the best scholastic record for the year in chemistry and zoology. 

The Inter-Fraternity Scholarship Trophy — Professor Arleigh Lee- Darby 
of the department of Romance languages and literature offers a silver cup 
known as the Inter-Fraternity Scholastic Trophy. It is awarded at the end of 
the University year to the fraternity having the highest average scholarship 
standing for that year and is to remain in the possession of that fraternity 
during the following year. The cup becomes the permanent property of the 
fraternity that first wins it five times. 

The George C. Eaker Trophy — The Hon. George C. Baker, graduate of 
the College of Law, offers a silver loving cup, possession of which is awarded 
each year to the Club Court in the College of Law winning the inter-club 
competition. 

The School of Physical Education and Athletics offers two trophies to the 
fraternities scoring the highest and second-highest number of points in the 
all-year athletic competition for fraternities. 

Pan-Hellenic Association Scholarship Cups — The Pan-Hellenic Association 
offers two scholarship cups. Any sorority which is a member of the Women's 
Pan-Hellenic Council may compete for the cup, and it is awarded each year to 
the group having the highest average. The woman's fraternity which has 
maintained the highest average for three consecutive years is given permanent 
possession of the cup. The Pan-Hellenic Association also offers a cup each 
year to the pledge group which maintains the highest average. 



loxoi; Societies 81 



Medals 

The Lehn and Fink Medal — Through the generosity of Lehn and Fink, 
manufacturing chemists of New York City, the College of Pharmacy awards 
each year to the senior pharmacy student who, in the opinion of the Faculty 
of the College of Pharmacy, attains the highest scholarship a gold medal. 
The medal is appropriately engraved. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Phi Beta Kappa — The Alpha of West Virginia chapter of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society is established at the University. Stated meetings or public 
exercises of the society are held twice annually; the anniversary meeting on 
December •">. and the annual meeting during Commencement Week. The honor 
of membership may be conferred upon candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts who have maintained a high scholarship rank during their college 
course; also, upon members of the faculty and alumni of the University, and 
upon distinguished citizens of the state. 

Sigma Xi — The Society of the Sigma Xi is a national honorary society 
devoted to the advancement of research in pure and applied science. Member- 
ship may be conferred upon faculty members and students who show out- 
standing ability in some field of scientific research. 

Tau Beta Pi — The West Virginia Alpha chapter of the national engineer- 
ing honor association of Tau Beta Pi was established in the College of Engi- 
neering in 1922. Students who rank in scholarship among the upper one- 
eighth of their class are eligible to election in their third year and all who 
rank among the upper one-fourth of the class are likewise eligible in their 
fourth year. These together with alumni and honorary members constitute 
the chapter. 

Alpha Zeta — The West Virginia chapter of Alpha Zeta, the national agri- 
cultural honor fraternity, was instituted in the College of Agriculture in 
1921. Sophomores and upperclassmen who maintain high standing in schol- 
arship and rank among the upper two-fifths of their respective classes are 
eligible to membership. 

Phi Upsilon Omicron — The Lambda chapter of Phi Upsilon Omicron, one 
of the national professional organizations in home economics, was established 
at the University in November, 1923. Its purpose is to promote the moral and 
intellectual development of its members, to help develop leadership, and to 
advance home economics. Membership is open to juniors and seniors in home 
economics who rank in the upper two-fifths of the class in scholarship and 
who meet certain personality standards. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon — The Tau chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon, national 
chemical honor fraternity, was established at the University in 1924. The 
chief object of the society is the promotion and protection of high scholarship 
and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemistry. 
Seniors and juniors who have attained a high standard of scholarship and 
character are eligible for membership. 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon — Upsilon chapter was established at West Virginia 
University in 1927. The fraternity has for its objects the social, scholastic 



( i E X BRAL 1 X FOR M ATION 



and scientific advancement of its members, the extension of the relations of 
friendship and assistance between the universities and scientific schools with 
recognized standing in the United States and Canada, and the upbuilding of 
a national college society devoted to the advancement of g^eo-logy, mining, 
metallurgy, and ceramics. Seniors and juniors in the courses indicated, who 
have attained high scholarship rank, are eligible for membership. 

Order of the Coif — A chapter of the Order of the Coif, a national law 
school honor society, was installed in 1925. Its members are selected by the 
Law faculty from the 10 percent of the senior class in the College of Law 
ranking highest in scholarship. 

Phi Epsilon Phi — Phi Epsilon Phi, botanical honor fraternity, was founded 
at West Virginia University in 1929. The fraternity has for its purpose the 
promotion of high scholarship, the inciting of interest in botanical research, 
and the encouragement of professional ideals. Seniors and graduate students 
who are engaged in botanical work and who have attained a high standard of 
scholarship and character are eligible for membership in the organization. 

Kappa Tau Alpha — National journalistic honor society with special em- 
phasis on high scholarship and the best professional ideals. There are chap- 
ters in 22 universities. The West Virginia chapter was established in 1930. 

Sigma Pi Sigma — Theta chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, national physics 
honor society, was installed in the University in 1929. The formal statement 
of the objects of the society is: "To reward high scholarship and promote 
interest in the advanced study of physics, to stimulate individual research, 
and to enable its members to keep pace with the progress of science." A 
student elected to membership must be taking some course in physics at the 
time of his election. Graduate students who are taking advanced work in 
physics and related subjects are eligible for membership. 

Kappa Delta Pi — Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary educational society, 
installed Alpha Upsilon chapter at West Virginia University, July 21, 1927. 
Election to this fraternity is conditional upon high scholarship and desirable 
personal and professional qualities. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta — The Alpha of West Virginia chapter of Alpha Ep- 
silon Delta was established at West Virginia University in 1930. The chief 
object of the society is the promotion of high scholarship among pre-medical 
students. Juniors and seniors of high scholarship and character are eligible 
for membership. 

Pi Tau Sigma — The West Virginia Pi Gamma chapter of Pi Tau Sigma 
was installed at West Virginia University on March 31, 1942. This is ' an 
honorary mechanical engineering fraternity with chapters in 35 universities. 
Seniors and juniors in mechanical engineering who have attained high schol- 
arship rank are eligible for membership. 

Eta Kappa Nu — Eta Kappa Nu, an electrical engineering honorary society 
installed at West Virginia University in 1946, is open to students in the upper 
fourth of the junior class and in the upper third of the senior class. 

Scabbard and Blade — C Company, Second Regiment, West Virginia Uni- 
versity, the National Society of Scabbard and Blade, was installed on May 21, 
1916. The society believes that military service is an obligation of citizenship 
and that the greater opportunities afforded college men for the study of military 



Other University Organizations 



S3 



science place upon them certain responsibilities as citizens. The purpose is to 
create and unite in closer relationship the military departments of American 
universities and colleges; to preserve and develop the essential qualities of good, 
efficient officers; to prepare themselves as educated men to take a more 
active part and to have a greater influence in the military affairs of the com- 
munities in which they may reside; and above all to spread intelligent in- 
formation concerning the military requirements of our country. The society, 
inactive during the war, was reactivated on the Univesity campus during the 
school year 1946-47. Advanced Course ROTC students who maintain high stand- 
ing in scholarship, leadership, character, and efficiency are eligible for mem- 
bership. 

OTHER UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

There are in the University various fraternities, sororities, societies, and 
clubs devoted chiefly to the social, educational, and athletic interests of the 
students. Some of the more important of these organizations are: 

National and Greek Letter Societies 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES 

Men 



tie la Theta Pi 
Delta Tau Delta 
Kappa Alpha 
Kappa Sigma 
Phi Delta Theta 
Phi Kappa Psi 
Phi Kappa Tau 
Phi Sigma Delta 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Alpha Phi 
Alpha Xi Delta 
Chi Omega 
Delta Gamma 



Phi Sigma Kappa 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Pi Lambda Phi 

Sigma Chi 

Sigma Nu 

Sigma Phi Epsiloti 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Council of Fraternity Presidents 



Women 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Pi Beta Phi 
Sigma Delta Tau 
Pan-Hellenic Association 



PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES 

Men and Women 



Alpha Kappa Psi (Economics) 
Alpha Psi Omega (Dramatic) 
Delta' Phi Alpha (German) 
Delta Sigma Rho (Forensic) 
Eta Sigma Phi (Latin) 



Phi Delia Phi (Law) 
Phi Alpha Delta (Law) 
Phi Beta Pi (Medical) 
Phi Chi (Medical) 



National and Local Organizations 



Agricultural Club 

Associated Women Students 

Ahtletie Managers Club 

Cadet Hop Association 

Camera Club 

Christian Youth Council 

Circolo Italiano (Italian) 

Dames Club 

Der deutsche Verein (German) 

Dolphin Club (Physical Education) 

English Club 

F. F. A. Club (Collegiate) 

Forestry Club 



Public Affairs Club 

Rhododendron (Junior women) 

Rowan Rifles (Military) 

Scabbard and Blade (Military) 

Sociology and Social Work Club 

Speech Club 

Sphinx (Senior men) 

"Spiked Shoe" (Track and field) 

Student Forum 

University Band 

University 4-H Club 

[Jniversity and Community Chorus 

University and Community Orchestra 



84 General Information 



Forum University Scientific Society 

Future Teachers of America Veterans' Association of World War II 

Home Economics Clnb Woman's Hall 

International Relations Clnb North Wing 

Journaliers (Men, Journalist) South Wing 

Ha Tertulia (Spanish) Women's Recreation Association 

L,e Foyer Francais (French) Women's Glee Clnb 

Li-Toon-Awa (Sophomore women) Women's Pan-Hellenic Association 

McDowell Club (Intersorority) 

Matrix (Women, Journalistic) Student branches of the following 1 : 

Men's Glee Club Araer. Inst, of Chemical Engineers 

Mortar Board (Senior Women) Amer. Society of Civil Engineers 

Mountain (Men) Amer. Inst, of Electrics! Engineers 

Outing Club Amer. Society of Mechanical 

Orchesis (Women, Physical Education) Engineers 

Philological Society Amer. Inst, of Mining and 

Physical Education Club Metallurgical Engineers 

Pre-Tjaw Fraternity Society of American Military 

Press Club (Journalism majors) Engineers 

University Religious Council Xi Gamma Iota (ex-G. I. women) 

Faculty Organizations 

American Association of University Professors — The West Virginia Uni- 
versity chapter of the American Association of University Professors now 
has a membership of approximately 50. The present officers are: F. P. Sum- 
mers, president; A. S. Abel, vice-president; Ruth D. Noer, secretary-treasurer. 

Faculty Club — The Faculty Club of the University, organized on March 10, 
1921, is composed of the teaching, research, and extension staffs of the insti- 
tution. Tbe club rents a house at the corner of Pleasants and Spruce Streets 
which serves as a club house and residence. Meals are served to members 
and their guests. The clubrooms provide a center for social activities of 
members of the Faculty. 

Campus Club — The Campus Club is a social organization made up of women 
on the University staff as well as the wives of men on the staff. The club 
holds meetings twice each month and special meetings and functions at other 
times. 

Cornell Club of Morgantown — The Cornell Club of Morgantown is an 
alumni social organization founded in 1925. Membership is open to gradu- 
ates and former students of Cornell University who live in this region and 
to their husbands and wives. The club holds an annual meeting and dinner 
and other occasional meetings at which speakers from Cornell are heard. 
The officers are: president, F. D. Cornell, Jr.; vice-president, J. H. C. Martens; 
secretary, W. H. Childs; treasurer, D. W. Parsons. 

West Virginia Alumni Association of Johns Hopkins — The West Virginia 
Alumni Association of Johns Hopkins, founded in 1913, holds annual meetings 
on February 22, the anniversary of the establishment of Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Graduates and former students of Johns Hopkins are eligible for 
membership. Elizabeth M. Stalnaker is president; Dr. Dorsey Brannan, vice- 
president; and O. D. Lambert, secretary. 

Wisconsin Alumni Club — Graduates and former students of the University 
of Wisconsin are eligible to membership in this organization, which holds 
social meetings at which speakers from that university are heard. Edw. H. 
Tyner is the present president of the club, organized in 1937. 



Publications 



PUBLICATIONS 
University Publications 

The following publications are issued regularly at the University: 

1. The West Virginia University Bulletin, issued monthly during the year. 
The series includes the Catalogue of the University and the Announcements of 
the various colleges and schools as well as other occasional publications. 

2. The bulletins and circulars of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

3. The circulars of the Agricultural Extension Division, including the 
Farm Women's Club leaflets, the 4-H Suggestions, the Treasures of v.he Trail, 
the West Virginia Farm News (in cooperation with the West Virginia Farm 
Bureau), and special pamphlets. 

4. Agricultural News Service bulletins published weekly by the College of 
Agriculture. 

5. The bulletins of the Engineering Experiment Station and of the School 
of Mines. 

6. The West Virginia Law Quarterly, the official publication of the West 
Virginia Bar Association, edited by the faculty of the College of Law. 

7. Miscellaneous publications under the title of Philological Studies or Bio- 
logical Studies. 

8. The Student Directory, the annual directory of the student body, pub- 
lished by the University Book Store. 

9. The annual Proceedings of the West Virginia Academy of Science. 

10. The West Virginia Fourth Estatesman, a quarterly publication edited 
by the faculty of the School of Journalism. 

Student- Publications 

The Daily Athenaeum, University student newspaper, is published daily 
Tuesday through Saturday, by students of the School of Journalism. Heads of 
the editorial and business staffs are elected by the student body from candi- 
dates certified by the School of Journalism faculty and approved by the Com- 
mittee on Student Bublications. 

The IVIonticola, student yearbook of the University, is usually published 
by upperclassmen. The editorial and managerial staff is elected by the student 
body. 

The Moonshine, student humorous magazine, is published by a staff chosen 
from the student body. 

The Freshman Handbook is published annually by a selected group of 
students and is distributed to each member of the entering class. It is wholly 
a nonprofit enterprise. 

The Cruiser, a student forestry yearbook, is published by the West Vir- 
ginia University Forestry Club. The managing editor is appointed by the 
executive board of the club. 

All student publications are under the supervision of the committee on 
Student Bublications. 



86 General Information 



ASSOCIATED INSTITUTIONS 
The West Virginia Academy of Science 

Organized in 1924 to bring about closer affiliation among the scientists of 
the state and to encourage the pursuit of scientific work throughout the com- 
monwealth, the West Virginia Academy of Science is a body of nearly 300 
men and women who are interested in the service of science in the develop- 
ment of the state. The members are widely distributed throughout the state 
and are representative of colleges, high schools, and industries. Annual meet- 
ings, held at the various institutions of higher learning, are divided into sec- 
tions on biology, chemistry, geology and mining, mathematics and physics, 
and social sciences. The Proceedings of the annual meetings are published 
under the auspices of the University and of the Academy. 

The West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey 

The West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, situated at West 
Virginia University, is governed by its own commission and receives separate 
appropriations. 

The Geological Survey was founded by an Act of the Legislature in 1S97 
and has functioned consistently since that date. It is recognized as one of the 
leading state surveys. 

One of the major purposes of the Survey is to have members of its staff, 
specialists in their field, investigate all the natural resources, and especially 
the mineral resources, of the state and to make the results of the investiga- 
tions available to the public in the form of written reports and maps. 

Acomplishments of the Survey include the complete topographic map- 
ping of the state on 1-mile-to-the-inch quadrangles; the complete geologic 
mapping of the state by counties, and a state geologic map; the complete map- 
ping of the soils of the state by counties; and the state relief map (scale 1 
inch equals 4 miles). 

Numerous special reports also have been made on coal, oil, gas, clays, 
limestones and cement, iron ores and building stone, mineral springs, manga- 
nese, deep-well records, salt brines, rock salt, and forest and wood industries. 

The professional staff of the Survey is composed of six geologists, three 
chemists, and a spectroscopist. Some of the staff members of the Survey 
serve as part-time teachers in the department of geology of the University, and 
there is close cooperation between the department and the Survey. Several 
members of the staff who served in the Army and Navy on leave of absence 
have now returned to their former positions. 

Government of the Survey is vested in the Geological Survey Commis- 
sion, composed of the Governor of West Virginia, the State Treasurer, the 
Commissioner of Agriculture, the President of 'West Virginia University, and 
the Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The West Virginia Biological Survey 

The West Virginia Biological Survey is an organization of voluntary 
workers whose purpose is the collection of information of every kind about 
the plants and animals of the state. 



Associated Institutions 87 



The executive committee consists of a biologist from each of the colleges 
of the state with a chairman, secretary, and curator. There are no dues, and 
membership is open to all persons interested in the work of the Survey. 

The repository for the plant and animal collections is in Science Hall, 
West Virginia University, Morgantown, and Marshall College, Huntington. 
Under the direction of the Survey a series of bibliographies dealing with the 
biology of the state is being* published. 

The Survey, in cooperation with the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, during several summers has maintained one or more field collectors 
whose work has taken them into all parts of West Virginia. An increase in 
knowledge of biological conditions in the state has resulted from this work. 

The State Road Commission 

The Materials Laboratory of the State Road Commission is housed in 
Mechanical Hall of the 'University. Its work includes the testing of all ma- 
terials used by the Commission and also research on problems of road 
construction and maintenance in West Virginia. 



Part III 

Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

in the Colleges, School, and Divisions 



ABBREVIATIONS FOR PART II! 

The following abbreviations are used in. the announcements of courses: 

I — A course given in the first semester. 

II — A i course given in the second semester. 

I, II — A semester course given in each semester. 

I and II — A course given throughout the year. 

s — A course offered only in the Summer Session. 

Hrs. — Number of credit hours per course. 

PR — prerequisite. 

t— Course omitted, 1947-48. 

THE PLAN FOR NUMBERING COURSES 

For convenience each course of study is designated by the name of the 
department in which it is given and by the number of that course. The plan of 
numbering is as follows: 

Courses 1 to 99 — courses intended primarily for freshmen and sopho- 
mores. 
Courses 100 to 199 — courses intended 'primarily for juniors and seniors. 
Courses 200 to 299 — advanced courses open to juniors, seniors, and gradu- 
ate students. 
Courses 300 to 399 — courses open to graduate students only. 

SCHEDULES 

Before the opening of each semester, a schedule is printed announcing the 
courses to be offered in that semester in the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Education, the School of Music, the School of Physical Education 
and Athletics, the School of Journalism, and the Division of Home Economics 
in the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. Schedules are 
prepared for the College of Agriculture, the College of Engineering, the Col- 
lege of Law, the College of Pharmacy, and the . School of Medicine but are 
not printed. A complete schedule of all courses offered in the Summer Ses- 
sion is printed in the Summer Session Bulletin. 

[88] 



The College op Agriculture 89 



The College of Agriculture, Forestry, 
and Home Economics 

ORGANIZATION 

All the agricultural, forestry, and home economics work of the University- 
is organized under the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. 
For the purpose of administration the College is divided into three branches: 
viz., 

I. The Agricultural Experiment Station, organized for research and ex- 
perimental work. 

II. Resident instruction in agriculture, in forestry, and in home economics. 

III. Extension work in agriculture, forestry, home economics, and boys' 
and girls' club work, given by the Division of Agricultural Extension 
to citizens of the state who are not in residence at the College. 

The work of these divisions is closely interrelated. Although some mem- 
bers of the staff devote full time to college instruction, research, or extension 
work, many others divide their time among two or three of these divisions. 

The Standing Committees 

STUDENTS' COURSES AND HOURS: Messrs. Ortox, Peairs, Parsons, Per- 
cival ; Miss Noer. 

SCHOLARSHIP: Messrs. Pohlmax, Percival; Miss Dietrich. 
STUDENT PLACEMENT AND FARM PRACTICE: Messrs. Livesay, Parsons, 
Marsh, Pohlmax, Sudds, Hexdersox. 

LIBRARY:' Messrs. Dustman, Cartledge, Sudds, Armextrout, Ericksox, 
Leach; Miss Palmer. 

STATION STAFF COMMITTEES 

STATION PROJECTS: Messrs. Clark. Colmer, Armextrout. 
STATION PUBLICATIONS: Messrs. Wilsox, Taylor, Peairs. 
STAFF CONFERENCES: Messrs. Hyre, Hyatt, Tryox. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Agricultural Experiment Station was established in the University 
by the Board of Regents in 1888 by authority of an act of Congress known as 
the Hatch Act. Further support was given by acts of Congress known as the 
Adams Act, approved June 30, 1906, the Purnell Act, approved February 24, 
1925, the Bankhead- Jones Act, approved June 29, 1935, and the Flannagan-Hope 
Act, approved August 14, 1946. The work of the Station is supported also by 
state appropriations. 



^Joint Committee of the College and Experiment Station. 



90 CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF I X 



STRUCTION 



Investigations are being conducted in the fields of animal husbandry, 
animal pathology, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, field crops, horticul- 
ture, entomology, plant pathology, agricultural biochemistry, soils, land use, 
water problems, farm economics, farm mechanics, forestry, physiology, nutri- 
tion, hillculture, bacteriology, and mycology, classified into about 100 research 
projects. 

fn addition to the five farms situated at Morgantown, described else- 
where in this Catalogue, 1 branches of the Agricultural Experiment Station are 
maintained at Wardensville, Hardy County; Lakin, Mason County; Kearneys- 
ville, Jefferson County; and Reedsville, Preston County. Experimental work 
is also being carried on elsewhere throughout the state. 

Agricultural Extension 

Ry act of the Legislature of 1913, amended in 1915, "in order to promote 
the improvement and advancement of agriculture, domestic science, and rural 
life among the people of the several counties of the state," there was "created 
and established in the College of Agriculture an Agricultural Extension Divi- 
sion to be coordinate with the resident instruction division and the Agricultural 
Experiment Station" of the College. This service is financed and administered 
with the cooperation of federal, state, and county governments. 

The work originally undertaken has been expanded to include the 4-H 
Club Camp for boys and girls, established at Jackson's Mill in 1921 for the 
purpose of teaching standards of excellence in agriculture and home economics, 
and the recreation center, established at Oglebay Park (Wheeling) in 1926, 
which has undertaken the task of developing adequate programs for improving 
the use of leisure time of both rural and urban citizens and for the training of 
community leaders. 

Short Courses and Special Schools 

In addition to the instruction of collegiate grade offered, the College of 
Agriculture maintains a series of annual short courses and special schools for 
the benefit of adult residents in the state who wish to obtain, in brief periods, 
education in certain fields. This series includes the Dairy and Ice Cream Short 
Course, the Horticulture Extension School, Farm and Home Week; Junior 
Farmer's Week, and the Junior Homemakers' Conference. 

THE DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 

The training offered in agriculture is directed to fit the student for farm 
life or professional and business fields. Graduates may engage in farming 
as managers or as farm owners, in the teaching of agriculture in high schools 
or colleges, in extension work as county agents or specialists, in research 
work in experiment stations or other organizations, or in many of the 
federal activities in aid of agriculture. They may engage in business related 
to farming, such as dairy manufacturers, meat processing, seeds and nursery 
stock, feeds and fertilizers, or marketing 



'See page 35. 



The College of Agrici lture 91 



The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 
is designed to provide a broad and well-grounded training in the general 
field of agriculture so that the graduate may be prepared foi occupations 
requiring such general knowledge, and may have the necessary foundation 
for such specialization as he may elect to pursue. 

All candidates for the degree will follow a uniform curriculum for the 
first two years, which includes courses in the sciences that are fundamental 
to agriculture, together with certain specified courses in agriculture. During 
the third and fourth years a certain amount of selection is permitted which 
will enable the student to meet special requirements in various fields, such as 
animal industry, plant industry, dairy manufacturers, and agricultural educa- 
tion. In the last-mentioned field he may qualify for the teacher's certificate 
in Vocational Agriculture. Or the student may make the elective work broader 
in its scope and prepare for some phase of extension activity or for general 
farming; or he may choose the Agricultural Science curriculum, which will 
serve as a foundation for later graduate work in some scientific phase of 
agriculture. 

For the use of the students the following laboratories are maintained in 
the college: agricultural chemistry, agronomy, soils, genetics, animal hus- 
bandry, animal pathology, dairy husbandry, entomology, farm economics, farm 
shop work, horticulture, nutrition, plant pathology, and poultry husbandry. 

The Curriculum in Agricultural Science 

Students who expect to do graduate work in preparation for teaching 
agricultural science in colleges and universities or for research work in ex- 
periment stations, or for other work in specialized fields of basic agicultural 
science, should register for the Curriculum in Agricultural Science. Only 
those students who have a high-school record above the average and who are 
capable of maintaining a scholarship average of B or above should follow 
this curriculum. Success in graduate work will depend upon better-than-average 
undergraduate scholarship, and such undergraduate work must include ade- 
quate preparation in biology, mathematics, English, and foreign languages. 
The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon the satisfactory com- 
pletion of this curriculum. 

The Combined Degree: A. B., end B. S. in Agriculture 

Students who desire a broader training than that furnished in the cur- 
riculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture are re- 
minded that, by proper arrangement of their courses, they may obtain both 
degees in five years. Such students normally will take first the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in the College of Arts and Sciences, usually with major work 
in the field of biology. For particulars, see the Announcements of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 



92 CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The Two-year Curriculum Leading to the Certificate in Agriculture 

Students who may wish to acquire technical training in the field of scien- 
tific agriculture, but who do not care to meet all the requirements for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, may register for the two-year 
curriculum leading to the Certificate in Agriculture. Requirements fc>r 
entrance are the same as for the four-year course, namely, a high-school 
diploma. The first year's work is designed to give the student basic studies 
in some of the principal fields of Agriculture. The second year's work is more 
flexible, allowing the student to specialize in some field of Agriculture if he 
so desires. 

Seventy hours of work are required, this work to include 6 hours of 
English, 2 hours of physical education, and 6 hours of military science (if not 
exempted). At least 45 hours of credit must be taken in the College of Agri- 
culture. Students in this curricculum can complete this course without regard 
to honor points; however, no credit can be transferred to the four-year course 
unless the grade in each course is C or above. 

Graduate Work 

Graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree is offered in all 
branches of agriculture and in home economics education. In certain branches 
also, courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are offered. The 
student who plans to pursue graduate work is directed to the Graduate 
School announcements in the University Catalogue. Advancement in any 
of the professional fields is dependent on graduate study, and the student 
desiring to pursue such work should plan to continue in graduate study 
immediately upon the completion of the undergraduate curriculum if possible. 
A limited number of graduate assistantships which permit half-time devotion 
to study are available in the Division of Agriculture and in the Experiment 
Station. 

Teachers of vocational agriculture may combine graduate course in Agri- 
culture and Education by taking 16 to 20 hours in Agriculture and 10 to 14 
hours in Education to fulfill the requirements for the M. S. degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 
Credits Required 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture may be conferred upon 
any student who satisfies the entrance requirements and offers 144 hours' 
approved credit for college courses, including all requirements set forth below. 

The "semester hour" is the standard for computing the amount of work 
required for graduation. The •'hour" represents the amount of work done 
in one semester (18 weeks) in one recitation with two preparation hours a 
week, or three hours' practice or laboratory work requiring no outside 
preparation. 

No student is permitted to register for less than 14 hours or more than 
20 hours of work in any one semester without special permission. 



The College of Agriculture 93 

Required and Elective Subjects 

All the couses for the first two years, and most of the courses for the 
third year, are definitely required for all students (except majors in voca- 
tional agriculture and in dairy manufactures). These courses are shown in 
the Basic Curriculum. Students who are not required to take military science 
must substitute elective credits. Agriculture 5, required of students deficient 
in farm practice, must be completed before the third year. First-year English 
(English 1 and 2 or their equivalent) must be completed before any upper- 
division courses may be pursued for credit towards the degree. 

The fourth-year college student who wishes a general education in the 
field of Agriculture, leading toward the Bachelor's degree, is directed to the 
General Curriculum Agriculture. This course is broad enough to prepare 
the student to serve as a county agent or in related extension work. 

For those who desire more specialized training, five courses are open — 
animal industry, plant industry, dairy manufactures, vocational agriculture, 
and conservation. The vocational-agriculture course is the only curriculum 
which qualifies a student to obtain a teacher's certificate. 

After requirements have been met, electives may be chosen, without 
restriction as to college or department, with the approval of the adviser or of 
the Committee on Courses and Hours. However, the required and elective 
hours taken in the College of Agriculture must amount to at least 60 hours. 
Provision is made for upper-division students who miay wish to elect certain 
lower-division subjects such as languages. 

Students who expect to pursue graduate work in Agriculture are advised 
to matriculate in the Agricultural Science curriculum for their undergraduate 
courses. This curriculum requires that a minimum of 45 hours be taken in 
the College of Agriculture in at least five subject-matter divisions. 

The Dean of the College of Agriculture will act as adviser for all agri- 
culture students and will assign students to other advisers whom he may 
designate. 

Electives 

Elective work to make up the total required for graduation may be chosen 
from courses in the College of Agriculture or in other colleges of the Univ- 
ersity with the consent of the adviser or of the Committee on Courses and 
Hours. Ordinarily, little restriction is placed on the choice of such electives. 

Students who offer credit from other institutions shall have their offerings 
evaluated by the Committee on Courses and Hours, which shall have discre- 
tionary powers in the acceptance or refusal of credit to count toward gradu- 
ation from the College of Agriculture. 



94 



Curriculab Requirements and Courses of [nstruction 



THE BASIC CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem, Tf 


rs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Son. ' 


Ers. 


English 1 3 


English 2 


3 


Chemistry 


312 4 


D'y. Husb. 


12 3 


Chemistry 1 4 


Chemistry 2 


4 


Pact. 41 " 


4 


Horticulture 


1 4 


Biology 1 4 


Botany 5 


4 


Agronomy 


1 4 


Agronomy 2 


3 


Agriculture 1 2 


Agr. Eng'g 2 


o 


Mil. Sci. 3 


2 


Zoology 3 


4 


Phys. educ 1 


Poultry 1 


4 


Geology 1 


3 


Mil. Sci. 4 


2 


Mil. Sci. 1 1 


Phys. educ.i 
Mil. Sci. 2 


1 
1 


An. Husib. 


11 3 


Elective 


2 


*15 




19 




20 




18 


THIRD 


YEAR 






FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


Hort. 102 4 


Agr. Econ. 102 


3 


PI. Path. 


103 3 


Agr. 271 


2 


An. Husb. 101 3 


Physics 2 & 4 


4 


Electives 


16 


Electives 


16 


Economics 1 


Electives 


4 










(or) 


An. Path. 102 


3 










Ag. Econ. 101 3 


Entomol. 102 


4 










Physics 1 & 3 4 














D'y. Husb. Ill 3- 














17 




18 




19 




18 



'Only 2 hours in the service program accepted toward graduation. 

2 Chemistry 136 (6 hrs.) or 233 (5 hrs.) may be substituted. 

3 In addition to the courses listed above, 2 hours in farm practice must be 
earned by students with insufficient farm experience. This requirement must be 
met before the beginning- of the junior year (See Agriculture 5). 

*Freshmen who give evidence of high scholastic ability may be allowed to 
take an additional course. 



NOTE 

Before registering for his junior year, the student should decide upon the 
field of his major interest and must consult with the head of the department 
concerned with respect to choice and sequence of electives. 

The following specialized courses of study are designed to meet the needs 
of students interested in certain phases of the profession: 

In the general field of AGRICULTURE, required courses include Agricul- 
tural Economics 104 (3 hrs.) and Forestry ISO (2 hrs.). 

In the fields of ANIMAL, DAIRY, and POULTRY HUSBANDRY, re- 
quired courses include Animal Husbandry 203 (3 hrs.) and Genetics 111 or 
221 (2 or 3 hrs.). 

In the fields of AGRONOMY and HORTICULTURE, required courses in- 
clude Genetics 221, Agronomy 210, and Agricultural Economics 104 (3 hrs. 
each), Botany 221 (4 hrs.), and Forestry 180 (2 hrs.). Required also for 
Agronomy students are Mathematics 3 (4 hrs.), Mathematics 4 (2 hrs.), and 
Agronomy 200 (3 hrs.). Required also for Horticulture students are Horti- 
culture 206, 212 or 232, 213, and 209 or 233 (3 hrs. each). 



The College of Agriculture 



THE CURRICULUM FOR STUDENTS OF DAIRY MANUFACTURES 

(following the Basic Curriculum) 

The curriculum given below is suggestive as regards subjects and may be 
varied by the class adviser to meet the needs of individual students, but the 
curriculum indicates the subjects which are usually advised for students who 
desire to take major work in dairy manufacturing. 

THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. 
D'y Husb. 
D'y Husb. 
D'y Husb. 
D'y Husb 
Agr. Econ. 
Physics 1 



Hrs. 

Ill 3 

218* 3 

107 3 

103f 3 

101 3 

& 3 4 



19 



Second Son. Hrs. 



First Sem. 



Ilrs. 



Agr. Econ. 102 3 D'y Husb. 



Physics 2 & 4 4 
D'y Husb. 102* 3 

(or) 
D'y Husb. 104t 3 
Agr. Econ. 160* 2 

(or) 
D'y Husb. 246* 3 
Electives 5 or 6 



Agr. Econ 
Hort. 102 
Agr. Econ 
Electives 



218* 
235 

131 



Hrs. 
104f 3 



Second Sem 
D'y Husb. 

(or) 
D'y Husb. 102* 
D'y Has. 204 
D'y Husb. 222 
D'y Husb. 246* 

(or) 
Agr. Econ. 160* 
Electives 4 or 



IS 



18 18 

THE CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL 
AGRICULTURE 4 

The State Board of Education has set up definite requirements applicable 
to all college graduates desiring to teach in West Virginia high schools. These 
requirements specify the kind and number of various sciences and agricultural 
courses as well as courses in professional education subjects, all of which are 
necessary to qualify graduates for certification. The following curriculum, 
which embodies such courses required for certification, is designed to prepare 
the qualifying student for a teaching career in the specialized field of voca- 
tional agriculture, with provision for teaching biology as a second subject. 
It also satisfies the requirements for the B. S. Agr. degree. 

To meet state requirements for teaching vocational agriculture a total of 
50 hours in Agriculture is required as provided in the following curriculum. 

The complete statement of the requirements for certification to teach sub- 
jects related to agriculture will be found in the announcements of the College 
of Education. 

THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem.. Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


An. Husb. 


101 


3 


Agr. Econ. 102 3 


Plant or animal 


Educ. 


2 


Hort. 102 




4 


Agr. Eng'g 153 3 


pathology 3 


Educ. 214 


2 


Econ. 1 






English 3 


Social science 3 


Educ. 120 


2 


(or) 






Hist., political 


Education 160 3 


Educ. 224 


4 


Agr. Econ. 


101 


3 


sci., or geog. 3 


Agr. Econ. 104 3 


Speech 11 


3 


Agr. Eng'g 


152 


3 


Educ. 109 2 


Phys. Ed. 180 2* 


Agr. 271 


2 


Educ. 106 




3 


Entomology 102 4 


Electives 2 


Rural Org. 


118 2 


Dairy 111 




3 




Educ. 2 










18 


18 


18 




17 



iOffered in alternate years. 

♦Offered in alternate years; not available in 1947-48. 

4 For a list of subjects required to teach n on -vocational agriculture, see the 
bulletin. Requirements A pplieable to Degrees and to Teacher Certification. 



96 



Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



THE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS 

This curriculum is intended for teachers of vocational agriculture who 
choose agricultural mechanics as a teaching field. If the fifth year is taken, 
the student can obtain his Master's degree in some agricultural field. Other- 
wise, eight hours must be taken in the summer to complete the teaching re- 
quirements. This curriculum fulfills the requirements to teach industrial arts or 
general shop in the high school. 



THIRD 


YEAR 


FOURTI 


H YEAR 




First Sent. Ers. 


Second Sem. Ers. 


First Sem. Ers. 


Second Sem. 


Ers. 


Hort. 102 


4 


Agr. Econ. 102 3 


Plant or ani- 


Math. 10 


3 


An. Husb. 101 


3 


Mech. Eng'g 


mal pathology 3 


Educ. 160 


3 


Agr. Econ. 101 


3 


20 3 


Agr. Econ. 104 3 


Education 120 2 


Education 106 


3 


Speech 11 3 


Social Science 3 


Educ. 214 


2 


English 


3 


Math. 2 3 


Agr. Eng'g 170 3 


Educ. 224 


4 


Health Ed. 180 


2 


Education 109 2 


Educ 2 


Mech. Eng'g 








Agri. Eng'g 153 3 


Mech. Eng'g 


12 


1 






Social Science 3 


24 2 


Mech. Eng'g 










Mech. Eng'g 


15 


2 








11 2 


Agriculture 
271 


1 




18 


20 
FIFTH 


18 
YEAR 




18 


First Semester 




Ers. 


Second Semester 




Ers. 


Agricultural Engineering 252 3 


Agricultural Engineering 253 


3 


Electives 




12 


Education 294 
Electives 




2 
10 



15 



15 



THE CURRICULUM IN CONSERVATJON 



Fl 


RST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Ers. 


Second Sem. E 


rs. 


First Sem. 


Ers. 


Second Sen:. Ers. 


Biology 1 


4 


Agr. Eng'g 1 


o 


Agronomy 1 


4 


Botany 30 4 


Chemistry 1 


4 


Botany 5 


4 


Chemistry 31 


4 


Entomology 2 4 


English 1 


3 


Chemistry 2 


4 


Civil Eng'g 5 


4 


Physics 2 & 4 •! 


Mathematics: 2 


9 


English 2 


3 


Physics 1 & :'. 


4 


Zoology ."» t 


Mil. Sci. 1 


1 


Mathematics 10 


o 


Mil. Sci. 3 


2 


Mil. Sci. 1 2 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Mil. Sci. 2 


1 








Agriculture 1 


"- 


Phys. Ed. 2 
Conservation 2 


1 











16 19 18 IS 

Summer Session Following Sophomore Year 

Conservation 101s (Conservation of Renewable Resources) 2 Hrs. 

To be given at State 4-H Camp, Jackson's Mill, during the first 

two weeks of the second summer term. 
Agricultural Engineering 151s (Mechanics of Soil and Water 

Conservation) 4 Hrs 

To be given on Campus after Conservation 101s. 



The College of Agriculture 



97 





THIRD YEAR 






FOURTH 


YEAR 




First Si m. 


J Irs. 


s< cond Sent. 


11 


rs. 


First St in. 


Hrs. 


St c<> nd Sem. 


TTrx. 


Agr. Bcon. 101 3 


Agron. 102 




3 


Agr. Econ. 104 


o 


Agron. 220 


2 


Botany 131 


4 


An. Husb. 104 




4 


Agron. 205 


2 


Climatology 


o 


Geol. 1 & 2 


4 


Conserv. 150 






Agrn. 215 


j 


Forestry 182 


2 


Hort. 103 


3 


Forestry 180 




2 


An. Husb. 101 


a 


Forestry 183 


j» 


PI. Path. 103 


3 


Forestry 1S1 
Elective 




2 

9 


Botany 121 
Elective 


2 


Elective 


8 



17 



17 



18 



Summer Employment in Conservation 

Agency 
Recommended Electives: Agronomy 200, 210; Bacteriology 141, 314 

220, 221; Animal Husbandry 222; Agricultural Economics 102, 

tomology 103. 



18 



Genetics 
131; En- 



THE BASIC CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 



FIRST YEAR 



SECOND' YEAR 



First Sem. 


Hrs 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


o 
o 


Organic Chem. 4 


Quantitative 


Chemistry 


1 4 


Chemistry 2 


Bact. 41 4 


Chem. 3 


Biology 1 


4 


Botany 5 


4 


Agr. Econ. 101 3 


Zoology 3 4 


Agriculture 


1 2 


Math. 3 or 4 


4 or 2 


English 13 2 


Math. 4 (if not 


Math. 2 or 3 


3 or 4 


Geology 1 


3 


Mil. sci. 2 


taken earlier) 2 


Mil. Sci. 1 


1 


Mil. Sci. 2 


1 


Elective in 


Speech 11 3 


Phys. educ. 


1 


Phys. educ. 


1 


maj. field 3 to 5 


Mil. sci. 2 
Electives in 
maj. field 4 to 6 


IS 


or 19 


18 


or 20 


18 to 20 


18 to 20 




THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hrs. 
Physics 1 & 3 4 
^German, French, 
or Spanish 3 
Electives 11 to 13 



Second Sem. Hrs. 
Physics 3 & 4 4 
♦German, French, 
or Spanish 3 
Electives 11 to 13 



First Sem. Hrs. Second Sem. 
Electives 18 Electives 



nr. 



18 to 20 



18 to 20 



♦Take in Junior or Senior year. 
NOTE: 

Students must take 45 hours in the College of Agriculture in at least five 
subject-matter divisions. 

A student may vary from the above curriculum with the approval of his 
adviser and of the Committee on Courses and Hours. 

The student's adviser should be in the field of the student's major. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN AGRICULTURE 
Agriculture 

Dean Orton and Staff in Agricultuure 
Undergraduate Division 
. Introduction to Agriculture. I. 2 Hrs. A survey of the history and 
practice of the general field ol agriculture with special reference to 
opportunities and problems in West Virginia. 

Mr. Parsons, Mr. Hill, and Staff in Agriculture 



98 Curricular Requirements and Courses op Instruction 



5. Summer Practice. No Hrs. A minimum of 12 weeks on an approved 
farm will be required of each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Agriculture who has not had the equivalent of at least one 
year's farm experience after reaching the age of 14 years. Must be 
done under the direction of the Dean and the Committee on Farm 
Practice and must, be completed before the third year. Open only to 
students deficient in farm practice. 

271. Agricultural Problems and Organizations in West Virginia. II. 2 Hrs. 
Agricultural, topographical, and economic problems. Function of 
farm programs of numerous agencies. Open for senior and graduate 
students in social work, home economics, and agriculture. 

Staff members of Agriculture and Federal Agencier 

280, 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Special work 

may be provided in each of the departments for students having the 

needed qualifications. The consent of the respective department head 

is required. Departmental Staffs 

Graduate Division 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. (See de- 
scription, under this number in each department.) Work for the degree 
of Master of Science consists chiefly of course offerings and no more than 
6 credit hours of research, with special emphasis on a major subject to 
be selected from one of the several departments. Work for the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy is limited to a few selected fields and will 
consist of research as well as the required course work. 

Departmental Staffs 

Agricultural Biochemistry 

Professor Dustman 

Chemistry courses for agricultural and home economics students of under- 
graduate rank are offered in thp College of Arts and Sciences (see Chemistry). 
Graduate work may be pursued under the general research course outlined 
under Agriculture, above 

280, 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

380, 381. 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

CHEMISTRY 

31, 131. Organic Chemistry. I. 4 Hrs. For students in Agriculture and 

Home Economics. PR: Chemistry 2. Mr. Dustman 

218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate years. 

PR for graduate students: Chemistry 106 or equivalent, Chemistry 31 

or 233, and Dairy Husbandry 1; for undergraduates, Chem. 31. 

Mr. Dustman 
220. Chemistry of Anima! Nutrition. II. 4 Hrs. Offered in alternate years. PR: 
Chemistry 6 and 31 and Biochemistry 239, or their equivalents. 

Mr. VanLandingham 



NOTE: For description of the course in general biochemistry see the An- 
nouncements of the School of Medicine. 

Agricultural Economics 

Professor Armentrout, Associate Professor Toben, and Assistant Professors Clarke 

and Porter 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Farm Economics. I. 3 Hrs. Introductory Course. Mr. Armentrout 

102. Farm Economics. II. 3 Hrs. Principles of economics as applied to agri- 
culture Mr. Armentrout 



The College of Agriculture 99 

104. Farm Management. I. 3 Hrs. Principles of choosing, equipping, and 
operating a farm. Mr. Toben 

105. Rural Life. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Toben 
107. Farm Records and Accounts. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Toben 
131. Marketing Agricultural Products. I. 3 Hrs. Principles and practices 

of marketing agricultural products. Mr. Clarke 

160. Dairy Accounting. II. 2 Hrs. A system of accounts which has been 
designated especially for the use of medium-size dairy manufacturing 
plants. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate years. Mr. Armentrout 

230. Cooperative Marketing. I. 2 Hrs. Principles and practices of cooper- 
ative marketing as applied to the marketing of agricultural products 
and the purchase of farm supplies. Mr. Clarke 

235. Marketing Dairy Products. I. 2 Hrs. Milk-marketing practices and 
policies. Mr. Clarke 

250. Agricultural Statistics. I. 3 Hrs. Sources and methods of collecting 
and analyzing agricultural statistics; construction of statistical tables, 
charts, graphs, etc. Mr. Clarke 

280, 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Graduate Division 

340. Advanced Farm Management. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Toben 

341. Production Economics. II. 3 Hrs. Advanced study of economic prin- 
ciples of production with special application to agriculture. 

Mr. Armentrout 

342. Advanced Agricultural Economics. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Armentrout 
380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. 

Agricultural Engineering 

Professor Loxghouse and Assistant Professor Emerson 

2. Farm Shop. II. 2 Hrs. Instruction in woodworking, cold-metal work- 
ing, forge work, sheet-iron working, shaping and tempering tools, 
tool-fitting, harness repair, rope work, and saw conditioning. 
151s. Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation . SII. 4 Hrs. Planning and 
installation of farm land drainage, contour strip cropping, terracing, and 
farm ponds. Staff 

152. Farm Shop. I. 3 Hrs. The place of farm shop on the farm. Construc- 
tion and repair problems including carpentry, metal working, forging, 
fitting tools, repairing harness, and filing saws. Not open to students 
who have had Course 2. 

153. Farm Machinery. II. 3 Hrs. Principles underlying construction, ad- 
justment, care, use, and repair of farm machinery . This will include 
tillage, harvesting, and seeding machinery. PR: Course 2 or 152. 
May be taken concurrently. 

155. Household Equipment. II. 2 Hrs. Planned to help students understand 
the mechanical equipment in the home and its effective use. 

159. Farm Structures. I. 3 Hrs. Fundamental principles of farm-building 
construction. Actual planning, laying out, and construction work dur- 
ing laboratory period. 

170. Rural Electrification. I. 3 Hrs. Fundamentals of electricity and its 
application in the home and on the farm. Open to Agriculture students 
only, or instructor's permission to register. 

252. Advanced Farm Mechanics. I. 3 Hrs. Forging, cold-iron work, tool- 
fitting, woodworking; offers training for teaching shopwork in rural 
high schools. PR: Agr. Engineering 2 or 152. 

253. Advanced Farm Machinery. II. 3 Hrs. Trends and economic use of 
farm machinery. Primarily for graduate vocational agriculture teach- 
ers. PR: Agr. Engineering 153. Open to Agriculture students only or by 
instructor's permission. 



100 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

255. Care and Repair of Home Equipment. II. 2 Hrs. For advanced and 
graduate students. Construction, maintenance, and repair of house- 
hold equipment. Their comparative cost and economic use will be 
studied. 

280, 281. Special Topics. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

The following courses are recommended for Agriculture students who 

wish to choose additional electives in Engineering. 

M.E. 15. Welding, Forming, and Heat Treatment. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

M.E. 11. Machine Shop. 1,11. 2 Hrs. 

M.E. 12. Machine Shop. I, II. 1 Hr. 

M.E. 20. Mechanical Drawing. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Agronomy and Genetics 

Professor Pohlman ; Associate Professors Cartledge, Tyner, and Veatch ; 
Assistant Professor Sciialler 

AGRONOMY 
Undergraduate Division 

1. Farm Crops. I. 4 Hrs. Cereal, forage, and pasture crops. PR: Botany 2. 

Mr. Veatch 

2, 102. Soils. II. 3 Hrs. The properties of soils. PR: Geology 4 and 
Chemistry 31. Mr. Pohlman and 

10. Forest Soils. I. 3 Hrs. Properties of soils in relation to forestry. PR: 
Geology 1 and Chemistry 2. Mr. Pohlman and- 



124. Climatology and Hydrology. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Galpin and Staff 

2C0. Advanced Crops. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Production, classification, and market 
grading with particular, emphasis on forage crops. PR: Agronomy 1. 

Mr. Veatch 

205. Soil Conservation. I. 2 Hrs. Causes of soil erosion and methods for its 
control. One or two half-day field trips will be made during the 
semester. PR: Agronomy 2 or 10. Mr. Tyner 

210. Fertilizers and Soil Fertility. II. 3 Hrs. Soil fertility; theories and 
practices in use of fertilizer. PR: Agronomy 2. Mr. Pohlman 

215. Development and Classification of Soils. I. 3 Hrs. Morphology, genesis 
and classification of soils. Soil survey methods, mapping of an assigned 
area, and characteristics of some important soil series of West Virginia 
and the United States. PR: Agronomy 2 or 10. Mr. Tyner 

220 Pasture Management. II. 2 Hrs. Methods used in establishing and man- 
aging various types of permanent, rotation, and supplementary pastures. 

Mr. Schaller 

230. Soil Physics. II. 3 Hrs. Physical properties of soils in relation to crop 
growth, water movement, and erosion control. Staff 

280, 281. Special Topics. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Graduate Division 

316. Soil Chemistry. II. 3 Hrs. Fundamental chemical properties of soils in 
relation to plant growth; nature and properties of soil colloids; base 
exchange and soil acidity; availability of plant food elements and soil- 
plant interrelationships. Offered in 1947-48 and in alternate years. 

Mr. Tyner 

350, 351. Seminar. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. Recent literature pertain- 
ing to soils and crop production. Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

BACTERIOLOGY 

314. Soil Microbiology. II. 3 Hrs. Occurrence of micro-organisms in soils 
and their relationship to decomposition of organic matter, availability 
of plant nutrients, and soil acidity; technique of isolation and study. 
Offered in 1947-43 and in alternate years. Mr. Pohlman and Mr. Colmer 



The College of Ageiculturi 101 

GENETICS 
Undergraduate Division 
II, (II. Elementary Genetics. I, 1J. 2 Hrs. Elementary study of the prin- 
ciples of heredity Mr. Cartledge 
112. Genetics Laboratory. I, II. 1 Hr. Breeding experiments. Mr. Cartledge 

220. Crop Breeding. II. 3 Hrs. Methods and basic scientific principles 
involved in the improvement of leading cereal and forage crops 
through hybridization and selection. PR: Genetics 111 or 221. 

Mr. Veatch 

221. Genetics. 1. .3 Hrs. Fundamental principles of inheritance. 

Mr. Cartledge 

222. Advanced Genetics. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Genetics 221. Mr. Cartledge 
250, 251. Seminar. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. Recent literature pertain- 
ing to breeding, genetics, and cytology. Staff 

280, 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 to 3 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Graduate Division 
332. Biometry. II. 3 Hrs. Statistical analysis of biological data. Offered 

in 1947-48 and alternate years. Mr 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Animal Husbandry 

Professors Livesay, Rietz, Schneider, and AViLt'ON ; Associate Professors Hyre 
and Clark; Assistant Professors Black and Bletxer 
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Undergraduate Division 
11. Types. Breeds, and Market Classes of Livestock.* I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Wilson 
101. Animal Nutrition.* I. 3 Hrs. Digestion and metabolism of food nutrients, 
nutrient requirements of farm animals, and nutritive values of feeds 
and rations. PR: Chemistry 31. Mr. Schneider 

104. Animal Industry. II. 4 Hrs. Importance of all classes of farm animals 
to land and food conservation. Three lectures and 1 laboratory. 

Mr. Livesay and Staff 
138. Livestock Grading and Selection. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Black 

141. Beef Production. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Livesay 

142. Pork Production. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Black 

143. Advanced Livestock Judging. I. 2 Hrs. Students taking this course 
will be required to participate in a tour of inspection of representative 
flocks, herds, and studs. Staff 

162. Mutton and Wool Production. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Wilson 

163. Horse Production. I or II. 2 Hrs. Emphasis on light-horse production, 
training, and use for pleasure. Mr. Livesay 

166. M>eats II. 2 Hrs. Lectures and demonstrations on the identification, 
selection, and nutritive value of meat cuts. Primarily for home eco- 
nomics students. Mr. Black 

167. Meats. I. 2 Hrs. Farm butchering, curing, and care of meats. Visit 
to one of the large packing houses of Pittsburgh required of all students 
taking this course. Mr. Black 

169. Meat Judging. I. 1 Hr. Mr. Black 

203. Advanced Animal Nutrition. I. 3 Hrs. The chemistry of feeding stuffs 
and of the animal body, as well as of the digestion and metabolism of 
food nutrients. Mr. Schneider 

222. Breeding Farm Animals. II. 3 Hrs. Physiology of reproduction; in- 
heritance; selection, care, and management of breeding animals. PR: 
Genetics 111 or 221. Mr. Livesay 



♦Animal Husbandry 11 and 101 are prerequisite to all other courses in the 
department, including animal pathology courses. 



102 Currioular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

223. Advanced Livestock Production. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Livesay 

224. Advanced Livestock Production. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Wilson 
235, 236. Current Literature. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. Staff 
280, 281. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Advanced 

studies in various phases of animal husbandry or poultry husbandry; 
animal genetics; energy metabolism; protein metabolism; vitamin 
studies; parasitology. Staff 

Graduate Division 

351, 352. Seminar. I, II. 1 Hr. Animal and Dairy Husbandry Staffs 

370. Methods of Animal Husbandry Research. I, II, S. 3 Hrs. A study of 

research methods which are being used in conducting experimental 

work in animal husbandry. Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Available 

to students in all divisions of Animal Husbandry. Staff 

ANIMAL PATHOLOGY 

102. Animal Pathology. II. 3 Hrs. PR: General Zoology. Mr. Rietz 
106. Animal Diseases and Parasite Control. I. 3 Hrs. Two lectures and 1 

laboratory- Mr. Rietz 

206. Parasites and Pathology. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Invertebrate zoology; for non- 
agricultural students, consent of instructor. Mr. Rietz 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

1. Poultry Production. II. 4 Hrs. Prerequisite to all other poultry courses. 

Messrs. Hyre and Bletner 

103. Poultry Feeding and Management. I. 3 Hrs. Factors in poultry pro- 
duction, feeding and management as related to scientific investigations. 

Mr. Bletner 

105. Poultry Judging. I. 2 Hrs. Practice in selection of birds for both 

standard and production qualities. Mr. Hyre 

112. Incubating and Brooding Chicks. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Bletner 

211. Breeding and Selecting Chickens for Meat and Egg Production. I. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Hyre 
213. Turkey Production 1. 2 Hrs. Messrs. Clark and Bletner 

Conservation 

2. Principles of Conservation. II. No credit. Survey of conservation as a 
professional field; study of work to be done by the conservationist. 

Mr. Brooks and Staft 
150. Conservation Practices. II. 3 Hrs. History of conservation develop- 
ment: study of conservation practices in the fields of soil, water, forests, 
and wildlife. Two lectures and 1 laboratory. Mr. Brooks and Staff 

Dairy Husbandry 

Professor Henderson ; Associate Professor Hyatt ; Assistant Professors 
AYeese and Ackekman; Instructor Tylek 

Undergraduate Division 

12. Farm Dairying. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Weese 

102. Ice Cream and Refrigeration. II. 3 Hrs. Offered in 1948-49 and alter- 
nate years. Manufacture of ice cream; principles of refrigeration in- 
volved in the manufacture and storage of dairy products. Mr. Weese 

103. Market Milk. I. 3 Hrs. Offered in 1947-18 and alternate years. Market 



The College of Agriculture io,j 

milk and the manufacture of dry and condensed milk. Mr. Weese 

104. Butter and Cheese. II. 3 Hrs. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. 

Manufacture of butter and various types of cheese. Mr. Weese 

107. Milk and Public Health. I. 2 or 3 Hrs. Mr. Henderson and Mr. Weese 
111. Dairy Production. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Henderson and Mr. Ackerman 

123. Dairy Judging. II. 1 or 2 Hrs. Mr. Hyatt and Mr. Weese 

204. Dairy Technology. II. 4 Hrs. Chemical and bacteriological methods 

used in the technical control of milk and milk products. Mr. Weese 

221. Dairy Cattle. I. 3 Hrs. History of breeds and families of registered 
dairy cattle. Organization and activities of breed associations. 

Mr. Hyatt 

222. Milk Production. II. 4 Hrs. Feeding and management of dairy cattle. 

Mr. Henderson 
280, 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Graduate Division 

351, 352. Seminar. I, II. 1 Hr. Dairy and Animal Husbandry Staffs 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

BACTERIOLOGY 

246. Dairy Bacteriology. II. 3 Hrs. See under "Bacteriology," page 101. 

CHEMISTRY 
218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. See under "Chemistry," page 98. 

Entomology 

Professor Peairs 

2, 102. Entomology. II. 4 Hrs. Biological, morphological, taxonomic, and 
economic phases of the study of insects. PR: Invertebrate zoology. 

Mr. Peairs 

103. Economic Entomology. I. 2 Hrs. Standard practices in insect control; 
methods for study of injurious insects. Professional requirements in 
entomology. PR: Ent. 2 or equivalent. Mr. Peairs 

152. Forest Entomology. I. 4 or 2 Hrs. Insects of importance to the forester; 
recognition and control of insect pests in the forest. Students who have 
credit for Entomology 2 (102) may receive only two hours' credit 
for this course. Mr. Peairs 

201. Survey of Applied Entomology. I. 3 to 5 Hrs. Principles underlying 
the control of insects; cultural, biological, and chemical. Practice in 
biological and control investigations. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 
20 hours in the field of biology. Not open to students who have credit in 
Ent. 102. Mr. Peairs 

204. 205. Taxonomy. I, II, S. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Studies in the 
families and genera of insects of the region; detailed studies in re- 
stricted groups for qualified students. Mr. Peairs 

280, 281. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Advanced 
studies in the field of interest of the student. The following are avail- 
able: life history studies; response of insects to climatic variables; 
insect toxicology; injurious insects. Mr. Peairs 

Graduate Division 

370. Methods of Entomological Research. I, II. 3 Hrs. A study of methods 
which have been proposed and used for the solution of problems arising 
in the study of insect biology. Mr. Peairs 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 



K'4 CUBRIGULAB REQUIREMENTS AM) COURSES OP tNSTRUCTlON 

Horticulture 

Professors Marsh and WESTOVER ; Associate Professors Sudds and Childs; 
Assistant Professor Dye; Instructors Downes and Neal 

Undergraduate Division 

1. Principles of Horticulture. II. 4 Hrs. Vegetable production. Pre- 
requisite to all courses in olericulture. Mr. Westover and Mr. Downes 

102. Principles of Horticulture. I. 4 Hrs. Fruit production and ornamental 
horticulture. Prerequisite to all courses in pomology. 

Mr. Marsh and Mr. Childs 

103. Principles of Horticulture. I. 3 Hrs. Staff 
115. Judging and Identification of Apple Varieties. I. 1 Hr. Two labora- 
tory periods first half of semester. Mr. Childs 

139. Landscape Gardening. T. 3 Hrs. Theory and practice of landscape 
design with special application to home grounds. Mr. Dye 

140. Plant Materials. II. 3 Hrs. Important woody and herbaceous plants 
used in landscape gardening. Mr. Neal 

141. Greenhouse Management. II. 3 Hrs. Practical operation of tempera- 
tures, humidities, disease and insect control, and watering. Mr. Dye 

206. Small-Fruits Production. II. 3 Hrs. A practical and scientific 

study of standard cultural practices in the small-fruit plantation. 

Mr. Childs 

209. Systematic Pomology. I. 3 Hrs. History, botany, and classification 
of fruits. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. Mr. Marsh and Mr. Neal 

212. Commercial Tree-Fruit Production. II. 3 Hrs. Latest methods in 
pruning, spraying, soil culture, and other production practices for fruit 
trees from the practical and scientific standpoint. Mr. Sudds 

213. Harvesting, Packing, and Storage of Fruits. I. 3 Hrs. Instruction in 
maturity standards for harvesting, grading according to national and 
state staudards, and planning and management of packing houses and 
storages. Mr. Marsh and Mr. Childs 

232. Commercial Vegetable Production. II. 2 Hrs. Current methods of 
commerical vegetable crop production, including equipment, soil and 
climatic adaptation, plant raising, soil culture, harvesting, grading, 
and packing. Mr. Westover and Mr. Downes 

233. Systematic Olericulture. I. 3 Hrs. History, botany, and classification 
of vegetable crops. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate years. 

Mr. Westover and Mr. Downes 
280. 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Graduate Division 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Plant Pathology and Bacteriology 

Professor Leach ; Associate Professors Barnett, Colmer, and Taylok ; 
Assistant Professors Clulo and Vaughn 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Undergraduate Division 

41, 141. General Bacteriology. I, II. 4 Hrs. (3 Hrs. for Engineering stu- 
dents). PR: Chemistry 1 and 2. Morphological and cultural characteristics 
of bacteria; interrelation with agriculture and industry. Mr. Colmer 

241. General Bacteriology. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: Chem. I and 2. Open only, with 
consent of instructor, to graduate students not majoring in the department. 
Not open to students having credit for Bacteriology 141. General survey; 
opportunity for study in field of student's interest. Mr. Colmer 



The College of Agriculture 105 

246. Dairy Bacteriology II. 3 Hrs. The role of micro-organisms in market 
milk, in the manufacture of butter, cheese, and fermented milk, and in 
milk hygiene; practice in the preparation of media; making bacterial 
counts in milk, PR: Bacteriology 141. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate 
years. Mr. Colmer 

248. Bacteriological Water Analysis. II. 2 Hrs. Standard bacteriological 
methods used in the routine examination of water and sewage. PR: 
Bacteriology 141. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. Mr. Colmer 

280, 281. Special Topics. I and II. 2 to 3 Hrs. per semester. Mr. Colmer 

Graduate Division 

314. Soil Microbiology. II. 3 Hrs. Occurrence of micro-organisms in soils 
and their relationship to decomposition of organic matter, availability 
of plant nutrients, and soil acidity; technique of isolation and study. 
Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. Mr. Colmer and Mr. Pohlman 

380, 381, 382 383. Research. I, II. 1 to 6 Hrs. Mr. Colmer 

BIOLOGY 

Undergraduate Division 

210. Cytology. I. 4 Hrs. The fundamentals of cell structure and inclusions 
in plants and animals with special attention to nuclear divisions. 

Miss Clulo 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Undergraduate Division 

1C3. Elementary Plant Pathology. I. 4 Hrs. Nature and causes of plant dis- 
seases and methods of controlling them. Mr. Leach and Mr. Taylor 

153. Forest Pathology. II. 4 Hrs. The important diseases of forest and 
shade trees; their causes and methods of control. PR: Botany 2. 

Mr. Leach and Miss Clulo 

202. General Plant Pathology. II. 5 Hrs. Nature of diseases in plants, with 
practice in laboratory methods. PR: Bacteriology 141. 

Mr. Leach, Miss Clulo, and Staff 

203. Mycology. I. 4 Hrs. Lectures, field and laboratory studies of the 
parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Mr. Barnett 

206. Diseases of Economic Plants. SI. 4 Hrs. Mr. Barnett 

280, 281. Special Topics. I. II. 2 to 4 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Graduate Division 

312. Pathological Anatomy. I. 3 Hrs. A study of the abnormal tissue 
changes in plants. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate years. Miss Clulo 

313. Insect Transmission of Plant Diseases. I. 3 Hrs. The role of insects 
in the spread and development of plant diseases and the relationship 
of insects to plant-disease control. PR: Plant Pathology 103 or Ento- 
mology 102. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. Mr. Leach 

351, 352. Seminar. I, II. 1 Hr. Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I, II. 1 to 6 Hrs. Mr. Leach and Staff 

Rural Organization 

Professor Parsons and Associate Professor Hill 

118. Organizations and Clubs for Farm Boys. II. 2 Hrs. Problems involved 
in directing the activities of F. F. A., and similar organizations. 

Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 

134. Methods of Agricultural Extension. I. 2 Hrs. Activities of the county 
agricultural and home demonstrtaion agents and of the agricultural 



106 Curriculak Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

extension program of West Virginia. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate 
years. Mr. Parsons 

*160. Education — Materials and Methods of High-school Teaching of Voca- 
tional Agriculture. I, II. 3 Hrs. Organization and Preparation for 
teaching vocational agriculture in the high school. 

Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 
*224. Education. Student Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 
Education 277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Practice Programs in 
Vocational Agriculture. II. 2 Hrs. Planning programs of supervised 
practice, supervising, and evaluating isuch programs for all-day, part- 
time, and evening school students. Consent of instructor. 

Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 
Education 278. Planning the Long-time Programs and Organizing the Courses 
for Departments of Vocational Agriculture. I. 2 Hrs. For all-day, part- 
time and evening school students. Consent of instructor. 

Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 

280, 281. Special Problems. I, II. 2 to 3 Hrs. per semester. PR: adequate 

ability and training for the work proposed and permission to register. 

Staff 
380, 381. Research. I, and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Staff 



THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

The professional forester's work includes such diversified activities as 
timber production, logging, surveying, park management, forest protection, 
forest-stand improvement, flood control, watershed protection, soil-erosio?i 
control, submarginal land development, restoration of game, stream develop- 
ment, and construction of public camps and summer home sites. The wide 
scope of the modern field of forestry demands a thorough basic training for 
the professional fcresrer. This accounts for the large number of required 
courses in the professional forestry curriculum If the forester wishes to 
specialize in any one branch of the field, graduate work is needed. 

The course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry is 
designed to train the student for a professional forestry career in either 
public or private forestry work. Graduates should be equipped to hold posi- 
tions with the U. S. Forest Service, with the Forestry Division of the IT. S. 
Indian Service, with the Soil Conservation Service, with the National Park 
Service, and with other federal agencies employing professional foresters; 
with the various state forestry departments; and with those private forest 
land owners — both corporate and individual — who employ technical foresters. 

The curriculum includes a two years' broad foundational study of the 
natural, mathematical, and social sciences basic to the field, followed in the 
junior and senior years by more detailed study of forestry principles and 
technique. Many of the courses in the curriculum provide for field labora- 
tories enabling the student to see first-hand applications of the principles 
presented in the classroom and to experiment with the various techniques 
he is learning. 



*See the bulletin, Requirements Applicable to Douroes and to Teacher Certi- 
fication, for additional requirements for certification to teach vocational agrfcul- 

<ure. 



The College of Agriculture 



107 



An important part of the course is the ten weeks' forestry camp attended 
at the end of the sophomore year. At this camp the student is instructed in 
the field practice of land surveying and forest measurements and has oppor- 
tunity to observe various forest operations on both public and private lands. 
Courses are offered also in game management and in other phases of the 
recreational use of public and private lands. 

The Curriculum in Professional Forestry 





FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs, 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Agron. 10 


3 


Bot. 32 


2 


Chem. 1 


4 


Chem. 2 


4 


Bot. 21 


2 


C. E. 6 


2 


Eng. 1 


3 


Eng. 2 


3 


C. E. 5 


4 


For. 4 


3 


For. 1 


1 


For. 2 


1 


Econ. 1 


3 


For. 11 


3 


Math. 2 


3 


Math. 10 


3 


For. 3 


3 


For. 21 


4 


Mil. Sci. 1 


2 


Mil. Sci. 2 


2 


Geol. 1 


3 


For. 170 


1 


Phys. educ 


1 


Phys. educ. 


1 


Mil. Sci. 3 


2 


Mil. Sci. 4 


2 




18 




18 




20 




17 


Forestry 100s — Junior 


Forestry Camp — 10 


Weeks- 


—10 Hours 






THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


For. 114 


3 


For. 112 


4 


Entom. 152 


4 


For. 122 


o 


For. 131 


3 


For. 113 


o 


For. 123 


5 


For. 133 


9 

o 


For. 132 


3 


For. 125 


3 


For. 124 


3 


For. 141 


3 


For. 151 


2 


For. 142 


2 


For. 134 


2 


PI. Path. 153 


4 


For. 171 


1 


For. 143 


2 


For. 135 


3 


Electives 


3 


Phys. 1 & 


3 4 


For. 172 
Electives 


1 
2 


For. 173 


1 







16 17 

Summer Employment by Forest-using Agency 



18 



in 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN FORESTRY 

Professors Percival and Besley; Associate Professors Brooks, Ericksox, 
and Holsoe; Assistant Professors Byers, Dugax, and Tryox 

1, 2. The Profession of Forestry. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. Survey of 
the profession of forestry and of the opportunities available to trained 
men. Required of all freshmen in forestry. Mr. Percival 

3. Dendrology. I. 3 Hrs. Classification, identification, and distribution 
of the timber trees of the United States. PR: Biol. 2. Mr. Core 

4. Dendrology. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Forestry 3. Mr. Core 

5. Land Surveying. I. 4 Hrs. Principles and techniques of land sur- 
veying, including boundary and topographic surveys, location of roads, 
and computation of areas PR: Math. 10. Mr. Baker 
Topographic Mapping. II. 2 Hrs. Practice in lettering and drawing 
topographic maps from field data. Also mapping in the field with 
traverse-board outfits. PR: C. E. 5. Mr. Baker 
Introduction to Forestry Field Practice. S. 6 to 12 weeks. 6 to 12 Hrs. 
Field practice in elementary forest surveying and measurements. Commer- 
cial tree identification and measurement and sample-plot work. Arrange 
with instructor before registering. Mr. Besley and Staff 
Forest Soils. I. 3 Hrs. Properties of soils in relation to forestry. PR: 
Geol. I and Chem 2. Mr. Pohlman 
Si Ivies. II. 3 Hrs. The forest and its environmental factors; site and 
type characteristics. PR: Agron. 10, Botany 21, and For. 4. Mr. Tryon 



6. 



10. 



11 



108 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

21. Forest Mensuration. II. 4 Hrs. Measurement of forest products, trees, 
and stands; timber estimating; introduction to growth and yield. PR: 
Civil Engineering 5. Mr. Byers 

100s. Forestry Camp. S. Ten weeks. 10 Hrs. Field practice in land survey- 
ing, forest measurements, and tree identification; observation of forest 
types, forest improvements, and utilization practices. PR: Civil Engi- 
neering 6 and Forestry 4 and 21. Mr. Byers and Staff 

112. Silviculture. II. 4 Hrs. Silvicultural systems used for obtaining natural 
reproduction; intermediate cuttings; treatment of various species in 
different types. PR: Forestry 11. Mr. Holsoe 

113. Silviculture. II. 3 Hrs. Nursery practice; seeding and planting; all 
phases of artificial regeneration. PR: Forestry 11. Mr. Tryon 

114. Forest Economics. I. 3 Hrs. The place of the forest industry in the 
national economy; forest resources of the United States; exports and 
imports of forest products; current movements within the wood-using 
industry as influenced by economic trends. PR: Econ. 1. Mr. Besley 

122. Forest Mensuration. II. 3 Hrs .The measurement of growth and yield; 
statistical methods applied to forest measurement prohlems. PR: 
Forestry 21. ♦ Mr. Holsoe 

123. Forest Management. I. 5 Hrs. Use of practical silvicultural methods 
on forest tracts; the regulation of the cut in order to obtain a sustained 
yield; the coordination of multiple uses of the same forest; the prepara- 
tion of plans for the profitable management of specific forested areas. 
PR: Forestry 100s and 112. Mr. Besley 

124. Forest Finance. I. 3 Hrs. Cost of producing and harvesting the forest 
crop. Wood production as a business enterprise. PR: Forestry 100s 
and 114. Mr. Besley 

125. Forest Policy and Administration. II. 3 Hrs. Land policy in the United 
States; its historical, legal, and administrative development; the for- 
ester's relations with the public. Organization of public and private 
forest agencies. Mr. Percival 

126. Forest Measurements by Aerial Photographs. II. 2 Hrs. Obtaining 
information on forest types and timber volumes from aerial photographs 
through use of stereoscope, parallax wedge, and other photogrammetric 
devices. PR: For. 11 and 21. Mr. Holsoe 

131. Wood Technology. I. 3 Hrs. The structure and identification of the 
important woods of the United States; their physical properties and 
uses. PR: Forestry 4 (must be accompanied by For. 132). 

Mr. Erickson. 

132. Wood Technology. I. 3 Hrs. Laboratory for Forestry 131. 

Mr. Erickson 

133. Lumbering. II. 3 Hrs. Logging practices and lumber manufacture. 
Logging and mill equipment. Important factors affecting lumber 
grades. PR: Forestry 100s and 131. Mr. Byers 

134. Forest Products. I. 2 Hrs. The production and uses of forest products 
other than lumber and timbers. PR: For. 131 and 1S2. Mr. Erickson 

135. Wood conditioning. I. 3 Hrs. The purposes, effects, and methods of 
seasoning and preserving wood. PR: Forestry 131 and 132. Mr. Erickson 

141. Game Management. II. 3 Hrs. Basic principles of handling wild life 
as a forest crop. (This course is not intended to train wild-life speci- 
alists). In recognition of the importance of fish, game animals, and fur- 
bearing animals in the forest, the course considers the problems of 
the maintenance of a maximum wild-life population. PR: Botany 32 
and Biology 2. Mr. Dugan 

142. Recreational Developments. II. 2 Hrs. Needs of the active and passive 
recreationist and means of supplying facilities for meeting these needs 
on public forests. PR: Civil Engineering 6, and For. 100s. Mr. Brooks 



Thje Coli i «.:. <•! Agriculture L09 

143. The Forest Range. II. 2 Hrs. A survey of basic range management 
technique and practices on forest lands, with consideration of range 
mapping and important forage plants. PR: Civil Engineering 6 and 
Forestry 100s. Mr. Brooks 

144. Forest Zoology. II. 3 Hrs. The relationships of mammals, reptiles, 
amphibians, and fish to the forest, with emphasis on the ecology and 
taxonomy of these groups. PR: Biol. 2 or Zool. 2 or Zool. 3, Mr. Brooks 

145. Life History of Game Animals. II. 3 Hrs. Field and laboratory studies 
of game-bird and game-mammal life histories, with special references to 
management of populations of these species. PR: Biol. 2 or Zool. 2 or 
Zool. 3. Mr. Dugan 

151. Forest Protection. I 2 Hrs. Preventive actions, preparation activities, 
and control of forest fires as practiced on publicly-owned forests. 

Mr. Percival 

152. Forest Entomology. I. 2 or 4 Hrs. Insects of importance to the forester; 
recognition and control of insect pests in the forest. Students who have 
credit for Entomology 2 (102) may receive only two hours' credit in 
this course. Mr. Peairs 

153. Forest Pathology. II. 4 Hrs. The important diseases of forest and 
shade trees; their causes and methods of control. PR: Biology 2 and 
Forestry 131 and 132. Mr. Leach and Miss Clulo 

170, 171, 172, 173. Forestry Problems. I, II. 1 Hr. per semester. (4 Hrs. 

maximum.) Mr. Brooks and Mr. Besley 

177s. Forestry Field Practice, S. 6 to 14 weeks. ,No credit. A refresher field 
practice course in forest surveying, forest measurements, tree measure- 
ments, forest mapping, forest types, and forest management plan techni- 
ques. Arrange with instructor before registering. Mr. Besley and Staff 

178s. Wood Utilization Studies. S. 6 to 14 weeks. No credit. Practical re- 
fresher course in wood technology, wood conditioning, and forest pro- 
ducts. Arrange with instructor before registering. Mr. Erickson and Staff 

180. Farm Forestry. II. 2 Hrs. Principles of forest management and their 
application to the establishment, care, and utilization of the farm woods. 
PR: Botany 2. Professional forestry students may not take this course 
for credit. Mr. Dugan 

181. Farm Game. II. 2 Hrs. Fundamental principles of the natural propa- 
gation and management of game and other wild life on the farm, with 
emphasis on game as a farm crop. (Primarily for students in agri- 
culture.) Professional forestry students may not take this course for 
credit. Mr. Dugan 

182. Hillculture. II. 2 Hrs. Special crops for those areas where farms con 
sist of forest land but where population pressure makes especially inten- 
sive silvicultural practices both feasible and necessary; development of 
hillculture stock; preparation of a hillculture farm plan; marketing re- 
quirements for hillculture crops. PR: Biol. 2 or Bot. 2; Agron. 2 or 10. 

Mr. Tryon 

183. Farm Wood lot Management. II. 3 Hrs. Practical silvicultural methods; 
regulation of the cut in order to obtain continuous production; prepara 
tion of plans for profitable management. PR: For. 180. (No credit for 
professional forestry students.) Mr. Dugan 



THE DIVJSfON OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Instruction in Home Economics 

The Division of Home Economics occupies two floors in the north end 
of Oglebay Hall, where may be found offices, conference rooms, and a small 
departmental library, in addition to classrooms and laboratories well equipped 



110 Curriculak Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

for the teaching of related arts, textiles and clothing, and foods and nutrition. 
Adjacent to the foods laboratories is a family-service unit consisting of a 
kitchen, dining room, and reception room. Additional laboratories are located 
outside Oglebay Hall but in close proximity, namely, the University Rural 
High School, the Home Management House, the Nursery School, and a 
Cafeteria. 

The offerings in the division are designed to meet a wide variety of 
educational needs. One of the first aims is to help the student understand 
herself and her own potentialities and to encourage her to assume pro- 
gressively more and more responsibility for her own development. In addition 
she will be given school and community laboratory experience, under guidance, 
to help her develop judgment in meeting situations, lead her to the belief 
that problems can be solved, and give her increasing confidence in her own 
ability to solve them. 

To assist the student in setting goals and in planning experiences, which 
will help her make progress toward these goals, a special advisory system 
has been set up. Each lower-division student has a faculty adviser and a 
student adviser. The student adviser helps her informally in adjusting to 
her new life as a college student. The faculty adviser counsels the student 
as to courses and assists in solving problems directly or indirectly affecting 
her progress in the university. 

Plan of Work 

The work of the first two years is largely cultural, including courses in 
written and spoken English, literature, and natural and social sciences. In 
addition, basic work in four areas — foods, clothing, art, and management- 
acquaints the student with the field of home economics. Special courses have 
been arranged for the student who wishes to stay in college only two years 
and whose main interest is to prepare for homemaking. She may substitute 
homemaking courses for those in the basic sciences during the first two years. 
During the last two years the student is given the opportunity of specialization 
in one of several vocations. 

Vocations for Home Economists 

West Virginia graduates are now teaching homemaking at junior high 
school, senior high school, and college levels; others are supervising the 
teaching of homemaking. Some may be found serving as home-demonstration 
agents, girls' club leaders, or commercial demonstrators. A considerable 
number are engaged in institutional work as hospital dietitians cr as managers 
of tea rooms, cafeterias, or college dining halls. Others are engaged in 
scientific research or in allied work as laboratory technicians. 

Social service, through either private or government agencies, has claimed 
the interest of a number. Nursery schools have turned to West Virginia 
home-economics graduates for supervisors. Department stores have offered 
a variety of interesting jobs in selling, counselling, interior decoration, and 
other phases of retailing. One or two graduates with a flair for writing have 
found work on women's magazines. New fields are constantly opening up, 
so that the person trained in home economics has an ever-widening choice 
of vocations. 



The College oi A.grici ltuke ! n 

The division endeavors to keep in touch with the various agencies which 
employ home-economics graduates and to assist graduates in finding employ- 
ment. 

The Baccalaureate Degree in Home Economics 

The Division of Home Economics offers courses leading to the granting 
of a B. S. and an A. B. degree in home economics. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics will be conferred 
upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements and offers 128 
hours of college credit including the courses listed below. The student must 
receive at least as many honor points as credits in order to be eligible for 
graduation.* 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL STUDENTS WORKING TOWARD A 

B. S. H. E. DEGREE 

General: Engl, rhetoric, literature, speech (no more than 3 hrs. in latter ), 
12 hrs.: chemistry 8 hrs.; history, psychology, economics, and sociology, 9 hrs. 
(with some work in at least two fields) ; biological science, 8 hrs. (including 
bacteriology) ; physical education, 4 hrs. (Humanities 1 may be substituted 
for 4 hrs. modern European history; Humanities 2 may be substituted for 4 
hrs. English literature.) Total, 41 hrs. 

Home Economics: foods and nutrition, 6 hrs.; management, 5 hrs.; textiles 
and clothing, 5 hrs.; applied art, 4 hrs.; child development, 2 hrs.; electives in 
home economics, 18 hrs. Total, 40 hrs. General electives, 47 hrs. Grand 
total, 128 hrs. 

Sufficient electives are allowed to permit the student to satisfy the 
requirement for a. first-class high school certificate to teach in West Virginia 
or to fulfill the preparatory requirements foi apprenticeship, internship, or 
similar vocational experiences in a variety of fields including those of insti- 
tution management, hospital dietetics food and textile research, retailing, ex- 
tension work, and other governmental services. 

It is suggsted that students carry a maximum of 15 hours while in the 
Home Management House or while doing Student Teaching. 

A student who is working for room and board may not carry more than 14 
hours until she has demonstrated that she is able to maintain an average of 
1.2 or better while working. 

THE A. B. DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Students who wish to offer home economics as a major in the College of Arts 
and. Sciences are referred to the information concerning an A. B. degree with 
a major in home economics. (See page 159.) 

ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE DIVISION 

Students in other colleges wishing to elect courses in home economics 
will find a number of courses available. The following courses are suggested: 
Home Economics 1, 2, 3. 4. 13, 14. 18. 33. 50. 116. 117, 134. 138, and 190. 



*For a complete description of the honor-point system see page ."G. 



112 



Curriculab Requirements and Courszs of Instruction 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

To be classified as a conditional freshman a student must have credit 
for at least 15 units of entrance requirements; to be classified as a regular 
freshman she must have fulfilled all entrance requirements. To be classi- 
fied as a sophomore she must have credit for 25 hours of college work; as a 
junior, 58 hours; as a senior, 92 hours. 

The Suggested Curriculum for the First Two Yeors 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Son. Hrs. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 English 3, 4, 




Speech 3, 


Chem. 1* 


4 


Chem. 2 


4 or 5 


3 


6, or 11 3 


(or) 




History 2 


3 (or) 




Physiology 51 4 


History 1 


3 


(or) 


Humanities 2 


4 


Home Ec. 33 2 


(or) 




Humanities 1 


4 Home Ec. 13 


4 


Home Ec. 50 2 


Humanities 1 


4 


Home Ec. 2 


2 Home Ec. 18 


3 


Phys. educ. 1 


Home Ec. 1 


2 


Home Ec. 3 


2 Biology 1 


4 


Econ. or sociol. 3 


Home Ec. 4 


2 


Phys. educ. 


1 Econ. or sociol. 


3 




Phys. educ.f 


1 




Phys. educ. 


1 





♦Prospective dietitians should elect Chemistry 1 and 2. 

tStudents must elect 4 courses — one from each group: Athletics 9 or 10; 
Dancing 2, 3, 4, or 15; Individual Activity 6, 7, 8, or 57; and Swimming 1 or 16. 

The Suggested Curriculum for Those Who Expect to Terminate Work 

at End of Two Years 



First Sem. 
English 1 
History 1 

(or) 
Humanities 1 
Home Ec. 1 
Home Ec. 4 
Phys. educ. 



FIRST YEAR 
Hrs. Second Sem. Hrs. First Sem. 



SECOND YEAR 

Hrs. Second Sem. Hrs. 



3 English 2 



History 2 
Home Ec. 3 
Home Ec. 2 
Phys. educ. 



Eng. 3, 4, or 5 3-4 

(or) 
Humanities 2 4 
Home Ec. 13 4 
Home Ec. 18 3 
Phys. educ. 1 

Econ. or sociol. 

or psychology 3 



Speech 3, 
6, or 11 
Home Ec. 33 
Home Ec. 50 
Phys. educ. 
Physiology 51 



11 or 12 
Electives 4 to 6 



11 or 12 
Electives 4 to 6 



15 or 16 
Electives 1 to 3 



Electives 



12 
4 to 6 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES 

Freshmen: Music 77 (2 hrs.), Art 12 (3), language (3); 
Sophomores: Home Econ. 105 (2 Hrs.), 117 (2), 180 (2) ; 

The Curriculum for Teachers 



Psychology 1 (3). 
14 (3). 



Students who wish to obtain a high-school certificate to teach home eco- 
nomics must meet the requirements of the State Board of Education and of 
the College of Education. Recommendation for certification is made by the 
division of home economics to the Dean of the College of Education. For re- 
quirements see the bulletin, Regulations Governing Teacher Selections, etc. 



Tin-: College of Agriculture 113 

The head of the Division of Home Economics in the College of Agriculture, 
Forestry, and Home Economics is also a member of the College of Education 
and is the adviser for students wishing to meet the requirements for a high- 
school certificate to teach home economics. 

West Virginia University has been approved by the State Department of 
Education and by the U. S. Office of Education as qualified to train teachers 
of vocational homemaking. 

All students who meet the requirements for vocational certificates in 
home economics as 3et forth in the bulletin, Regulations Governing Teacher 
Selection, Guidance, Training, and Certification, and who maintain an average 
of "C or better in Education 163 and 224 will be recommended for vocational 
certificates. 

Students transferring from other institutions should do so not later than 
the junior year. A minimum residence of the entire senior year is required, 
and students with irregular schedules will require a longer time. 

Major Curricula in Home Economics 

THE TEACHING MAJOR 

(See Teacher Training Bulletin for course requirements) 
RESEARCH IN FOODS AND NUTRITION 

Recommended: English 13 (2 hrs.) ; English 126 (2 or 3); Phys 1 
and 3 (4); Physics 2 and 4 (4); Physiol. 51 (4); Chem. 31 (4); Chem. 105 (4); 
Chem. 106 or 115 (3); Biochem. 239 (4); Math. 3 (4); Math. 4 (2); Math. 5 (4); 
Math. 107 (4); H. Ec. 107 (3); H. Ec. 218 (2); H. Ec. 251 (2); H. Ec. 252 (3). 

TEXTILES AND RETAILING 

Recommended: Sociol. 1 (3 hrs.); Econ. 173 (3): Phys. 1 and 3 (4); H. Ec. 
134 or 135 (3 or 4); H. Ec. 225 (2); H. Ec. 226 (2); H. Ec. 230 (2); Chem. 5 or 105 
(4); Chem. 6 or 106 (3-5); Chem. 31 or 131 (4); Educ. 221 (2); Art 111 (3); 
Psych. 132 (3); English 126 (2-3). Selected courses in business administration. 

NUTRITION AND DIETETICS 

Required: Chem. 31 (4 hrs); Biochem. 239 (4); Physiol. 51 (4); H. Ec. 14 (3); 
H. Ec. 107 (3); H. Ec. 108 (2-4); H. Ec. Ill (2); H. Be. 217 (2); Recommended: 
Chem. 105 (4); Chem. 106 or 115 (3); H. Ec. 109 (2); H. Ec. 110 (2); H. Ec 113 
(3); H. Ec. 218 (2); Econ. 173 (3). (Refer to current A. D. A. requirements.) 

DESIGN 

Required: H. Ec. 117 (2 hrs.); H. Ec. 135 (4); H. Ec. 138 (2); H. Ec. 226 
(2); H. Ec. 230 (2); Psych. 132 (3). Recommended: H. Ec. 136 (2); H. Ec. 173 
(3); H. Ec. 225 (2); Art 11 or 111 (3); Sociol. 105 (3); Econ. 127 (2); Bus. Adm. 
128 (3); Physics 1 and 3 (4). 

EXTENSION, HOME SERVICE, AND COMMERCIAL WORK 

Required: H. Ec. 33 (2 hrs.); H. Ec. 107 (3); H. Ec. 108 (2-4); H. Ec. 120 
(2);H. Ec. 240 (2); H. Ec. 252(3); H. Ec. 254(3); Econ. 173 (3). Suggested elec- 
tives: Speech 11 (3); Speech 120 (3); H. Ec. 50 (2); H. Ec. 190 (2); H. Ec. 
251 (2); Psych. 1 or 3 (3); Pol. Sci. 5 (3); Jour. 112 (2); Mus. 77 (2); Sociol. 3 or 
130 (3); Sociol. 105 (3); Educ. 106 (3); Physics 1 and 3 (4). Selected courses in 
agriculture. 



114 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Required: H. Ec. 50 (2 hrs.) ; H. Ec. 107 (3); H. Ec. 215 (2); H. Ec 240 (2) 

H. Ec. 241 (2); Psych 1 (3); Psych 122 (3); Psych 234 (3); Libr. Sci. 103 (3) 

Sociol. 210 (3); Recommended: Psych. 22*4 (3); Speech 250 (3) and 200 (3) 
Mus. 77 (1). 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor NOER ; Emeritus Professors Colwell and Nesbitt ; Assistant Professors 

Brown, Dietrich, Palmer, Paris, Price, and Wharton; Instructors Boggess, 

Hartson, McAllister, Palmer, and Well en 

(1) Students in the College of Ats and Sciences who major in home 
economics must meet the requirements in that, college and also the depart- 
mental requirements as outlined on page 159. 

(2) Students who wish to obtain the high-school certificate to teach 
home economics must meet the requirements of the State Board of Education, 
the College of Education, and the Division of Home Economics. The B. S. H. E. 
degree in the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics is planned 
to allow sufficient elective to meet these requirements. 

(3) Students from other colleges who wish to elect home economics courses 
without meeting the Science requirements may take Home Economics 1, 2, 3, 4, 
33, 50, 115, 116, 120, 134 or 135, 138, 240, and 241; others by consent of in- 
structor. 

Food and Nutrition 

Instructors McAllister, Palmer, and Wellen 

1. Elementary Foods and Nutrition. I, IT. 2 Hrs. Application of principles of 
human nutrition with particular reference to need of college students. Open 
to all students. Mrs. Palmer 

13. Food Selection and Preparation. I, II. 4 Hrs. Two lectures and two 
laboratories. PR: Chem. 1 and H. E. 1, or consent of instructor. Chemical 
and physical bases for food preparation with enough experimental 
work to give an understanding of the reasons for recommended pro- 
cedures for the preparation of food products of high quality. Demonstra- 
tions, discussions, and workshop. Miss McAllister 

14. Meal Planning, Preparation, and Service. I, II. 3 Hrs. One lecture and 
one 3-hr. laboratory. PR:H. E. 1 and 13, or consent of instructor. Prob- 
lems in selection and purchase of foods and the planning, preparing, and 
serving of meals, including wise use of time and energy. 

Miss McAllister and Miss Nesbitt 
105. Food Preservation. I. 2 Hrs. One lecture and one laboratory. PR: 
H. E. 13 or equivalent. PR or parallel: Bact. 141. Fundamental prin- 
ciples involved in preservation of foods by canning, drying, fermenta- 
tion, curing, and ^ freezing as applied in the home and in centers 
equipped for quantity work. Miss McAllister 

107. Nutrition. I. 3 Hrs. Two lectures and one laboratory. PR: Chem. 2, 
H. E. 13, and Physiol. 51 or 151, or consent of instructor. Food needs 
as affected by such factors as age, sex, and activity, nutritive value of 
common foods, and planning of adequate diets at different cost levels. 

Mrs. Palmer 
113. Experimental Cookery. I. 3 Hrs. Two laboratories of 3 hours each. 
PR: H. E. 14, Chem. 31. Utensils, ingredients, temperature, manipula- 
tion, and cooking methods as they affect quality of cooked products. 
Offered in alternate years. Miss McAllister 



The College oe Agriculture 11! 



114. Group Feeding. I, II. 1 Hr. (Arr.) PR: H. E. 13. Mrs. Wellen 

161. Requirements for Normal Human Nutrition. I, II. 3 Hrs. Lecture and 

demonstration. Two 2-hour and one 1-hour class per week. For 

students in other colleges who are interested in nutrition. Staff 

215. Nutrition Work with Children. II. 2 Hrs. PR: H. E. 13. 14, 107. One 
lecture, one laboratory. Malnutrition among children of elementary- 
school age. Causes, prevention, and treatment. Planning and preparing 
luncheons for a group of children; weighing; measuring; checking food 
habits and making home visits. Staff 

216. Community Nutrition Problems. II. 2 Hrs. Two hours of lecture, 
plus field work. PR: H. E. 13, 14, 107, 215. or consent of instructor. 
Includes organizations and agencies through which these problems 
may be solved. Staff 

217. Diet in Disease. II. 2 Hrs. PR: H. E. 14, 107. Adaptations of the normal 
diet for diseases whose prevention or treatment is largely influenced 
by diet. Offered in alternate yars. Staff 

218. Advanced Nutrition. I. 2 Hrs. Topics discussed will depend somewhat 
upon needs and interests of students participating. Critical review of 
current literature and of present researches. PR: physiology (3 hrs.), 
H. E. 107, or equivalent background. Offered in alternate years. Staff 

Institution Management 

Assistant Professor Price 

108. Quantity Cookery. I" and II. 2-4 Hrs. Application of principles of 
cookery to preparation of food in large quantity. Use of standardized 
formulas, calculation of co.sts, and use of institutional equipment. The 
Cafeteria is used as laboratory. 

109. Institution Accounting. 2 Hrs. Current procedures in accounting for 
institutions. Preparation of budgets, food-control records, financial 
statements, and reports. 

110. Institution Buyiny. 2 Hrs. Quantity-food purchasing for institutions. 
Observation in local wholesale markets and warehouses. 

111. Institution Organization and Management. 2 Hrs. Principles of or- 
ganization and management of institutions of various types. PR: H. E. 
108. 

112. Laboratory*Practice In Institution Management. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: H. E. 
14 and consent of instructor. (Arranged.) Experience under super- 
vision in planning, preparing, and serving food in an institution. 
Selection of place and type of experience to be determined by needs 
cf students. PR: H. E. 108 and 111. 

Textiles and Clothing 

Assistant Professor Dietrich 

2. Elementary Clothing. I, II. 2 Hrs. Problems in selection, purchase, 

construction, and conservation of clothing. 
18. Intermediate Clothing. 3 Hrs. Two 3-hr. laboratories. Clothing needs 
of the family; buying and alteration of ready-made garments. Experi- 
ence in construction with particular emphasis on pattern adaptation and 
remodeling. 
115. Clothing Selection. I, II. 2 Hrs. Two lectures. Selection of clothing 
for the whole family from the point of view of design, color, and 
economy. Clothing inventories and buying plans. PR: H. E. 3, H. E. 2, 
or consent of instructor. 



li«i Curriculae Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



116. Clothing Techniques. [I. 2 Hrs. Not open to home economics majors. 
Techniques for simple garment construction, remodeling, alteration, 
and repair. Problems adapted to needs of individual students. Es- 
pecially planned for Arts students and young homemakers. 

117. Textiles. I, II. 2 Hrs. Lecture and laboratory combined. Textile fibers 
and fabrics studied with a view to their use in dress and in the home. 
PR: H. E. 2 and 3 or consent of instructor. 

120. Selection and Construction of Clothing. I, II. 2 Hrs. Two laboratories. 
Construction of wool and rayon garments. Pattern alteration and 
adaptation. Making over clothing. PR: H. E. 3, H. E. 2, or consent 
of instructor. 

225. Advanced Clothing Construction. II. 2 Hrs. Two 2-hr., laboratories. 
Tailoring, draping on the dress form, coat making, and special finishes. 
PR: H. E. 18, 115, 117, 120, or consent of instructor. 

226. Advanced Textiles. II. 2 Hrs. Two 2-hour periods which combine 
lecture and laboratory. Major textile fibers, and alternates among the 
lesser-used fibers. Commercial laundry and cleaning establishment. 
Fur fibers. PR: H. E. 117, chemistry, and Econ. 1 or 173, or their 
equivalent. 

Applied Arts 

Assistant Professor Palmer; Instructor Wellen 

3. Art Applied to Personal Problems. I, II. 2 Hrs. Study of principles 
of design intended to help college students meet the problems of daily 
living. Problems may include room arrangement, clothing design, etc. 

Miss Palmer 
33. Present-day Housing. II. 2 Hrs. PR: H. E. 3 or consent of instructor. 
Factors to be considered in solution of problems of providing housing 
for the family. Special attention to low-cost living. Planning for the 
home, cost of furnishing, and maintenance. ^Laboratory practice in 
making improvement, ^for rooms, apartments, and housing, using ma- 
terials commonly found in rural communities and small towns. 

Miss Palmer 

134. House Decoration. II. 3 Hrs. for non-majors. One lecture and 2 
laboratories. Materials and furnishings that go into decoration of a 
home, with emphasis on cost, buying, reconditioning, and furnishing. 

Miss Palmer 

135. Home Planning and Furnishing, I, II. 4 Hrs. Two lectures and two 
laboratories. Fundamentals of planning arranged to develop better 
understanding of house structure and home needs. Discussions on 
home decorating based on various income levels and suited to various 
communities and needs. PR: H. E. 3. Miss Palmer 

136. Advanced Home Planning and Furnishing. II. 2 Hrs. Two laboratories. 
PR: H. E. 3 and 33 or 135 or consent of instructor. Miss Palmer 

138. Home Crafts. I, II. 2 Hrs. Two laboratories. Knitting, crocheting, 
decorative stitchery, leather-tooling, glove-making, children's toys, 
weaving. Miss Palmer 

230. Costume Design. I. 2 Hrs. Two laboratories. Techniques of figure 
and fashion drawing. Problems in designing costumes and ensembles 
for the individual and other members of the family. Study of historic 
costume as it affects present-day fashions. PR: H. E. 3, 18, 117, and 120, 
or consent of instructor. Mrs. Wellen 



The College op Agriculture 117 



Health and Child Care 

Instructor Hartson 

240. Child Development. I, II. 2 Hrs. Two lectures. Study of the child 
from prenatal period through adolescence. The University Nursery 
School is used for observing pre-school children — each girl spends 1 or ? 
hours a week observing and assisting. 

241. Observation and Participation in Nursery School. I, II. 1-2 Hra 

Home Management 

Assistant Professor Paris, Instructor Wellen, and Staff 

4. Management. I, II. 2 Hrs. Simple problems in the management of 
time, energy, and other resources. Practical application to problems of in- 
dividual members of class. Miss Paris and Mrs. Wellen 

251. Mechanics of the House. I, II. 2 Hrs. Two lectures. Work areas of 
the house. Kitchen planning and efficiency. Standards in selection of 
equipment for cleaning and for the kitchen and laundry as they apply 
to machines, heat, refrigeration, and electricity. Care of equipment. 
PR: 2*5 hrs. of home economics or consent of instructor. Staff 

252. Home Management Laboratory. I, II. 3 Hrs. Arranged. Emphasis 
on satisfying family life and social relationships. Approximately 5 
weeks of house residence, and 1 hour of discussion each week through- 
out the semester. PR: 25 to 30 Hrs. of home economics. Miss Paris 

254. Home Management (Economic Problems of the Home). I, II. 3 Hrs. 
Three lectures. Economic problems of the American family. Standards 
of living, budgeting and account keeping, buying problems. Value of 
household production. Providing for the future. PR: 33, 4, and 13. 

Miss Paris 

Home Economics Education 

Professor Noer; Assistant Professor Brown: Instructor P>oggess 

Ed. 163. Materials and Methods in Home Economics. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Miss Boggess 
Ed. 262. Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Miss Noer 

[For additional courses, see Summer Session Bulletin) 

General Courses 

Professor Noer and Staff 

50. Management in Family Living. II. 2 Hrs. PR: H. E. 4 or consent of 
instructor. Influence of home conditions on families and family mem- 
bers. In considering ways of meeting every-day problems of families, 
an attempt will be made to apply the findings of science and the 
techniques of management in such a way as to help one achieve satis- 
faction in living. Mrs. Wellen 
160. Problems in Home Management and Family Living. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 
A general course dealing with various phases of family life and home 
management. Open to juniors and seniors not majoring in home eco- 
nomics. Mrs. Palmer 
180. Problems in Home Economics. I and II. 1 to 4 Hrs. Staff 
190. Home Nursing. If. 2 Hrs. Mrs. Palmer 
270. History of Home Economics. I, II. 1 Hr. One lecture. Miss Noer 
280. Problems in Home Economics. I and II. 1 to 4 Hrs. Staff 



118 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



The College of Arts and Sciences 
ORGANIZATION 

The University, through its liberal arts college, offers that academic train- 
ing which is so essential today as a foundation for good citizenship, enlightened 
leadership, and effective professional or technical training. It puts thorough- 
ness above breadth of offerings. It provides a curriculum rigid enough to 
conserve the best in the cultural subjects, yet elastic enough to meet the vary- 
ing talents and aptitudes of individual students. 

Present-day standards in business, industry, and the professions are be- 
coming more and more exacting. Increasing emphasis is being placed upon a 
liberal education as a foundation for technical or professional work. As a 
consequence, the paths to the professions lead through this college. Pre- 
professional curricula have been arranged in law (three years), education 
(two years), medicine (two, three, or four years), dentistry (two, three, or 
four years), nursing, social work, journalism, and medical technology. 

The College of Arts and Sciences includes a lower division and an upper 
division. The lower division consists of the work of the first and second 
years, and the upper division consists of the work of the third and fourth 
years. 

The instruction in the College of Arts and Sciences is administered through 
the following departments: 

Art; biology; chemistry; classics; economics and business administration; 
English language and literature; geology, mineralogy, and geography; Ger- 
manic languages and literatures; history; home economics; library science; 
mathematics; philosophy and psychology; physics; political science; Romance 
languages and literatures; sociology; social work; and speech. 

Two baccalaureate degrees are granted in this College: Bachelor of Arts 
(A.B.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) The Bachelor of Arts degree is con- 
ferred upon those who pursue the four years of academic work in the College 
or upon those who pursue three years of work in this College and one year 
in either the College of Law or the School of Medicine. 1 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon those who pursue the 
combined scientific and medical courses, or special curricula in chemistry, in 
geology, in business administration, or in social work. 1 

Standing Committees 

SCHOLARSHIP: Messrs. Winter (chairman), Harris, Ford, Spiker, and Smith 

(secretary) . 
INSTRUCTIONAL POLICIES AND PRACTICES: Messrs. Siiortridge (chairman), 

Crocker, Taylor, Frasure, Morris, Tower, Ashburn, and Collett; Miss 

Turner. 
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE ON GENERAL EDUCATION: Messrs. Crocker 

(chairman) , Curtis, Lazzell, Spiker, Strausbaugh, and Vest; Miss Turner. 
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' EDUCATION: Messrs. ASHBURN 

(chairman) , Curtis, Lazzell, Wherry, Coke, Davis, and Crocker. 



'See page 58, "Classification of Students." 



The College of Arts and Sciences 119 



Main Objectives 



The curriculum of the College of Arts aud Sciences has certain main 
objectives. 

1. General Culture. The work of the lower division is intended to 
complete what is usually termed "a general education." It rounds out the 
program of studies pursued in the high school and promotes the full deve- 
lopment of the student (1) as an individual and (2) as a member of society. 
Ideally, the student should undergo a well-proportioned development intel- 
lectually, spiritually, physically, and emotionally. The end of such develop- 
ment should be an inner balance or stability on the basis of which further 
growth can take place. The development of the individual as a member 
of society is to be measured in terms of his or her usefulness and sense 
of responsibility to the social order. The student should develop the 
capacity for intellectual participation as a citizen in the community, the 
state, the country, and the world. A general education should, therefore, 
provide for all students a meaningful experience appropriate to the in- 
dividual and social needs which all citizens have in common as members 
of a free society in the contemporary world. 

2. Specific attributes. Most of the attributes of a general education can 
be placed in one of three categories: (1) attitudes, (2) areas of know- 
ledge, and (3) skills. 

The following attitudes should be attained as the result of a general 
education: 

(1) An attitude of tolerance or open-mindedness, characterized by a 
cosmopolitan outlook that will enable the student to see beyond 
the limits of his own profession, his own economic status, and 
his own country ; 

(2) An attitude of truth-seeking characterized by scientific objectivity 
and motivated by intellectual curiosity; 

(3) An attitude of intelligent appreciation towards nature and the 
arts that will, as far as the student's endowments will permit, 
help him in his aesthetic and ethical choices; 

(4) An attitude of dispassionate self-appraisal, based on an understand- 
ing of his own nature and characterized by an awareness of his 
own mental strengths and weaknesses. 

The areas of knowledge which should be the common possession of 
educated persons may be conveniently grouped in two divisions: 

(1) A knowledge of man as a social and intellectual being, of his 
place in contemporary civilization, and of that civilization's place 
in the history of man; 

(2) A knowledge of man as an organism and of man in his relation, 
direct or indirect, to the biological and physical environment in 
which he lives. 

Three basic skills are regarded as indispensable to all educated persons: 



120 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

(1) That of self-expression or communication, involving writing, speak- 
ing, reading, and listening; 

(2) That of calculation, i. e., a knowledge of, and some skill in, basic 
mathematics. 

(3) A familiarity with at least one foreign language, not only as a 
useful skill, but also as a means of promoting tolerance and sym- 
pathetic understanding of peoples who do not speak our language. 

Courses Recommended 

Two types of courses are recommended to all students in the lower di- 
vision as common means for fostering the attributes of mind and character 
which a general education should develop in the student: 

(1) Courses for the promotion of basic skills: (a) calculation and 
(b) communication; 

(2) General introductory courses for the elementary but organically 
integrated study of four fields of human knowledge: (a) Biological 
Science, (b) Social Science, (c) Physical Science, and (d) Hu- 
manities. 

Opportunity for Specialization 

The work of the upper division is intended to provide intensive study 
■in one or two fields of knowledge. It is based on the belief that an educated 
man or woman should not only know the fundamentals of several branches 
of study but should have a rather thorough knowledge of some selected 
field. In the upper disivion, therefore, the student concentrates on a 
major and one or two minors. The curriculum is sufficiently flexible, how- 
ever, to meet the needs and tastes of individual students without at the 
same time exposing the student to the disadvantages of a free elective 
system. 

Special Provisions for the Junior Certificate 

Experience has shown that students whose average in high-school 
subjects was below 75 percent, or students who ranked in the lowest one- 
fourth of the high-school graduating class, probably will not succeed in 
the regular college curriculum. Nevertheless, such students may, by wise 
selection of studies, profitably spend one or two years in college. Other 
students for financial or other reasons may not be able to attend college 
for more than one or two years. It is believed that students in either 
group may spend their time more profitably taking courses in which they 
are particularly interested from a cultural or vocational point of view 
than by following the curriculum leading to the A. B. degree. Students 
who are not candidates for the A. B. degree but who earn 64 hours of 
college credit and 04 honor points including general University require- 
ments, in residence in this college will be awarded the Junior Certificate 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



The College of Ajits and Sciences 121 

Advisers 

Lower Division. Each student in the lower division is assigned to an ad- 
viser who will assist, in registration and who will have general supervision 
over the work of the student. Electives are chosen and changes in the program 
are made with the approval of the adviser. Students are urged to confer with 
advisers in respect to any difficulties or mal-adjustments in college life. 

Upper Division. Each student in the upper division is assigned to an ad- 
viser of the department to which the major subject belongs. The program of 
study and all changes in class assignments must be approved by the adviser. 

The Major Subject 

In the upper division the student concentrates on a major and one or two 
minor subjects selected from the following list of subjects: 

Art French Physics 

Biology Geology Political Science 

Botany German Psychology 

Chemistry History Social Work 

Classics Home Economics Sociology 

Economics Library Science Spanish 

Business Mathematics Speech 

English Philosophy Zoology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
General Requirements for All Degrees 

Foreign Language. Fewer than 6 hours in an ancient or modern language 
will not be counted towards any degree, diploma, or certificate in this College 
unless work in the same language has been offered for entrance. 

Electives. At least 6 hours must be taken in each subject as an elective, 
but no more than 9 hours in isolated courses of less than 6 hours each, selected 
with the approval of the adviser, may be offered. 

In addition to the regular elective work in the College of Arts and Sciences 
which is offered by the faculties in other colleges, work not to exceed 15 hours 
in the College of Law, the College of Agriculture, i the College of Engineering 
and the School of Mines,- the School of Music, 3 the School of Physical 
Education and Athletics, 4 the School of Journalism, or 12 hours of upper- 
division work in Military Science and Tactics, or 20 hours in .the College of 



x In addition to the 15 hours, the following- courses in agriculture are regular 
electives in the College of Arts and Sciences: Farm Economics 131 and all courses 
in entomology, genetics, and plant pathology. (See the special curriculum for the 
A. B. and B. S. in Agriculture.) 

2 The engineering and mining electives include Chemical Engineering 101, 202, 
205, 206, 210, 220, and 221; Civil Engineering 1, 2, 3, 110, and 115; Electrical Engi- 
neering 100, 102, 103; Mechanical Engineering 20, 21, 26, 29, 221, and 222; Mechanics 
101, 102, 103, and 104; and Mining Engineering 106, 202, 203, and 204. In addition 
the student may elect with the consent of his adviser, when his major is Physics, 
Mechanical Engineering 101 to 107 (10 hrs.); and Ch. E. 100s and 235s (4 hrs.). 

3 The music electives include Theory of Music 1, 2, 3, 4, 72, 79, 109 to 118, 180 
to 183, 240, 241, and 281; Ensemble 153 to 156; classes in orchestra instruments 
191 to 196; Men's Glee Club, Women's Glee Club, and University and Community 
Orchestra; and piano or voice or violin or pipe organ or band and orchestra in- 
struments. 

4 The electives in physical education are: P. E. 77, 151, 167, 277, and Safety 
Education 281. 



122 Curricular Requirements and Courses of [nstrucmon 



Education, may be included in the list of elective credits offered by students 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. The total number of hours elected 
from other colleges shall not, however, exceed 24 hours in all. 

The course in general biochemestry is available (without additional fees) 
in the School of Medicine. 

Major Subject. The maximum amount of credit allowed in any one de- 
partment is ordinarily 40 hours. Exceptional cases involving extension of 
hours in the major must have the previous approval of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences is con- 
ferred upon any student who complies with the general regulations of the 
University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance, college, and departmental 
requirements, and completes any one of the following courses of study: 

A. Regular course (128 hours) 

B. Pre-Medical course (128 hours) 

C. Combined courses: 

(a) Arts and Law (124 hours) 

(b) Arts and Medicine (128 hours) 

Students transferring to West Virginia University from other institutions 
should ordinarily do so not later than the beginning of the third year. Such 
students must meet all the requirements of the lower division. All deficiencies 
must be met as soon as possible after admission to this College, whereupon 
such student may register regularly in the upper division. 

Maximum and Minimum Work. A student who has made an average the 
preceding semester of "B" or better while carrying at least 16 hours may en- 
roll for a maximum of 19 hours without petitioning the Scholarship Commit- 
tee. A student who has made an average in the preceding semester of "C" or 
better while carrying at least 16 hours may without petitioning enroll for a 
maximum of 18 hours, 36 hours for the year, provided that no more than 34 
hours are academic work. 

Note 

In the following departmental curricula the number of the course is 
indicated in bold face type. The figure in the parentheses immediately follow- 
ing refers to the value in semester credit hours offered for the course. 

A. Regular Course (128 Hours) 

Four Vears in the College of Arts and Sciences 
Lower-division Curriculum 
(a) General University Requirements. 
Military science 1 — 6 hours. 
Physical education (men) 2 — 2 hours. 
Physical education (women) 1 ' — 4 hours. 



The Ooli i:<.i: of Arts and Sciences 123 

'b) Science. At least 8 hours of a laboratory science chosen from the follow- 
ing list: botany, chemistry, geology, physics, zoology, biology, psychology, 
physical science. 

(c) Foreign language. To be eligible for graduation a student must have 
completed twelve semester hours in a foreign language in college or two 
units for entrance and six hours in the same language in college. 

(d) English composition. Ordinarily 6 hours of English composition (Eng- 
lish 1 and 2) will be required of all freshmen. In case a freshman is not 
qualified to meet the requirements in English 1, as shown by placement or 
other tests, he (or she) will be assigned to English 1C, which carries 3 
hours of University credit. Upon the successful completion of the wo: k 
in English 1C the student will register for the regular work in English 1. 

(e) Additional. At least 6 hours in each of three of the following: 

( 1 ) English (additional to d), or speech. 

(2) Foreign language (additional to c). 

( 3 ) Mathematics. 

( 4 ) History. 

( 5 ) Political science. 

( 6 ) Economics or sociology. 

( 7 ) Philosophy and psychology. 

(8 ) Home economics. 

( 9 ) Science (additional to b). 

(10) General introductory courses. 

(11) Art. 

(f) Electives, under the supervision of the adviser, to make a total of 64 hours. 
Ordinarily freshmen should register for required courses. Electives should 
be used in the second year chiefly in meeting the preliminary require- 
ments of the departments in which students expect to do the work of 
the major (or minors) in the upper division. 

Upper-division Curriculum 

1. A major sequence of 18 to 24 hours of upper-division courses, preceded by 
the proper lower-division courses prescribed as preparation for the major. 
This work should represent a coherent and progressive sequence of 
courses as outlined in the departmental announcements. The major sub- 
ject will be selected when the student registers in. the upper division, but 
the student must plan the work in the lower division in such a way as will 
meet the departmental requirements for the major and minor. 

2. A minor sequence of 9 to 12 hours of upper-division courses, preceded by 
the proper lower-division courses, in some department closely related to the 
major department. At the option of the major department, a second minor 
of 6 hours may be required in a second department closely related to the 
major department. 



1 Military science is required of all male students except those who at the time 
of matriculation are 23 years of age or have completed no less than 58 hours of 
work, and all who have credit for 6 hours of military science or 1 unit of entrance 
credit in military academy. Students must register for military science upon 
their entrance into the University and continue in the course until the full re- 
quirement has been met or until a regular examination card is filed in the Regis- 
trar's office. 

2 Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the first year 
of residence, and four hours of physical education for women, to be taken during 
the first and second years in residence, are required for graduation of students 
presenting fewer than 58 semester hours, unless previous credit has been allowed. 



124 



CUKRICULAB REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 



3. Electives, under the supervision of the departmental adviser, to make a 
total of 128 hours.' At least 52 of the 64 hours in the upper division must be 
selected from upper-division courses. 3 A departmental adviser may permit 
a student in the upper division to elect lower-division courses to an amount 
not exceeding 12 hours when such action will be an advantage to the 
student in connection with the major or minor sequence, but honor points 
will count only at the rate of 1 honor point per credit hour. 

X A student may decrease the total number of hours required for graduation 
by doing; work of superior quality. For details of this plan see pag/e 56. 

3 A candidate for the B. S. in Chemistry should present 56 hours in upper- 
division courses. 

B. Pre-Medical Curricula 1 

The following sequence of courses is worked out for the general guidance 
of students who are preparing for the study of Medicine. It includes all the 
required subjects. While the pre-medical student is meeting the minimum 
requirements of the School of Medicine as stated in the General Catalogue, the 
medical faculty prefers that he use his elective hours to secure a broad, gen- 
eral training rather than to secure a large number of credits in any one spe- 
cial field. Leading medical educators in the United States today also are 
definitely in favor of a good general training rather than extensive specializa- 
tion in the so-called pre-medical sciences. 



FIRST YEAR 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem,. 
English 1 
Chemistry 3 
Biology 1 or 
Zoology 1 4 

Modern lang. or 
Latin i 

Mil. sci. ] 

Phys. educ. ] 



Hrs. 
3 

4 



16 



Second Sem. Hrs. 

English 2 3 

Chemistry 4 4 

Zoology 2 4 

Modern lang. or 

Latin 3 

Mil. sci. 1 

Phys. educ. 1 



16 



Hrs. 



First Sem. 
English 13 or 
English 3 2 or 3 
Physics 1 & 3 4 
Chemistry 5 4 

Zoology, or 

math.,* or 

Psychol. 1, or 

cultural 

group t 3 

Modern lang. 3 
Mil. sci. 2 



Second Sem. 11 is. 
English 14 or 
English 4 2 or 3 
Physics 2 & 4 4 
Chemistry 15 3 
Zoology, or 

Math. 10*, or 

Psychol. 1, or 

cultural 

groupt 3 

Modern lang. 3 
Mil. sci. 2 



THIRD YEAR 

First Sem. Hrs. 

Chemistry 163 3 

and 
Chemistry 136 6 
Zoology 231* 4 
Zoology group, or mathematics, or Psy- 
chology 101 3 
Cultural groupt 12 
Related science groupt or modern 
language 4 to 6 



32 or 34 



17 or 18 
FOURTH YEAR 



16 or 17 



Second Sem. Hrs. 

Chemistry group 2 to 6 

Zoology group (including 231)* 2 to 6 
Cultural groupt 12 

Related science groupj 6 

Modern language group or electives 
as needed to complete hours required 
for graduation. 



^A specific statement concern 
Medicine will be found on page 45. 



entrance requirements to the School of 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



125 



C. Combined Courses 

ARTS AND MEDICINE 

Course A. Students receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree upon the com- 
pletion of four years of pre-medical work (128 hours), and the Bachelor of 
Science Degree at the completion of two years of medicine. 

Course B. Students who enter the School of Medicine after the com- 
pletion of the first three years (90 hours exclusive of military and physical 
education) of the pre-medical curriculum receive the Bachelor of Arts degree 
upon the completion of the first year of medicine, and the Bachelor of Science 
degree upon the completion of the second year of medicine. 

Students who are working toward the combined A. B. degree described in 
Course B above while taking the courses in the School of Medicine must 
also be registered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Modern Foreign Language Requirements: 

Course A requires a reading knowledge of both French and German, with 
a minimum requirement of 18 hours. Course B requires a reading knowledge 
of either German or French, with a requirement of 12 hours, which may be 
divided between the *two languages by students who present two units uf either 
language for entrance. 

D. Pre-Denral Courses 

The following courses are planned for students preparing for the study 
of dentistry. In case a student expects to enter a certain school of dentistry 
these courses may be changed to suit his needs. 

(1) TWO-YEAR COURSE 

A course preparing for schools of dentistry requiring for entrance two 
years of pre-dental work. This course has, in addition to the minimum 
requirements, certain courses of general cultural value. 

SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hrs. Second Sem. Hrs. 





FIRST YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Chemistry 3 


4 


Chemistry 4 


4 


Biology 1 


4 


Zoology 3 


4 


German 




German or 




or French 


3 


French 


3 


Mil. sci. 


1 


Mil. sci. 


1 


Phys. educ. 


1 


Phys. educ. 


1 



16 



16 



Physics 1 & 3 4 

Chemistry 15 3 

and 

Chemistry 63 3 

Psychol. 1 or 3 

Zoology 231 4 
German, French 

or English 3 3 

Mil. sci. 2 



Physics 2 & 4 4 

Chemistry 36 6 
Psychol. 1 or 

Zoology 210 3 
German, French, 

or English 4 3 

Mil sci. 2 

18 



18 or 19 



♦Recommendations — Many medical schools require or recommend 6 hours of 
mathematics; some recommend that Zoology 23l (Comparative Anatomy) and 
courses in chemistry he taken the year before entering medical school; many 
require and many recommend a knowledge of Latin. The schedule provides for 
all these requirements and recommendations. 

tCultural group — To be chosen from English, humanities, economics, sociol- 
ogy, history, political science, philosophy, speech, foreign language, education, 
music. 

^Related science group — To be chosen from biology, botany, physics, math- 
ematics, geology, psychology, genetics, pharmacy, physiology. 

2 A specific statement concerning entrance requirements to the School of 
Medicine will be found on page 45. 



126 



Curbiculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



(2) THREE-YEAR COURSE 

A course preparing for schools of dentistry requiring for entrance three 
years of pe-dental work. The first two years (60 hours) of this course 
are identical with course B except that, during the second year, French 
or German is taken. Students who enter an approved school of dentistry 
after completion of this course (90 hours exclusive of military and physical 
education) receive the Bachelor of Arts degree upon completion of the 
first year of dentistry, provided their applications receive approval by the 
Scholarship Committee. 

THIRD YEAR: English 3 (3 hrs.) and 4 (3); economics or sociology or 
history or political science or modern language (18); Chemistry 107 (2*) and 
238 (5); physics or psychology or elective (3). Total, 34 hrs. 

(3) FOUR-YEAR COURSE 

A course preparing for schools of dentistry requiring for entrance four 
years of pre-dental work. On completion of this course (128 hours) students re- 
ceive the Bachelor of Arts degree. The first three years of this course are 
identical with Course 2. 

FOURTH YEAR: chemistry group (2-6); zoology group (2-6); cultural 
group (12); related-science group (6); modern-language group or electives as 
needed to complete the 128 hours for graduation. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Xot hading to degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences 

(A) Pre-Nursing Curriculum 

The following arrangement of courses is worked out for the general guid- 
ance of students who are preparing for the profession of nursing. This curric- 
ulum includes all subjects generally required by professional schools of nursing. 
The tendency in nursing education is toward establishment of a requirement 
of at least two years of college work preparatory to entering a school of nursing. 
Students are advised to use their elective hours in the direction of a broad, 
general education and, if possible, to complete the requirements for the A. B. 
degree. 



First Sem. 
English 1 
Chemistry 3 
Zoology 1 
Lang, or elec- 
tive 
Phys. educ. 



FIRST YEAR 
Hrs. Second Sem. 

3 English 2 

4 Chemistry 4 
4 Zoology 2 

Lang, or elec- 
3 tive 

1 Phys. educ. 

Elective 

15 



Hrs. 
3 

4 

A 

3 

1 
3 



SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hrs. Second Sem. Hrs. 



English Lit. 
Lang, or elec- 
tive 
Sociology 1 
Psychology 1 
Phys. educ. 
Elective 



3 

o 

3 

1 
3 

16 



English Lit. 
Lang, or elec- 
tive 
Sociology 3 
Psychology 10 
Phys. educ. 
Elective 



15 to 18 
'HIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 
Students are advised to select psychology, sociology, or zoology as a major 
subject and one other subject in this group as a minor. If possible the student 
should select the school of nursing which she proposes to enter and use her 
electives in meeting pre-professional requirements or recommendations of that 
particular school. 



The Col] k.k of Arts and Sciences 127 



(B) Pre-Professional Social Work 

An undergraduate pre-professional social-work curriculum for juniors and 
seniors is available in the Department of Social Work. 1 The purpose of this 
curriculum is primarily to prepare students for admission to the graduate pro- 
fessional program in the Department of Social Work or to other graduate 
schools of social work, and to qualify students not able to obt in graduate work 
for beginning positions in social work. 

(C) Pre-Education 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education are registered 
in the College of Arts and Sciences until they have completed 58 hours or more 
of academic work in the lower division of the College, with an honior-point 
average of 1.0. They are then transferred to the College of Education. During 
the Pre-Education period students are advised to complete as many as possible 
of the general courses required by the College of Education and for State cer- 
tification, as shown in the bulletin, Requirements Applicable to Degrees and vo 
Teacher Certification. 

In addition to the above general academic requirements students are ad- 
vised to complete as many as possible of the required academic courses in two 
teaching fields. 

Upon the successful completion of the entire 64 hours of work in the lower 
division, Pre-Education students are eligible for the Junior Certificate of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

TEACHING CERTIFICATES 

The College of Education is authorized by the Board of Governors to 
recommend all applicants for teaching certificates. 

Teaching certificates may be obtained by students registered in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences as well as in the College of Education, provided they 
meet the requirements for teaching subjects. 

For specific requirements in regard to certification see the Bulletin on 
Teacher Certification Regulations. 

Candidates for the A- B. degree who wish to qualify for teaching cer- 
tificates should indicate this fact to their adviser and plan their entire course 
with this in view. Unless this is done by the end of the freshman year, stu- 
dents may encounter difficulties in qualifying for the certificate by the time 
they receive the degree. As a check, consultation with Prof. Elizabeth M. Stal- 
naker, the adviser of Pre-Education students, should be had each semester. 

(D) Pre-Journalism Curriculum 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism are register- 
ed in the College of Arts and Sciences until they have earned at least 58 
semester hours of college credit. During the freshman and sophomore years 
they should have completed all or most courses specified for pre-journalism 
majors. 

A pre-journalism student who has not maintained at least a C average in- 
all his college subjects during his first two years is strongly advised not to en- 



1 For a detailed statement concerning the undergraduate social-work pro- 
ram see pages 171 to 1~?>. 



128 



Curriculak Requirements and Courses op [nstruction 



roll in the professional school. If his average grade in English 1 and English 2 
was less than B, he should register for English 13 during his sophomore year. 
Before or soon after entering the University a prospective journalism, student 
should master the touch system of typing, and before completing his sopho- 
more year he is urged to have learned shorthand. 

The recommended pre- journalism curriculum follows: 



FIRST 


YEAR 


SECOND 


i YEAR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


Newspaper 


Newspaper 


History 1 3 


History 2 3 


Reporting 3 


Reporting 3 


Science 4 


Science 4 


History 52 3 


History 53 3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. or 


Foreign lang. or 


Phys. educ. 1 


Introduction to 


English 5* 3 


English 4* 3 


Mil. sci. (men) 2 


U. S. Journal- 


Economics 1 3 


Economics 2 3 


Electives 1 to 3 


ism 1 


Psychology If 3 


Polit. Sci. 5 3 




Phys. educ. 1 


Mil. sci. (men) 2 


Mil. sci. (men) 2 




Mil. sci. (men) 2 


Phys. educ. 


Phys. educ. 




Elective to 2 


(women) 1 


(women) 1 






Elective st to 7 


Electives t to 4 



16 to 17 16 to 17 16 to 17 16 to 17 

(E) Arts and Law 

Three years (96 hours) in the College of Arts and Sciences, and one year (28 hours) 

in the College of Law 

A pre-legal course has two main objectives. The first is to enable the stu- 
dent to acquire a general cultural background, which is in harmony with the 
chief purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences. The second is to help the stu- 
dent to secure a more specialized background for the legal course that is to fol- 
low. 

In nearly all cases these objectives can be attained more effectively by 
taking the regular four-year Arts and Sciences course, during the last two years 
of which the student may choose his major and minor with particular reference 
to his legal work. In addition to securing the Bachelor of Arts degree, it will 
qualify him for admission to almost any law school. 

To enable students to receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Laws in a shorter period of time, a special course has been arranged by 
which the student may complete the required studies in the College of Arts and 
Sciences in three years and, after passing the entire first year of work in the 
College of Law, be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts. This course satisfies 
the entrance requirements to the College of Law but permits less freedom in 
choosing electives. All pre-legal students who did not make an average of B or 
better in English 1 and 2 are required to take English 13 and 14, two courses 



♦Majors unable to schedule English 4 and English 5 in their sophomore year 
will be required to take them in their junior year. 

tA sophomore expecting- to become a high-school teacher will choose an 
elective in his intended teaching field as a substitute for Psychology 1 and in 
his junior year will take Education 106, Educational Psychology. 

^Because of the growing demand for graduates trained for advertising pro- 
motion, circulation, and other positions in The business department of news- 
papers, sophomores are permitted to elect Jour. 110, "Newspaper Typography," 
or Jour. 113, "Principles of Advertising," or both, for the first semester if their 
schedules will permit. Because of the increasing public interest in radio jour- 
nalism, sophomores may elect Jour. 122, "Elements of Radio Journalism", provided 
their schedules will permit. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



129 



with certain sections designed especially for pre-legal students. The student 
should confer with the pre-law adviser as soon as he enters the University. The 
following schedule is suggested as being adapted to the above course: 



FIRST YEAR 


SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Botany, chemis- 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


English 1 3 


try, psychol., 


English 13 2 


English 14 2 


Botany, chemis- 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


Language 3 


Language 3 


try, psychol., 


English 2 ? 


History 52 3 


History 53 3 


geology, phys- 


geology, phy- 


Polit. Science 5 3 


Polit. Science 6 3 


ics, zoology, or 


sics, zoology, or 


Electives (lower- 


Electives 


biology 4 


biology 4 


division cours- 


Mil. sci. 2 


French, German, 


French, German, 


es should be 




or Latini 3 


or Latin 1 3 


taken in the 


' 


History 1 or 3 


History 2 or 3" 


departments in 




Humanities 1 4 


Humanities 2 4 


which the stu- 




Mil. sci. 1 


Mil. sci. 1 


dent may wish 




Phys. educ. 1 


Phys. educ. 1 


to do upper-di- 










vision work) 




15 or 16 


15 or 16 


Mil. sci. 2 




THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH 


YEAR 



Pre-law major (upper-division 
work) 12 

Pre-law minor (upper-division 
work) 9 

Electives 9 to 15 



28 hrs. in the College of Law 



32 or more hours 

(F) Curriculum for the Degrees A. B. and B. S. in Agriculture 

Students who desire a broader training than that furnished in the cur- 
riculum leading to the degree in agriculture are reminded that, by proper 
arrangement of their courses, they may obtain both degrees in five years. 
Such students will normally take the degree in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences first, usually with major work in the field of biology. Several courses 
given in the College of Agriculture and required for the degree in agricul- 
ture are accepted as regular electives in the College of Arts and Sciences; 
in addition to these the student is permitted to elect fifteen semester hours 
from courses in colleges other than the College of Arts and Sciences; these 
may all be taken in the College of Agriculture. A suggestive list of courses, 
most of which should be taken during the first four years, follows: 

Chemistry 3, 4, and 31 or 36; (a) Biology 1 and Botany 4 and Zoology 3; 
or (b) Botany 1 and 2 and Zoology 1 and 2; Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4; Economics 1 
and 2 (or Economics 1 and Agricultural Economics 2); Geology 1; Bacteriology 
141; Entomology 2 (possibly 103 or 204 in addition); Genetics 111 and 112 or 
221; Plant Pathology 103 or 201; Animal Pathology 102 (possibly 206 also); 
Animal Husbandry 2, 203; Agronomy 2 (Soils). 

Also 15 hours from the following group; more if possible: 

Poultry 1; Agronomy 1; Horticulture 1; Dairy Husbandry 1; Animal Hus- 
bandry 102. 



x Latin 1 and 2 are recommended for students not having - entrance credit of 2 
units in this subject. 



130 



Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



In many of the organizations which employ men trained in agriculture 
the broader training suggested should give the student much greater pros- 
pect of employment. He should, of course, have the necessary agricultural 
background of a certain period of residence on a farm; the student who does 
not have this will be required, as are all candidates for the degree in agri- 
culture, to satisfy the faculty of the College that he qualifies in this regard. 

The specific course requirements and the group requirements as well as 
major and minor departmental requirements in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences must be satisfied. 

(G) Curriculum in Medical Technology 

During the first two years the student is registered in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 



F 


IRST YEAR 




SEC< 


DNC 


) YEAR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


Chemistry 3 


4 


Chemistry 4 


4 


Chemistry 5 


4 


Chemistry 12 4 


Zoology 1 


4 


Zoology 2 


4 


English 3 


3 


English 4 3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Modern lang. 


3 


Modern lang. 3 


Modern lang. 


o 


Modern lang. 


3 


Physics 1 & 3 


4 


Physics 2 & 4 4 


Electives 


2 


Electives 


2 


Electives 


2 


Electives 2 


Physical educ. 


1 


Physical eduo. 


1 


Physical educ. 




Physical educ. 1 


Mil. sci. 


1 


Mil. sci. 


1 


(women) 
Mil. sci. 


1 
2 


Mil. sci. 2 



18 



18 



19 



19 



During the last two years the student is under the jurisdiction of the 
School of Medicine. 



THIRD YEAR 




FOURTH 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


Continuous < 


courses throughout 12 


Bacteriol. 220 5 


Physiol. : 


141 4 


months. Practical 


work in labor- 


Organic Chem. 


Biochem. 


139 4 


atories. 






131 4 


Parasitol. 


120 3 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Zoology 231 4 


Pathology 


151 4 


Applied 




Metabolimetry 


Electives 4 


Electives 


2 


Bacteriol. 101 


4 


.106 2 


■ 







Applied 




Microtechnique 


17 




17 


Parasitology 




107 3 








102 


2 


Normal 








Applied Serology 


Hematology 








103 


4 


108 4 








Clinical Chem. 




Special 








104 
Electrocardio- 


3 


Hematology 
109 3 








graphy 105 


2 


Keeping Records 

110 2 
Urine Analysis 

111 5 



EXTENSION COURSES 

As a part of the University Extension Service the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the College of Education from time to time have conducted at 
several centers in various parts of the State extension courses for which 
regular college credit has been given. The work given in the extension 



The College of Arts and Sciences 131 

courses corresponds in every particular, as to class requirements and credits, 
with that given in similar courses on the campus. Similar extension courses 
will be provided in other parts of the State when the facilities of the Uni- 
versity will permit. 

The giving of extension courses is subject to the following conditions: 
(1) Courses will not be organized at any place unless the demand is sufficient 
to justify it. (2) Courses offered by resident instructors will be given in 
Morgantown and in nearby places easy of access, generally on Friday after- 
noons and Saturdays. (3) Regular extension instructors will offer courses 
only in such places as can be reached from their headquarters. 

VETERANS' EDUCATION 

The Coordinated Program for Veterans of World War II 

The College of Arts and Sciences, in accepting its responsibilities to the 
men and women in the Armed Forces, has planned for veterans* a coordinated 
program which conforms in general to the recommendations of the American 
Council on Education, the Armed Forces Institute, and the West Virginia 
State Board of Education. Accordingly this program, designed to meet the 
specific needs of veterans, provides for individual guidance and for appro- 
priate educational placement based upon records of achievement, special abili- 
ties, and interests. 

Registration 

The Official Report and a record of high-school and college work, if any, 
should, if possible, be in the hands of the Registrar not less than three weeks 
before registration day. 

Advanced Standing 

In audition to credit granted for work certified by the Armed Forces In- 
stitute or by colleges, the student may, upon application to the Admissions Com- 
mittee, receive advanced standing in any course regularly offered in the Uni- 
versity for which he can pass a proficiency test. 

Special Students 

Veterans not interested in working for a degree may take any combina- 
tion of courses for which they are qualified by registering as Special Students. 

Refresher Courses 

Returning veterans will not be segregated, but will become members of 
regular classes. However, if in some cases review or preparatory courses are 
needed to enable them to enter regular classes, such courses will be offered. 

The Curriculum Committee on Veterans' Education 

To implement this program the Curriculum Committee on Veterans' 
Education, appointed by the Dean of the College, is empowered, in dealing with 
veterans, to: 



*For purposes of administration the term VETERANS refers to all former 
members of the Armed Forces — Army and Navy; WACS. WAVES, SPARS — and 
will also be construed to include former members of the Merchant Marine. 



132 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

1. Grant a maximum of 8 semester hours' credit in basic military science 
and physical education service program to those who present evidence of hav- 
ing completed successfully the basic training courses in the Armed Forces. No 
additional work in military science or physical education will be required. 

2. Allow additional credit in advanced military science and/or other 
specific subjects for training in officer or special technical schools. 

3. Accept correspondence work done with duly accredited institutions of 
higher learning cooperating with the Armed Forces Institute for the amount of 
credit allowed by the institution with which the credit was earned. 

4. Follow the regular policy of the American Council on Education in de- 
termining and recording credits for the Army specialized and Navy college- 
training programs. 

5. Grant additional credits on the basis of tests administered or supplied 
by the Armed Forces Institute. 

6. Approve courses of study, prepared by students in consultation with 
their advisers, when such courses of study require modification or elimination 
advisable, the admission of those who have not completed high school. 

of certain requirements for the degree being sought. 

7. Authorize, upon the basis of such tests as the Committee may deem 

THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
The General Introductory Courses 

The four general introductory courses, which cut across departmental 
lines, are designed to give the student a broad general education. They are 
recommended especially for those students who have not yet chosen a field of 
specialization. They will also be found useful in providing a general knowl- 
edge of subjects not covered by the student's field of major interest and in 
providing a broader perspective for later concentration in certain fields. These 
courses may be taken by any lower-division student in the College of Arts and 
Sciences or, with the consent of the dean or adviser, by students in other 
colleges or schools of the University. The courses are also open to upper- 
division students, but such students may count honor points only at the rate of 
one honor point per credit hour. 

I. THE HUMANITIES 

This course is designed to bring to the student's attention cross-sections 
of his civilization at those points where its development has been most sig- 
nificant. In accordance with this aim a substantial part of the course is its 
background of history, to which are added a survey of world literature, enough 
philosophy to acquaint the student with the principal thought patterns em- 
ployed by Western man, the main developments in art and architecture, and 
some music. 

The assigned readings constitute the most important features of the course, 
in that they supply most of the factual material. Lectures are primarily foi 
the purpose of orientation — to help the student interpret the reading. Lec- 
tures on art, architecture, and music are illustrated. Weekly discussion periods 
are also an important part of the course. In them students meet in small 
groups with an instructor, and an effort is made to help them understand the 



The College of Arts and Sciences 133 



relation of the past to present-day problems. Through the aid of a syllabus, 
the course is shown in perspective in order that it may be better conceived 
as a whole. 

1, 2. General Introductory Courses in the Humanities. 1 and II. 4 Hrs. 
per semester. Staff 

111. Symposium on Esthetics. I. 3 Hrs. 

112. The Mediaeval Synthesis. S Hrs. II. Presentation of the organic 
unity of mediaeval civilization as exemplified in literature, art, theology, 
and society. Emphasis will also be placed on the contributions of the 
Byzantine and Moslem Worlds to that unity. Illustrative material 
will include readings in the religious and secular works of the period, 
reproductions of mediaeval art and architecture and music. 

Mr. Battles, Mr. Easton, and Mr. Patton 

II. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

The Introductory Course in the Physical Sciences is intended to acquaint 
the student with the physical world in which he lives and has two main ob- 
jectives: (1) to serve as an orientation course for those students who have 
not chosen their major field of interest, and (2) to present a broad general 
view of the physical sciences to students whose interests lie on other fields. 

In its present form the course will carry four credit hours for each of 
two semesters. Two periods of each week will be devoted to formal lectures 
and desk demonstrations; one period a week will be used for discussion and 
quiz when the lecture sections will be divided into small groups; and one 
period a week will be devoted to laboratory demonstrations, museum dis- 
plays, and field trips. Motion picture films will be used in connection with 
certain phases of the course. The syllabus is designed to give a general view 
of the whole field of the physical sciences as well as serve as a guide for 
weekly lectures, readings, and discussions. 

1, 2. General Introductory Course in the Physical Sciences. I and II. 4 
Hrs. per semester. Staff 

III. THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The general course in the social sciences is designed primarily for sopho- 
mores and is intended to give the student an understanding of the society 
in which he lives, with some indication of political, social, and economic trends 
which may alter this society in the future. It is based upon a plan of two lec- 
tures and one discussion period each week. At the discussion periods the content 
of the lectures for the week will be carefully analyzed, and concrete illustra- 
tions of principles expressed in the lectures will be studied. 

For each lecture there will be certain required readings and a list of op- 
tional readings for students who desire to learn more about certain questions 
1, 2. Our Changing Social Order. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. A study 
of the most significant social, economic, and political problems facing 
the American people, as they attempt to preserve democracy in a new 
world order. The course is designed for students in home economics, agri- 
culture, engineering, physical education, music, laboratory sciences, and 
others desiring a general preparation for the responsibilities of democratic 
citizenship. 

IV. THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

1 2. General Introductory Course in the Biological Sciences. I and II. 4 
Hrs. per semester. 



134 



CurricUlab Requirements and Courses of (Instruction 



Art 

Associate Professor Patton ; Instructors 'Wilt and Aull 
The Department of Art offers technical courses in drawing, painting, and 
design; a nontechnical course in appreciation; and lecture courses in the his- 
tory of the arts. Effort is made to provide for the needs of those interested in 
the cultural aspects of the arts, to meet the requirements of students planning 
further work of a technical nature, and to enable students in Education to 
meet the requirements for certification as art teachers. 

For art majors the following lower-division program is recommended: 



FIRST YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 




First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. H 


IS. 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


English 3 3 


English 4 


3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. 


3 


Laboratory sci. 4 


Laboratory sci. 4 


Humanities 1 4 


Humanities 2 


4 


Art 11 3 


Art 12 3 


Art 113 3 


Art 114 


3 


Mil. sci. 1 


Art 30 3 


Mil. sci. 2 


Mil. sci. 


2 


Physical educ. 1 


Mil. sci. 1 


Physical educ. 1 


Physical educ. 


1 




Physical educ. 1 


Elective 2 


Elective 


2 



15 



IS 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



18 



18 



11 or 111, 12 or 112. Representation. J, II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Freehand 
drawing. Mr. Wilt 

115. Representation. I, II. 2 Hrs. Scientific drawing. Freehand 

drawing primarily for pre-medical and pre-dental students. Staff 

or 130. Appreciation of Art. I or II. 3 Hrs. Enjoyment of architec- 
ture, painting, sculpture, and the minor arts. Mr. Patton 
106. Survey of Art. 1, II. 3 Hrs. per semester. History of art from pre- 
historic times to the present. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. 

Mr. Patton 
I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Patton 

Hrs. Mr. Patton 

I, II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Painting. PR: Art 11, 
Mr. Patton and Mr. Wilt 
I, II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Painting. PR: Art 113, 
Mr. Patton and Mr. Wilt 
Representation. I or II. 2 Hrs. Figure drawing. Study of the con- 
struction of the figure. Drawing from the draped model. PR: Art 11, 12. 
or consent of instructor. Mrs. Aull 

122. Fundamentals of Design. I. II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Mr. Patton 
Lettering. I or II. 2 Hrs. Principles of design involved in lettering and 
their application. Mr. Patton 

Pictorial Structure. I or II. 1 Hr. Comprehensive study of picture 
elements. PR: Registration in painting or consent of instructor. Mr. Wilt 
Modeling. I, II. 2 Hrs. Introductory course in sculpture. PR: Con- 
sent of instructor. Mrs. Aull 
Crafts. I or II. 2 Hrs. Crafts in their relation to the art program 

Staff 



15 



30 



105, 



109. 
110. 

113, 

117, 
120. 



121, 
123. 

124. 

i26. 
127. 



Art of Renaissance. 
Modern Art. II. *3 

114. Representation. 

12. 

118. Representation. 

114. 



in the secondary school and to recreation programs. 

Biology 

Professors Strausbaugh, Spangler, Taylor, and Core; Associate Professors Am- 
mons, Anderson, and Gribble; Assistant Professor Ritchie; Instructors Davisson, 

Jones, and Lunk 

Students may select biology, botany, or zoology as their major subject. 
Biology 1 and 2 will be required of students who wish to major in either biology 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



135 



cr botany. Either Biology 1 and 2 or Zoology 1 and 2 will be required of students 
who elect to major in zoology. Combinations of general courses in biology and 
botany or zoology will not be permitted. 

Prospective majors in either botany or zoology should include in their 
schedule of lower-division work Chemistry 1 and 2. 

By permission of his adviser the student may select courses offered in 
other colleges and schools of the University, in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for a major. 

The following suggested curricula are not to be regarded as specific re- 
quirements but will serve as a guide in selection of subjects: 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE A. B. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN 

BIOLOGY 



Freshman Hrs. 

Biol. 1 and 2 8 
English 6 

Foreign lang. 6 
Gen. Intro. Cours- 
es in the Hu- 
manities 1 and 
2 8 

Physical educ. 2 
Military sci. 2 



Sophomore Hrs. 
Foreign lang. 6 
Mil. sci. 4 

Syst. Bot. 4 

Gen.- Intro. Cours- 
es in the Phy- 
sical Sciences 

1 and 2 8 
Gen. Intro. Cours- 
es in the Social 
Sciences 1 and 

2 8 
Zoology 16 2 



Junior Hrs. 


Senior 


Hrs. 


Bact. 141 4 


Biol. 291-292 


2 


Biol. 210 3 


Zool. 151 


4 


Genetics 221 3 


Biol. 218 


3 


Zool. 2*36 or 


Zool. 235 


4 


237 3 


Electives 


19 


Botany 213 3 






Biology 207 4 






Electives 12 







32 



32 



32 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE A. B. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN 

BOTANY 



Freshman Hrs. 


Sophomore Hrs. 


Junior 


Hrs. 


Senior Hrs. 


Biol. 1 and 2 8 


Foreign lang. 6 


Bot. 211, 212 




8 


Botany 221 4 


English 6 


Physics 1 and 2 6 


Botany 213 




3 


Botany 230 6 


Foreign lang. 6 


Syst. Bot. 4 


Botany 131 




4 


Botany 234 4 


Chem. 1 and 2 8 


Physics 3 and 4 2 


Biology 210 




3 


Biology 218 3 


Physical educ. 2 


Electives 10 


Genetics 221 




3 


Biol. Seminar 2 


Mil. sci. 2 


Mil. sci. 4 


Bacteriology 141 


4 


Botany 238 2 






Electives 




8 


Electives 11 



32 



32 



33 



32 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE A. B. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN 

ZOOLOGY 



Freshman H 


T8. 


Sophomore Hrs. 


Junior 


Hrs. 


Senior 


Hrs. 


Zool. 1 and 2 


or 


Foreign lang. 6 


Zoology 231 


5 


Biol. 2*91-292 


2 


Biol. 1 and 2 


8 


Mil. sci. 4 


Zoology 207 


4 


Genetics 221 


3 


English 


6 


Zool. 51-151 4 


Zoology 235 


4 


Zoology 238 


4 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Physics 1 and 2 6 


Zoology 218 


3 


Zoology 237 


3 


Chem. 1 and 2 


8 


Physics 3 and 4 2 


Biology 210 


3 


Electives 


20 


Physical educ. 


2 


Electives 10 


Zoology 236 


3 






Mil. sci. 


2 




Electives 


10 







32 



32 



32 



32 



Iu6 CURRICULAR ReQUIUE.MKXTK AND COURSES OF l.NS'l'Kl ( TI<>.\' 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
BIOLOGY 

Lower Division 

1, 2. General Biology. I and II. 4 Hrs. per semester Staff 

Upper Division 
201, 202. Teaching Materials. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Survey of de- 
vices and materials available for teaching the biological sciences. 

Mr. Core 
215. Principles of Evolution. II. 3 Hrs. Offered in 1948-49 and alternate 
years. Mr. Strausbaugh 

218. Biological Technique. II. 3 Hrs. Theory and practice of making mi- 
croscopic preparations, etc. PR: General course in biology, Zoology 2, or 
equivalent. Primarily for botany and zoology majors. Mr. Taylor 

250. History of Biology. II. 3 Hrs. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. 

Mr. Strausbaugh 
291, 292, 293, 294. Seminar. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. Staff 

BOTANY 

Lower Division 

1, 2. General Botany. I and II. 4 Hrs. per semester. Miss Amnions 

3. Dendrology. 1. 3 Hrs. Classification, identification, and distribution 
of the timber trees of the United States. PR: Biol. 2. 

Mr. Core 

4. Dendrology. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Dendrology 3. Mr. Core 

5. Elementary Botany. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Biology 1. For students in 
Agriculture. Mr. Strausbaugh and Mr. Core 

21. Plant Physiology. I. 2 Hrs. Primarily for students in Forestry. 

Mr. Strausbaugh and Mr. Ritchie 
30 or 130. Systematic Botany. II. 4 Hrs. Identification of seed plants 
and study of their classification. Mr. Core 

32. Systematic Botany. II. 2 Hrs. Primarily for students in Forestry 

Mr. Core 

Upper Division 

211, 212. Plant Morphology. I and II. 4 Hrs. per semester. Development 

and structure of plants. Mr. Spangler 

213. Plant Anatomy. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Botany 2 or equivalent. Miss Amnions 

221. Plant Physiology. I. 4 Hrs. Functions of plants. PR: General courses 
in biology or botany, and Chemistry 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Mr. Strausbaugh 

222. Advanced Plant Physiology. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Botany 221 or equiva- 
lent; also courses in general physics and organic chemistry. 

Mr. Strausbaugh 

230, 231. Advanced Systematic Botany. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. (maximum). 
Choice of work in any group of the plant kingdom. Staff 

232. Plant Ecology. I. 3 Hrs. Environmental relationships of plants. 
Offered in 1948-49 and alternate years thereafter. Mr. Core 

234. Experimental Ecology. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Biology 1 and Botany 131 or 
their equivalents. Staff 

235s. Fisld Studies in Botany. SI. 6 Hrs. Essentially physiographic ecolo- 
gy, planned for botany majors and to meet the needs of those who intend 
to teach or are teaching botany. The studies will be conducted in various 
interesting regions of the state and the entire time will be spent in the 
field. Mr. 

236. Geographic Botany. I. 3 Hrs. Study of plant groupings and world- 
wide distribution of plants. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. 

Mr. Core 



The College of Arts and Sciences 137 

238. Bryology. II. 2 Hrs. Identification of liverworts and mosses. 

Miss Amnions 

Graduate Division 

380, 381, 382, 383, 384. Research. I and II. 1 to G Hrs. Staff 

ZOOLOGY 

Lower Division 

1, 2. General Zoology. I and II. 4 Hrs. per semester. 

Mr. Taylor and Staff 
3. Elementary Zoology. II. 4 Hrs. For students in Agriculture. 

Mr. Taylor and Staff 
5 or 105 Ornithology. II. 2 Hrs. Field and laboratory studies on the 
identification, migration, protection, nesting, and food habits of birds. 

Mr. Brooks 

16 or 116. Economic Zoology. II. 2 Hrs. Ways in which animals are 

harmful or useful to man. Mr. Davisson 

51 or 151. Human Physiology. II. 4 Hrs. Mr. Anderson 

Upper Division 

207. Vertebrate Embryology. II. 4 Hrs. An introductory study of the de- 
velopment of vertebrates, based chiefly on the frog, fowl, and mammal. 
PR: General Biology or Zoology 2, or equivalent. Mr. Gribble 

220. Introduction to Human Parasitology. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Zoology 1 and 2 
or equivalent. Primarily for pre-medical students. Mr. Taylor 

230. Osteology. I. 2 Hrs. PR: General biology or Zoology 2 or equivalent. 

Mr. Gribble 

231. Comparative Anatomy. I. 5 Hrs. Organs and systems of various ver- 
tebrates, together with other facts of interest concerning these animals. 
PR: General biology or Zoology 2 or equivalent. Mr. Gribble 

232. Comparative Neuroanatomy. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. 

Mr. Gribble 

233. Advanced Comparative Anatomy. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Zoology 2 or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Gribble 

235. Invertebrate Zoology. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. 

Mr. Jones 

236. Animal Behavior. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Offered in 
1948-49 and alternate years. Mr. Taylor 

237. Animal Ecology. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Offered in 
1947-48 and alternate years. Mr. Taylor 

238. General Physiology. I. 4 Hrs. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. 

Mr. Anderson 
241, 242, 243, 244. Problems in Vertebrate Anatomy. I and II. 1 to 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Gribble 

245, 246. Problems in Invertebrate Zoology. I and II. 1 to 4 Hrs. Mr. Jones 

247, 248. Problems in Physiology. I and II. 1 to 4 Hrs. Mr. Anderson 

261s. Field Zoology. SI. 6 Hrs. Primarily for zoology majors and for those 

who teach or intend to teach zoology. This course aims to familiarize the 

students with the animal life of the state in its natural surroundings and 

includes the collection, identification, and study- of habits of the various 

forms found in this region. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Mr. Taylor 

Graduate Division 
380, 381, 382, 383, 384. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. Staff 



138 



Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



Chemistry 



Professors Clark, Hubert Hill, Dustman, Davies, Collett, and Lazzell; Associate 
Professor Gibson; Assistant Professor Hall; Instructors Hickman, Miller, and 

Popovicii 

Chemistry 1 and 2 are prerequisite to all courses in chemistry. Chemistry 
5, 6, 233, 238, 260, and 261; Mathematics* 107 and 108; minimum one year of phy- 
sics"- is required of candidates for the A. B. degree who major in chemistry. 
Mathematics through the calculus is required of majors. 

Students entering the University with the intention of studying chemistry 
as a profession leading to a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, with 
major in chemistry, should take Mathematics 3 and 4 and Chemistry 1 during 
the first semester of their first year. 

A deposit is required of all students who take laboratory courses. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree are 
essentially the same as the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with 
the major in chemistry for all non-chemical courses. The distinction lies 
mainly in the extra chemistry (elective) requirements. 



Freshman Hrs. 


Sophomore Hrs. 


Chem. 1 & 2 


8 


Chem. 5 4 


English 


6 


Chem. 6 5 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Foreign lang. 6 


Mathematics 3 


4 


Math. 5 4 


Mathematics 4 


2 


Math. 107 4 


Electives 


4 


Electives (not 


Physical ed. 


2 


chemistry) 8 


Military 


2 


Military 4 




34 


35 



Junior Hrs. 

Chem. 233 5 

Chem. 238 5 

Calculus 108 4 

Chem. electives 6 

Other electives 4 

Physics 105, 106 5 

Physics 107,108 5 



34 



Senior Hrs. 

Chem. 260 5 

Chem. 261 5 

Chem. 251, 252 

(Ind. Chem.) 6 
Other elec- 
tives 11 



33 



-hour course beyond cni 



*If mathematics is elected as a minor, an additional 
cuius (usually Differential Equations) is required. 

5 Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108 may count as a minor. If Physics 1, 2, 3 and * 
are offered, nine additional upper-division hours in physics are required to absolve 
the minor. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTIONi 



Lower Division 

Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 4 Hrs. Required of all students whose work 
calls for the first year of chemistry. Elective for others. Primarily for 
freshmen. Staff 

Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 4 Hrs. Required of all students whose work 
calls for first year of chemistry. Elective tfor others. Primarily for 
freshmen. Staff 

or 105. Qualitative Analysis. I. 2 or 4 Hrs. Required of students 
whose major is chemistry, and pharmacy students. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods. Engineering students only may take this 
course for 2 hours' credit. PR: Chemistry 1 and 2. 

Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibson 



iChemistry 1 and 2 are prerequisite to all other courses in chemistry. Three- 
year and four-year pre-medical students are referred to page 124 for outline of 
required courses. For courses in biocln mistry see page 247 and for courses in 
pharmaceutical chemistry sec page 265. A deposit is required of all students who 
take laboratory courses. 



The CoLrjEGE of Arts and Sciences 139 

6 or 106. Quantitative Analysis. II. 3 to 5 Hrs. Chemistry 5 should 

precede this course wherever possible. Required of students whose major 

is chemistry, mining engineering, and pharmacy. PR: Chemistry 1 and 2. 

Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibson 
10. Quantitative Analysis. I. 2 Hrs. Primarily for engineering students. 

PR: Chemistry 3 and 4. Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibson 

15 o r 115. Quantitative Analysis. I, II. 3 Hrs. For pre-medical and chemical 

engineering students. PR: Chemistry 2. Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibson 

31 or 131. Organic Chemistry. I. 4 Hrs. For students in (agriculture and 

home economics. PR: Chemistry 2. Mr. Dustman 

36 or 136. Organic Chemistry. II. 6 Hrs. Required of pre-medical and 

pharmacy students. PR: for pre-medical students, Chemistry 15 and 63. 

PR: for pharmacy students, Chemistry 6. Mr. Lazzell 

63 or 163. Physical Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. Required of pre-medical students. 

PR: Chemistry 2. Mr. Davis 

Upper Division 

107. Quantitative Analysis. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Chemistry 15 and 115. 

Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibson 
111. Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. I. 4 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 6 or 106. 

Mr. 

141, 143. Asssigned Topics. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. Staff 

142, 144. Assigned Topics. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. Staff 
162. The Chemistry of Colloids. II. 4 Hrs. Required of four-year pre- 
medical students. Mr. Davies 

208. Quantitative Analysis. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 6, Physics 4 or 107 and 
108, and Mathematics 5. Mr. Gibson 

212. Semi-micro qualitative Analysis. I or II. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR: Organic 
chemistry. Mr. Hill 

214. Organic Analysis. I or II. 3 Hrs. PR. Chemistry 238. Staff 

218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. For students in the College of Agriculture . 
PR: for undergraduates, Chemistry 31; for graduates, Chemistry 6 or 
15, and Chemistry 31 or 233.2' Mr. Dustman 

233. Organic Chemistry. I. 5 Hrs. Required of students who major in chem- 
istry, of students in chemical and mining engineering. PR: Chemistry 6. 

Mr. Clark and Mr. Lazzell 

238. Organic Chemistry. II. 4 or 5 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 233. 

Mr. Clark and Mr. Lazzell 

247. Stereochemistry. I. 2 Hrs. Open to seniors. PR: Chemistry 238. Staff 

251. Industrial Inorganic Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 5 and fi. 

Mr. Clark 

252. Industrial Inorganic Chemistry. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 233. 

Mr. Clark 

260. Physical Chemistry. I. 3 to 5 Hrs. Required of chemistry majors and 
chemical engineering students, the latter for 3 hours' credit. PR: Chem- 
istry 233, Physics 4 or 107 and 108, and Mathematics 108. Mr. Collett 

261. Physical Chemistry. II. 3 to 5 Hrs. Required of chemical engineering 
students and chemistry majors. PR: Chemistry 260. Mr. Collett 

274. History of Chemistry. II. 2 Hrs. Open to seniors. PR: Chemistry 6, or 
equivalent, and organic chemistry. Mr. Hill 

275. Modern Chemical Theories and Practices. I, II. 2 Hrs. per semester. 
PR: 16 hours of chemistry. Not for graduate chemistry majors. Staff 

277. Synthetic Drugs. I or II. 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 238 or equivalent. 

Mr. Lazzell 



2 Offererl in alternate years; given 1948-49. 



140 



Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



316. 

317. 
343. 

345. 

367. 

368. 

380. 

383. 

388. 

389, 

391, 

395, 



397, 



Advanced Physical Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. 
Advanced Physical Chemistry. II. 3 Hrs. 
Electrochemistry. I or II. 3 Hrs. PR: 



Graduate Division 
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 261. 

Mr. 

Modern Plastics. I or II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Staff 

Advanced Organic Chemistry. I. 4 Hrs. PR' Chemistry 238 or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Lazzell 
Theories of Organic Chemistry. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 343. 

Mr. Lazzell 
PR: Chemistry 261. 

Mr. Davies 
PR: Chemistry 367. 

Mr. Davies 
Chemistry 238 and 261. 

Mr. Collett 
Advanced Quantitative Analysis. I or II. 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 6, 238, 
261. Mr. Hill 

Valence and Molecular Structure. 1 I or II. 2 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 108, 
Physics 108, Chemistry 261. Mr. Gibson and Mr. Hall 

390. Chemical Thermodynamics." I or II. 2 Hrs. per semester. PR: 
Chemistry 261 and Mathematics 208. Mr. Gibson 

392. Journal Meeting and Seminar. I or II. 1 Hr. per semester. Re 
quired of students working for graduate degrees with major in chemistry 
Recommended as a minor for students from other departments. 

Mr. Clark and Staff 
396. Special Topics. I and II. 1 to 3 Hrs. per semester. Chemistry of 
the carbohydrates, organic nitrogen compounds, the phase rule, dyes and 
dye intermediates, food analysis, study of chemical literature as prepara- 
tion for research, chemical microscopy and crystallography, chemical 
kinetics are suggested topics. Staff 

398, 399 A, 399 B. Research. I and II. 1 to 6 Hrs. per semester. 6 Hrs. 
Required for the Master's degree. More than 6 Hrs. each semester may 
be carried by candidates for a higher degree. Staff 



'To alternate with Chemistry 389, 390. 
20ffered in alternate years; given 1948-49. 

Classics 

Professor Brouzas 

The department of classics offers courses in the Greek and Latin languages 
and in classical civilization. Courses in the department are intended not 
only to give students a thorough knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages 
and literatures but also to acquaint them with the classical culture in 
general. A student with major in Latin should plan to include at least 6 
hours of Greek in his course, preferably in the sophomore year. 

Courses suggested tor classics majors with English as a second teaching 
field for certification in West Virginia: 



FIRST YEAR 


SE 


:con[ 


) YEAR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


English 65 1 


3 


Journalism 15 1 3 


English 3 1 3 


English 4* 3 


Latin 


3 


Latin 3 


Latin (according 


Latin 3 


Greek 1 


o 


Greek 2 3 


to prepar- 


Laboratory sci. 2 4 


Sociology or 




Sociology or 


ation) 3 


Physical educ. 1 


economics 


9 


economics 3 


Laboratory sci. 2 4 


Elective 2 


Physical educ. 1 


Speech 1 3 


Physical educ. 1 




Elective 


3 


Elective 2 


Elective 2 











16 



16 



in 



17 



The College of Arts and Sciences 141 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

LATIN 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Latin. I. 3 Hrs. Elements of the Latin language. Com- 
pletion of a standard beginner's book. 

2. Elementary Latin. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Latin 1, consisting of study 
of a standard second-year book. 

3. Intermediate Latin. I. 3 Hrs. Selections from Caesar, Aulus Gellius, Nepos, 
and from other authors of comparable ease, designed to prepare students 
to read orations of Cicero and other Latin of similar difficulty. PR: 
Latin 2 or two units of high-school Latin. 

4. Cicero's Orations. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Latin 3, or 2 units of high-school 
Latin. 

5. Latin for Law Students: Selections from Legal Latin and the Institutes 
of Justinian. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Latin 3 or 2 units of high-school Latin. 

6. Vergil's Aeneid. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Latin 4 or 3 units of high-school Latin. 
12. Selections from Roman Prose. I. 3 Hrs. Cato to the end of the Silver 

Latin period. PR: Latin 4 and 6. 
14. Roman Comedy. I. 3 Hrs. Plautus, Captivi, or Menaechmi; Terence, 
Adelphoe, or Andria. PR: Latin 4 and 6, or 4 units of high-school Latin. 

21. Roman Letter-writing. II. 3 Hrs. Selections from the letters of Cicero, 
Pliny, Marcus Aurelius, and Fronto. PR: Latin 4 and 6 or 4 units of high- 
school Latin. 

22. Selections from Roman Poetry. I. 3 Hrs. Selections from the elegiac, 
lyric, and iambic poets and from Martial's epigrams. PR: Latin 4 and 
6 or equivalent. 

23. Livy and Cicero. II. 3 Hrs. Selections from Livy books 21 and 22; 
Cicero's De Senectute or De Amicitia. PR: Latin 14 and 21, or equiv- 
lent. 

24. The Lyric and Bucolic Poets. II. 3 Hrs. Selections from Horace's Odes 
and Epodes; from Catullus and other poets; selections from the Bucolics 
of Vergil and Calpurnius. 

25. Latin Composition. II. 3 Hrs. A review of the principles and syntax 
of the Latin language, and practice in writing simple Latin. PR: Latin 
14 and 21, or equivalent. 

Upper Division 

130. Leadership in Classical Club. II. 2 Hrs. Materials for enriching, vivi- 
fying and making Latin concrete; Latin posters, scrap books, Latin de- 
rivatives in English and modern languages, Latin playlets, Latin mottoes, 
proverbs, mythological allusions, etc. PR: Four years of high school Latin 
or twelve hours of Latin taken in college. Offered every other year. Ap- 
proved for high-school certification in co-curricular activity. 

201. The Story and Novel. I. 3 Hrs. The story and novel from Homer to 
Apuleius. Select reading from Petronius and Apuleius. PR: Latin 12, 14, 
21, 22, or equivalent. 

202. Drama. II. 3 Hrs. The ancient drama, its origin, and development. 
Select dramas of Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. PR: Latin 12, 14, 21, 22, 
or equivalent. 

203. Roman Oratory. II. 3 Hrs. Selections from Cicero's works on oratory 
and from Quintilian. Select orations of Cicero. PR: Latin 12, 14, 21, 
and 24, or equivalent. 

227. Vulgar Latin — Prose and Verse. I. 3 Hrs. Selections from old Latin 
inscriptions and from late and mediaeval Latin writers. Lectures on the 



a Students wishing- to offer social science for certification may substitute his- 
tory for this course. 

2 Students who wish to have social studies as their second teaching field may 
elect geology for the laboratory science. 



142 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

history of the Lutin language, and the formation of the Romance lan- 
guages. PR: Latin 12, 14, 21, and 24, or equivalent. 
231. Satire. II. 3 Hrs. Horace, Satires and Epistles; selections from Juvenal 
and Persius. PR: Latin 12, 14, 21, and 22, or equivalent. 

234. History. I. 3 His. Selections from Livy, and Tacitus, Agricola, or 
Annals; Suetonius, Life of Julius or Augustus, Sallust, Catiline. PR: Latin 
12, 21, and 24, or equivalent. 

235. Epic. I. 3 Hrs. Vergil's Aeneid and the later Epic. PR: Latin 12, 22, 
and 24. or equivalent. 

236. Philosophy. II. S Hrs. Cicero's Tusculan Disputations or De Officiis; 
Seneca's Dialogues and Epistles. PR: Latin 12, 21, 22, and 24, or equivalent. 

Graduate Division 

381, 382. Seminar. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. 
383, 384. Thesis. 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION! 
Upper Division 

237. Greek and Roman Religion and Art. I. 3 Hrs. A study of the Greek 
and Roman religious ideas and myths, with particular emphasis on their 
influence upon the art and literature of the ancient and the modern world. 

239. Greek and Roman Life and Thought. I. 3 Hrs. A survey of Greek and 
Roman culture and thought as reflected in classical literature. PR: Greek 
1 and 2, Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. 

GREEK 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Greek. I. 3 Hrs. A course in the elements of the Greek 
language. Offered in 1947-48 and alternate years. 

2. Selections from Greek Literature (Prose). II. 3 Hrs. 

3. Selections from Greek Literature (Poetry). II. 3 Hrs. 

4. Selections from Hellenistic and Biblical Greek Literature. I. 3 Hrs. 

5. Selections from Medieval and Modern Greek Literature. II. 3 Hrs. 



ir Fhese courses are offered as being of cultural value to all students. They 
present a picture of a cross-section of the Greek and Roman society, life, manners, 
thoug-ht, literature, art, science, and law. The study of the influence of classical 
antiquity upon the subsequent periods prepares one for a better appreciation of 
modern civilization. Each course may be taken separately, if so desired. 

Economics and Business Administration 

Professors Tower and Dadisman; Associate Professors Roberts, Shu land, ami 
Wherry; Instructor Courrs; Lecturers Farmer and Kirscii 

GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

The program of the Department of Economics and Business Administration 
has been designed to meet the specialized needs of students who are preparing 
for careers in commerce and industry and to provide a general education for 
them as well as for that group who, after a period of graduate training, plan to 
engage in the professional practice of economics. It has been so arranged as to 
require only those courses which are fundamental to a sound business training 
while allowing the student considerable latitude in selection of electives in his 
major and minor fields as well as in other areas of study. 

While every businessman should become proficient in the technique and 
practices of his profession, it is equally important that he be fitted to assume 
the responsbilities of intelligent citizenship and the social obligations which 



The College or Arts and Sciences 143 

his position will entail. He should become thoroughly competent in his own field, 
but at the same time he should acquire a broad general culture in order better 
to understand and appreciate those enduring values upon which modern civili- 
zation rests. To accomplsh this latter objective, the student whose major field 
is economics or business is strongly urged to orient his program of study in 
such a manner that the end result will be an educated man and not merely a 
technician. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The department offers programs of training leading to either the A. B. de- 
gree with a major in economics or the B. S. degree with a major in business ad- 
ministration. Within the broad field of business administration the student may 
concentrate his preparation in the special areas of accounting, banking and 
finance, management, marketing and merchandising, real estate and insurance, 
secretarial studies, or public administration. 

A candidate for the A. B. degree with a major in economics must complete a 
minimum of 128 college hours for graduation. He must also complete a mini- 
mum of 24 upper-division hours in the Department of Economics and Business 
Administration before receiving his degree. Of this group a minimum of IS 
hours must be taken in the field of economics as distinct from business adminis- 
tration. However, in no instance will he be given undergraduate credit for more 
than 40 college hours of work in economics and business administration com- 
bined. Finally, he must complete a minimum of 9 upper-division college hours 
in another field approved by his adviser for a minor subject. 

A candidate for the B. S. degree with a major in business administration 
must complete a minimum of 132 college hours for graduation. He must also com- 
plete a minimum of 30 upper-division hours in the Department of Economics 
and Business Administration before receiving his degree. He may receive un- 
dergraduate credit for a maximum of 54 college hours taken in the department, 
and he, too, must complete a minimum of 9 upper-division college hours in 
another field approved by his adviser for a minor subject. 

Candidates for either degree must present satisfactory evidence of the 
fact that they have completed Business 3, Business Mathematics, or its equivalent, 
Economics 1 and 2, Principles of Economics, and Economics 131, Business 
Statistics. Candidates for the A.B. degree must complete Economics 132 in 
addition to the group of subjects indicated above, while candidates for the B.S. 
degree must complete additionally Business 5 and 6, Principles of Accounting, 
and Business 101, Intermediate Accounting, before graduation. 

Candidates for either degree must complete a minimum of 54 college hours 
at the upper-division level out of the total number of hours required for gradua- 
tion. 

CURRICULUM IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Lower-division Program 

The lower-division program is designed to meet certain basic requirements 
for all students who matriculate in the College of Arts and Sciences and to pro- 
vide a knowledge of fundamental subjects essential to the effective study of 
economics and business administration. Candidates for either the A. B. degree 



144 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

with a major in economics or the B. S. degree with a major in business adminis- 
tration are expected to complete the following courses or course groups during 
their first two years at the University: 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 1, 2 English 13, 14, or 16 

Foreign language Economics 1, 2 

History 1, 2, or Humanities 1, 2 Foreign language (if not already corn- 

Psychology 3, 4 pleted) 

Library Science 1 Political Science 5, 6, or History 52, 53 

Business 3 or equivalent Speech 11 

Physical education (men and women) Philosophy 4 

Military science (men) Business 5, 6 (candidates for the B. S. 

degree only) 
Physical education (women) 
Military science (men) 

THE UPPER DIVISION PROGRAM 
CURRICULUM FOR THE A. B. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN ECONOMICS 

Professor Dadisman, Adviser 
Courses in the Department Required ot Economics Majors: 

Economics 111, Money and Banking 

Economics 200, Land Economics 

Economics 238, Economic Theory 

Economics 240, Labor Relations 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 6 college hours to be selected from the following groups: 

Economics 114, 233, 241, 244, 262 

Business 133, 242, 2*51, 252 
Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

Courses outside the Department are to be selected only after consultation 
with the student's faculty adviser. Representative courses in the following de- 
partments are recommended for economics majors; English, speech, psychology 
and philosophy, sociology, mathematics, history, political science, fine arts, and 
geology. 

CURRICULUM FOR THE B. S. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Tower, Advisei 

Courses in the Department Required of Public-administration Majors: 

Economics 238, Economic Theory 

Economics 262, Public Finance 

Business 245, Personnel Management 

Business 208, Municipal Accounting 

Business 251, 252, Business and the State 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 8 college hours to be selected from the following groups: 

Economics 111, 114, 132, 200, 233, 240 v 244 

Business 133, 141, 142, 181, 242 
Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

Students majoring in this field should plan to do their minor work in po- 
litical science. Additional courses in history and law and a good groundwork in 
philosophy are also important elements in the training of those who plan to 
enter the public service. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 145 

BANKING AND FINANCE 

, Adviser 

Courses in the Department Required of Banking and Finance Majors: 

Economics 111, Money and Banking 

Economics 114, Corporation Finance 

Economics 23S, Economic Theory 

Economics 201, Real Estate 

Business 133, General Insurance 

Business 156, Banking 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 6 college hours to be selected from the following groups: 

Economics 132, 200, 241, 244 

Business 108, 127, 130, 141, 142, 181, 204, 224, 257. 270 
Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

See recommendations under Economics Major. Courses in English, speech, 
and psychology will be particularly helpful to students who are planning 
careers in banking or finance. 

MANAGEMENT 

Associate Professor Shilland, Adviser 

Courses in the Department Required of Management Majors: 

Economics 240, Labor Relations 

Economics 237, Trade Unionism, or Economics 239, Collective Bargaining 

and Labor Legislation 

Business 181, Business Management 

Business 245, Personnel Management 

Business 203, Cost Accounting 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 10 college hours to be selected from the following groups : 

Economics 114, 132, 201, 241, 244, 262 

Business 121, 127, 130, 133, 141, 142, 206, 224, 226, 257, 270 
Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

Students majoring in management should plan to do their minor work in 
psychology. For a list of other appropriate elective fields see recommendations 
under Economics Major. 

SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Instructor Coutts, Adviser 

Courses in the Department Required of Secretarial-studies Majors: 

Business 143, 144,* Typewriting 

Business 145, 146 Shorthand 

Business 147, Secretarial Training and Office Practices 

Business 141, Business Law 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 6 college hours to be selected from the following group: 

Business 121, 127, 128, 130, 133, 181, 224, 245, 257, 270 
Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

Engiish, psychology, or spee % ch are good minor subjects for students plan- 
ning to enter the secretarial field upon graduation. For a list of other appropriate 
elective fields see recommendations under Economics Major. 

MARKETING AND MERCHANDISING 

Associate Professor Roberts, Adviser 
Courses in the Department Required of Marketing and Merchandising Majors: 



♦Business 14S, Transcription, may be offered in place of Business 144, Type- 
writing-, by qualified majors. 



li(j Curricular Requirements and Courses oe Instruction 

Business 121, Principles of Marketing 

Business 122, Marketing of Manufactured Goods 

Business 125, Retailing 

Business 128, Advertising 

Business 127, Salesmanship, or Business 130, Sales Management 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 10 college hours to be selected from the following groups: 

Economics 114, 241, 244. 

Business 133, 141, 142, 224, 225, 231, 232, 242, 257, 270, 181 
Additional Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

Students planning to major in marketing and merchandising should plan to 
do their minor work in either English, psychology, or spoech. Other appro- 
priate elective fields are listed under Economics Major. 

ACCOUNTING 

Associate Professor Wherry, Adviser 

Courses in the Department Required of Accounting Majors: 

Business 102, Advanced Accounting 

Business 108, Analysis of Financial Statements 

Business 203, 204, Cost Accounting 

Business 206, Income-tax Accounting 

Business 207, Auditing 

Business 208, Municipal Accounting 

Business 212, Accounting Systems 

Business 141, 142, Business Law 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

Courses in excess of the minimum departmental requirements may be elect- 
ed from the following groups: 

Economics 111, 114, 132, 240, 262 

Business 121, 133, 181, 224, 257 
Additional Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

See elective subjects listed under Economics Major 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

, Adviser 

Courses in the Department Required of Real-estate and Insurance Majors: 

Economics 200, Land Economics 

Economics 201, Real Estate 

Business 133, General Insurance 

Business 135, Life Insurance 

Business 136, Casualty Insurance 

Business 141, 142, Business Law 
Additional Courses Recommended in the Department: 

A minimum of 5 college hours to be selected from the following groups: 

Economics 111, 114, 241, 244, 262 

Business 121, 127, 130, 224, 257, 270 
Additional Courses Recommended Outside the Department: 

Sociology, speech, or psychology are appropriate minor subjects for stu- 
dents who plan to enter the fields of real estate and insurance upon graduation. 
Other suitable elective Fubjects are listed under Economics Major. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ECONOMICS 

Lower Division 

1. Principles of Economics. I, II. 3 Hrs. Organization of economic ac- 
tivity; elementary principles of economic activity. Staff 



Tiik College of Aets and Sciences 147 

2. Principles of Economics. I, 11. 3 His. Economics 1 and 2 are pre- 
requisite to upper-division courses. Staff 
30. Fundamentals of Economics. For engineers. I. 3 Hrs. Staff 

Upper Division 

103. Economics and Accounting. I. 3 Hrs. Of primary importance to En- 
gineering students. Staff 

111. Money and Banking. I. 3 Hrs. Our system of monetary and banking ar- 
rangements, viewed in relation to functioning of the economic system as 
a whole. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Staff 

114 Corporation Finance. II. 3 Hrs. The corporate factor in present-day 
economic life with particular reference to its financial aspects. PR: Econ. 

1 and 2 or permission of instructor. Staff 

131. Business Statistics. I. 3 Hrs. Methods of collecting, presenting, analy- 
zing, and interpreting business data, with special emphasis on index num 
bers, trend fitting, seasonal corrections, and correlation. PR: Econ. 1 and 

2 and a knowledge of elementary algebra. Mr. Tower 

132. Problems in Statistics. IT. 3 Hrs. Sampling theory, complex trends, 
multiple and partial correlations; statistical research. PR: Econ. 131 and 
consent of instructor. Mr. Tower 

173. Economics of Consumption. I. 3 Hrs. Place of consumer in modern 
society; business practices and policies affecting everyday interests of 
consumer; consumer problem? and their solution. PR: Econ. 1 and 2 or 
consent of instructor. Mr. Tower 

200. Land Economics. I. 3 Hrs. A land-policies course; characteristics, 
utilization, and conservation of urban, rural, mineral, forest, and recrea- 
tional land. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Mr. Dadisman 

201. Real Estate. II, 3 Hrs. Principles and practices of the business of 
real estate. PR: Econ. 200 or consent of instructor. Mr. Dadisman 

233. Comparative Economic Systems. I. 3 Hrs. Structure and processes of 
existing economic systems throughout the world including a review of the 
basic principles of free enterprise, socialistic, communistic, and fascistic 
societies. Comprehensive analysis based on current and recent experi- 
ments in these economics. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Staff 

236. Labor Movements. II. 3 Hrs. 

237. Trade Unionism. I. 3 Hrs. Policies and attitudes of trade unions with 
reference to production involving study of a variety of practices and shop 
rules together with analysis of relationships between trades unions and 
employers. PR: Econ. 240, 1, and 2. Mr. Shilland 

238. Economic Theory. II. 3 Hrs. Intended primarily to afford training 
and experience in use of those analytical methods and techniques which 
are specially helpful in dealing with fundamental economic problems. PR: 
Econ. 1 and 2. Staff 

239. Collective Bargaining and Labor Legislation. I. 3 Hrs. Labor-man- 
agement relations in terms of recently developed movements in this field 
as covered by comprehensive surveys that present the leading issues and 
problems. Influence of government is also considered insofar as it seeks 
to regulate such labor-management relations. PR: Econ. 1, 2, and 240. 

Mr. Shilland 

240. Labor Relations. II. 3 Hrs. History of modern labor movements; an- 
alysis of economic and social problems arising from relations between 
capital, labor, and the state. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Mr. Shilland 

241. Transportation. I. 3 Hrs. Nature, history, and problems of inland trans- 
portation, with special reference to the United States. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. 

Mr. Dadisman 
244. Public Utilities. II. 2 Hrs. Development of regulation; economics of val- 
uation, rate-making, and "Federal Power Policy." PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Staff 
262. Public Finance. II. 3 Hrs. Fiscal organization and administration of 
modern governments; public expenditures; governmental revenues; prob- 
lems of public debt. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Mr. Tower 



CUBBIGULAB B 

Graduate Division 

311. Problems in Land Economics. I. 2 Hrs. PR: Bco - Mr. Dadisman 

315. Transportation Problems. I. 2 Hrs. PR: Econ. 241. Mr. Dadisman 

325. Monetary and Banking Problems. II. 2 Hrs. Individual graduate studv. 

PR: Econ. 111. Staff 

328. Problems in Corporation Finance. II 2 Hrs. Individual graduate study. 

PR: Econ. 114. Staff 

351. History of Economic Thought. I. 3 Hrs. Economic ideas in the per- 
spective of their historic development. PR: Econ. 23S Staff 

352. Advanced Economic Theory. II. 3 Hrs. Recent developments in econo- 
mic theory such as those relating to imperfect competition, monetary 
problems, and collectivist economy. PR: Econ. 2"3S. Staff 

358. Bibliography and Research. II. 2 Hrs. Research methods, sources of 
information, technique, devices, approaches, procedures, research analy- 
sis, and presentation of results. PR: Consent of instructor. Mr. Dadisman 

361. Taxation. I. 3 Hrs. Comparative study of taxes and tax systems. Par- 
ticular emphasis upon tax structures of the Federal government and the 
State of West Virginia. PR: Econ. 262 or consent of instructor. Mr. Tower 

362. Taxation Seminar. II. 2 Hrs. Selected problems in taxation involving 

considerable original research; current literature. PR: Econ. 361 or con- 
sent of instructor. Mr. Tower 
373. 374. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. per semester. Staff 
390. 391. Seminar in Economics. I. II. 2 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Lower Division 
3. Business Mathematics. I. 2 Hrs. Percentage relationship, application 
of percentage, properties of formulas, interest computations, and laws of 
equations. Staff 

5. Principles of Accounting. I. 3 Hrs. Fundamental bookkeeping proce- 
dures and preparation of financial statements. Mr. Wherry 

6. Principles of Accounting. II 3 Hrs. Interpretation of commercial and 
industrial records. Uses which may be made of accounting data in operat- 
ing business enterprises. PR: Business 5. Mr. Wherry 

7. Business Communications. II. 3 Hrs. A study of the vocabulary and 
technique of business writing as applied to various forms of research an 1 
reporting. Correct English usage in modern business forms and letters. 
PR: S hrs. of English composition. Miss Coutts 

Upper Division 

101. Intermediate Accounting. I. 3 Hrs. Valuation of accounts, working capi- 
tal, and profit-and-loss analysis, comparative statements, and source and 
application of funds. PR: Business 6. Mr. Wherry 

102. Advanced Accounting. II. 3 Hrs. As applied to partnerships, corpora- 
tions, branch offices, subsidiaries, and foreign trade. PR: Business 101. 

Mr. Wherry 
108. Analysis of Financial Statements. II. 3 Hrs. Expands use of financial 
statements beyond the accounting interpretation. Desirability of supplemen- 
tary information. Analysis of small business enterprises. Internal analysis 
of balance sheets and profit-and-loss statements. PR: Business 101. 

Mr. Wherry 
110. Accounting for Engineers. II. 2 Hrs. Of primary importance to Engin- 
eering students. PR: Economics 103. Staff 

121. Elements of Marketing. I. 3 Hrs. The economic functions of marketing, 
principles of marketing industrial and consumer goods, contemporary mar- 
keting problems. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Mr. Roberts 

122. Marketing of Manufactured Goods. II. 3 Hrs. Case method applied to 
modern problems of sales management. Particular attention to manufac- 
tured goods. PR: Business 121. Mr. Roberts 



The College of Arts and S 149 

125. Retailing. I. 3 Hrs. Retail-store organization, control, and other operat- 
ing problems and policies in present-day retail outlets. PR: Business 121 
and 122. Mr. Roberts 

127. Salesmanship. II. 2 Hrs. Essentials of creative salesmanship and art of 
selling with practical illustrations and demonstrations. Staff 

128. Advertising. II. 3 Hrs. Techniques and procedure of local and national 
advertising using the problem approach. Mr. Roberts 

133. General Insurance. I. 3 Hrs. Theory of risk and its application to in- 
surance. Principles underlying all forms of insurance — life, property, casual- 
ty, fire surety. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Mr. Wherry 

135. Life Insurance. I. 2 Hrs. Principles as they influence economic and so- 
cial life of the community, and legal regulation of insurance companies. 
PR: Business 133. Mr. Wherry 

136. Casualty Insurance. II. 2 Hrs. Nature of and reasons for existing prac- 
tices in casualty insurance. Fire, marine, liability, automobile, title, and 
credit insurance and corporate bonding. PR: Business 133. Mr. Wherry 

139. Sales Management. II. 2 Hrs. Selection, trainiig, compensating, and su- 
pervising of salesmen; sales control by means of quotas, sales budgets, 
properly balanced Bales territories, and routes; sales promotion. PR: Busi- 
ness 121 or 127. Staff 

141, 142. Business Law. I, II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Fundamentals of the law 
of contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, partnership, corporations, and 
sales as applied to business situations. Not open to students preparing for 
Law degree. Mr. Farmer 

143, 144. Typewriting. I. II. 2 Hrs. per semester. Instruction in formation of 
accurate typing habits. Miss Coutts 

145. Shorthand. I. 4 Hrs. Gregg shorthand for beginners. Miss Coutts 

146. Shorthand. II. 4 Hrs. Intensive review of fundamental principles of 
Gregg shorthand; development of accurate writing principles and ability 
to transcribe business and manuscript materials. Miss Coutts 

147. Secretarial Training and Office Practice. I. 3 Hrs. Supervised practice 
in operation of calculating, duplicating, and transcribing machines; study 
of representative filing systems, proofreading, ?.nd business forms. 

Miss Coutts 

148. Transcription, II. 2 Hrs. A course in transcription for advanced stu- 
dents cf typewriting and shorthand. Offered only during the second semes- 
ter of each year. PR: consent of the instructor. Miss Coutts 

156. Banking. I. 3 Hrs. Banking policies and practices of concern both to those 
who operate banks and to those who use their services. PR: Econ. 111. 

Staff 

181. Business Management. II. 2 Hrs. Principles of organization, system con- 
trol, standards, research, public relations, executive decisions, as applied 
to the modern business unit. PR: Econ. 1 and 2 and Business 5 and 6 or 
consent of instructor. Staff 

203, 204. Cost Accounting. I, II. 2 Hrs. per semester. Application of labor, 
material, and burden costs to the product unit under job-order or process 
costing. Standard costs. PR: Business 101. Mr. Wherry 

206. Income-tax Accounting. II. 2 Hrs. Preparation of income-tax returns 
from accounts of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. PR: Business 
101. Mr. Kirsch 

207. Auditing. I. 2 Hrs. Duties and responsibilities of auditor; methods of 
verification of balance sheet and profit-and-loss accounts; working papers 
and schedules, audit reports, and certificates. PR: Business 101, 102, 204, 
206, or consent of instructor. Mr. Kirsch 

208. Municipal Accounting. II. 3 Hrs. Principles of governmental accounting 
and fiscal administration. Accounting for funds. Revenues and ex- 
penditures. Assets and liabilities. Reporting. Federal accounting. 

Staff 



150 CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

212. Accounting Systems. II. 2 Hrs. Building accounting systems; journals 
and ledgers; types of accounting systems; account charts and manual of 
instruction; study of selected accounting systems. PR: Business 101. 

Staff 

224. Credits and Collections. II. 3 Hrs. Principles and practices of credit man- 
agement with particular attention to mercantile credit. PR: Business 
121. Mr. Roberts 

226. Industrial Purchasing. II. 3 Hrs. Corporate and governmental procure* 
ment problems facing the modern purchasing executive. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. 

Mr. Roberts 

231, 232. Marketing Research. I, II. 2 Hrs. per semester. The purpose of this 
course is to train students in the utilization of present-day marketing re- 
search techniques in the solution of practical marketing problems with 
particular reference to West Virginia. PR: Open to senior and graduate stu- 
dents of marketing and merchandising. Mr. Roberts 

242. Foreign Trade. II. 3 Hrs. Development of trade among nations, theories 
of trade, policies, physical factors, trends, barriers, adjustment of theory 
and facts. PR: Econ. 2 and consent of instructor. Mr. Dadisman 

245. Personnel Management. II. 3H rs. A study of current human relations 
in industry against the historical background of relations between employer 
and employee from which have been conceived the principles which under- 
lie the development of employer and employee interests. PR: Econ. 240. 

Mr. Shilland 

251, 252. Business and the State. I, II. 2 Hrs. per semester. Government in 
its role of adviser and umpire; analysis of governmental policies and prac- 
tices affecting business. PR: Econ. 1 and 2. Staff 

257. Problems of Small Business. I. 2 Hrs. An analysis of the specific prob- 
lem facing small businesses in our present-day American economy. A 
specialized management course designed for students who wish to prepare 
themselves for proprietorship of a small business. The treatment in this 
course is for those already in business as well as for potential owners and 
operators of a small business. PR: Open only to seniors and graduate stu- 
dents who are majors in busmess administration. Staff 

270. Public Relations. II. 2 Hrs. Molding public opinion; establishing gener- 
al prestige; developing interr.a] public relations in industry; techniques of 
public relations. PR: Open only to seniors and graduate students who 
are majors in economics or business administration. Staff 

English Language and Literature 

Professors Crocker, Draper, and Smith; Associate Professors Bishop (Adviser), 
Brawner, and Chappell; Assistant Professors Battles, Foster, Gainer, Page. 
Pettigrew, Beed, and Sa"sre; Instructors Allen, Anderson, Armstrong, Bevins, 
Blumert, Board, Broderick, Carroll, Hatfield, Maxwell, Mockler, Montgomery, 

Morc v\\ and Sturm 

To be received as a major student in the Department of English the stu- 
dent must have credit for the following lower-division courses or their equiva- 
lent: English 3, 4, 5, and 6; English 13 or some other course in advanced com- 
position — in all, 14 hours in addition to the general college requirement of 6 
hours in English composition (English 1 and 2). 

English 3 or English 4 (English 163 or English 164) is prerequisite to all 
advanced courses in English literature. 

English 5 or 6 is prerequisite to all advanced courses in American litera- 
ture. 

A major student will usually be expected to complete at least 24 hours of 
upper-division courses in English. One course each in Shakespeare, Chaucer, 



The College of Arts and Sciences 151 



History of the English Language, and Bible literature or world literature is 
normally included in this 24-hour requirement. 

The University language requirement will be the language requirement of 
the English department, i. e., 12 hours in foreign language in college or 2 units 
for entrance and 6 hours in the same language in college. 

Six hours of English history, History 133 and 134 or their equivalent, are 
also usually required of major students. 

Speech 3 or 11 is required of English majors, and a total of no less than 9 
hours altogether should be offered in journalism, library science, and speech 
(9 hours in speech, or 6 hours in any one of the three). 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts who have not taken English 
230, 231, 234, 235 or their equivalent as undergraduates must include these 
courses in their graduate program. Courses 224 and 291 are also usually required 
of all English graduate majors. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts with major in English must 
have met the undergraduate requirement of 12 hours of college work in French, 
German, or Latin. 

HONORS IN ENGLISH 

Students enrolled in the Department of English, whether major students or 
not, who maintain an honor-point average of at. least 2.0 during their junior and 
senior years and who complete at least 24 hours of upper-division work! In Eng- 
lish may qualify as honor students in English and receive a special depart- 
mental honor certificate upon graduation. For full information concerning the 
requirements for honors in English, students should consult the head of the de- 
partment. 

CERTIFICATION WITH ENGLISH AS A TEACHING FIELD 

A major in English may meet the requirements for the A.B. degree and 
also the requirements of the State Board of Education for teachers' certification, 
with English and French, English and Latin, or English and speech as teach- 
ing fields, in four years of eight semesters, provided two years of high-school 
Latin or French have been offered for entrance credit. In lieu of two entrance 
credits, additional hours of college work in the languages are required for cer- 
tification. Other combinations, such as English and social studies or English and 
physical education, sometimes require somewhat more than four years, and stu- 
dents who desire these combinations should consult the departmental adviser 
in planning their courses. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Lower Division 
1c. English Composition. I, II. 3 Hrs. Three class hours weekly. Required 
of all students who fail to pass the Freshman English placement test. 

Staff 

1. Composition and Rhetoric. I. II. 3 Hrs. Primarily for freshmen. Re- 
quired of all candidates for the Bachelor's degree in all the colleges. Not 

open to upperclassmen. Staff 

2. Composition and Rhetoric I, II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of English 1. 

Primarily for freshmen. Required of all candidates for the Bachelor's de- 
gree in all colleges. Not open to upperclassmen. Staff 

3. English Literature. I, II. 3 Hrs. Survey: study of English authors from 
Beowulf to Burns and readings from their works. PR: English 1 and 2 or a 

superior record in the Freshman English placement test. Open only to 



152 CURRICULAB REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION' 

lower-classmen. Upperclassmen may substitute English 163 for this 
course. Staff 

4. English Literature. I, II. 3 Hrs. Survey: study of English authors from Rob- 
en, Burns to tlie present and of readings from their works: PR: English 1 
and 2 or a superior record in the Freshman English placement test. Open 
only to lowerclassmen. Upperclassmen may substitute English 164 for this 
course. Staff 

5. American Literature. I, II. 3 Hrs. Survey: study of American authors 
with readings from their works to 1870. PR: English 1 and 2 or a superior 
record in the Freshman English placement test. Open to lowerclassmen. 

Upperclassmen may be admitted with the consent of instructor. 

Mr. Anderson and Miss Sayre 

6. American Literature. I. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of English 5. 

Mr. Anderson and Miss Sayre 

13. Expository Writing. I. 2 Hrs. Not open to upperclassmeii PR: English 

1 and 2. Staff 

14. Argumentative Writing. II. 2 Hrs. Not open to upperclassmen. PR: 
English 1 and 2. Mr. Anderson 

16. Descriptive and Narrative Writing. I. II. 2 Hrs. Not open to upperclass- 
men. PR: Either English 13 or a grade of at least B in English 2. 

Mrs. Reed 

Upper Division 

Credit for at least 9 hours of lower-division English is prerequisite to ad- 
mission to any upper-division courses. 

Sophomores should not register for upper-division courses without special 
permission of the head of the English department. 

Upperclassmen who have failed to obtain credit for required lower-division 
courses must make special arrangement with the head of the English depart- 
ment to make up the missing credit. 

111. The Research Paper. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Anderson 

115. Advanced Composition: Creative Writing. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: Consent of 

instructor. Mrs. Reed 

123. Continental Influences on English Literature: Renaissance. I. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Battles 

124. Continental Influences on English Literature: The Romantic Period. II. 

2 Hrs. Mr. Battles 

125. Advanced Composition. I. 2 Hrs. Designed particularly to meet the 
needs and interests of students in languages and literatures, social studies, 
and the arts. Mr. Gainer 

126. Advanced Composition. II. 2 Hrs. Technical forms of writing designed 
particularly for students in sciences. Engineering, and Agriculture. 

Mr. Gainer 

127. The American Language. II. 2 Hrs. Words and their ways in American 
speech. Mr. Chappell 

128. College Course in English Grammar. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Bishop 

138. English Literature 1660-1744. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Bishop and Mr. Crocker 

139. English Literature 1745-1798. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Bishop and Mr. Crocker 

140. Elizabethan Poetry and Prose. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Smith 

141. Literature of 17th Century. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Brawner 

142. Shakespeare. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Smith 

160. Contemporary Literature. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Smith 

161. Contemporary Literature. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of English 160. 

Mr. Smith 

163. Great Men of English Letters. I. 3 Hrs. Study of English literature 

with special reference to the life, personality, ideas, and influence of a 

number of great English authors. May be substituted for English 3 but may 

not be elected by students who already have credit for English 3. Staff 



The Coli bge of Arts and Sciences 



153 



164. 



Great Men of English Letters. II. Continuation of English 163. May be 
substituted for English 4 but may not be elected by students who already 



have credit for English 4. 
166. American Fiction. I. 3 Hrs. 
171. Folk Literature in West Virginia. I. 2 Hrs. 

games, songs, ballads, and stories of the state. 
173. Poetry. I. 2 Hrs. 
175. The Short Story. I. 2 Hrs. 
178. Study of a Literary Type: Autobiography. II. 

180. Bible Literature: Old Testament. I. 3 Hrs. 

181. Bible Literature: The Apocrypha. II. 3 Hrs. 

182. Masterpieces of World Literature. II. 3 Hrs 

Senior-Graduate Courses 



Staff 

Mr. Brawner 

Introductory course in folk 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Brawner 

Mr. Bishop 

2 Hrs. Miss Page 

Mr. Battles 

Mr. Battles 

Mr. Crocker 



Credit for English 1, 2 : and 3 or their equivalent and for at least 3 hours of 
upper-division English is prerequisite to admission to courses listed below. 



221. 
224. 
225. 
228. 
230. 
231. 
232. 
234. 
235. 
236. 
237. 
239. 
240. 
244. 
245. 
247. 
248. 
249. 
250. 
251. 
252. 
253. 
254. 
255. 
256. 
259. 
261. 

263. 
264. 
265. 
266. 
267. 
270. 
271. 
272. 
273. 
274. 
275. 

276. 
277. 



Advanced Rhetoric II. 2 Hrs. 

Literary Criticism. II. 2 Hrs. 

Recent Literary Criticism. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Advanced Grammar. I. 3 Hrs. 

History of the English Language. I. 3 Hrs. 

Old English. I. 3 Hrs. 

Beowulf. II. 3 Hrs. 

Chaucer. II. 3 Hrs. 

Shakespeare. I. 3 Hrs. 

Old English Poetry. I. 3 Hrs. 

Metrical Romances. II. 2 Hrs. 

Southern Writers. II. 2 Hrs. 

Special Topics in American Literature. I. II. 2 Hrs. 

Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I. 3 Hrs. 

Literature of the Seventeenth Century. II. 3 Hrs. 

Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 Hrs. 

Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 Hrs. 

The Romantic Movement. I. 3 Hrs. 

American Romanticism II. 3 Hrs. 

Victorian Literature. I. 3 Hrs. 

Modern English Literature. 1881-1918. I. 3 Hrs. 

Pre-Shakespearian Drama. I. 3 Hrs. 

Elizabethan Drama. II. 3 Hrs. 

Restoration and Eighteenth-century Drama. 

Modern English Drama. II. 3 Hrs. 

Dramatic Art of Shakespeare. II. 3 Hrs. 

The Technique of the Drama I. 2 Hrs. 

technique of the various types. 

Study of One Author. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Spenser. I II 2 Hrs. 

Pope. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Browning. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Milton. II. 3 Hrs. 

American Poetry. II. 3 Hrs. 

American Drama. IL 2 Hrs. 

Folk Literature. II. 3 Hrs. 

The Folktale and Allied Forms II. 3 Hrs. 

Study of Literature Type — The Lyric. I, II 

The English Novel to the Time of Scott. I. 



I. 3 His. 



Drama as a 



Mr. Gainer 

Mr. Crocker 

Mr. Foster 

Mr. Bishop 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Foster 

Miss Sayre 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Brawner 

Mr. Brawner 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Crocker 

Crocker 

Crocker 

Crocker 

Crocker 

Bishop 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



The English Novel, 1832-1918. 
The Essay. II. 3 Hrs. 



II. 



Hrs. 



literary form; 

Mr. Crocker 

Staff 

Mr. Chappell 

Mr. Bishop 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Gainer 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Gainer 

Mr. Chappell 

2 Hrs. Mr. Draper 

3 Hrs. 

Mr. Bishop and Mr. Anderson 

Mr. Bis'iop and Mr. Anderson 

Mr. Brawner 



154 



CURRICULAB REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



278. Tragedy. II. 3 Hrs. The tragic spirit in epic poetry, fiction, and drama. 

Mr. Brawner 

279. Sat're and Humor. II. 3 Hrs. The comic spirit in E iglish literature. 

Mr. Bishop 

280. The Modern Novel. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Bishop 
291. Introduction to Literary Research. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Mr. Draper 
392. Seminar. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Staff 

Geology, Mineralogy, and Geography 

Professors Fridley and Martens; Associate Professor Wells; Assistant Professor 

LUDLUM 

Each student majoring in geology is required to present credit for Geology 
266s or its equivalent . The following schedule is recommended: 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

Majors in Geology working toward the Bachelor of Science degree must 
have a minor in an allied science. 



Freshman 



Hrs. Sophomore 



Hrs. 



Foreign lang. 
English 1 and 2 
Mathematics 3 
Mathematics 4 
Chem. 1 and 2 
Mil. Sci. 1 and 2 
Phys. Educ. 1 
and 2 



Foreign lang. 
Geol. 1 and 2 
Geol. 3 and 4 
Physics 1 and 3 
Physics 2 and 4 
C.E.I 

Mil. Sci. 3 and 4 
Electives (to 
complete gen- 
eral Arts & 
Sciences re- 
quirements) 



Junior 

Geol. 105 
Geol. 161 
Geol. 184 
Geol. 204 
Chem. 105 
Chem. 106 
M. E. 20 
E. M. 106 
Electives 



Ilrz. Senior 



Ilrs. 



4 


Upper-division 


o 


courses in 


1 


geology and 


4 


engineering 


4 


including 


5 


Geol. 266s 


3 


andE. 


1 


M. 201 18 to 21 


6 


Electives 12 to 14 



32 



34 



34 



32 to 34 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY 

The requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Geology are 
essentially the same as for the Bachelor of Science degree except that the 
minor subject must he in a related suhject. and less course material in engi- 
neering is required. Only 128 hours are required lor this degree. 

SEQUENCES 

Lower Division 

Geology 1, 2, 3. and 4 give a general view of the subject. 

Geology 1 and 111 introduce rocks and minerals and their uses. 

Geology 7 and 109 or 116 and 108 is a combination for students of education. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

Lower Division 

1. Physical Geology. I, II. 3 Hrs. A scientific description of the composition 
and structure of the earth; the physical processes which change the sur- 
face of the earth. (Geology 1 must be accompanied by Geology 2 in order 
to meet the requirements for 4 hours of a laboratory science in physical 
geology.) Staff 

2. Physical Geology Laboratory. I, II. 1 Hr. Accompanies Geology 1. Staff 

3. Historical Geology. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Geol. 1. Evolution of the earth 
and its inhabitants. (Geology 3 must be accompanied by Geology 4 in order 



The College of Arts and Sciences 155 

to meet the requirements for four hours of a laboratory science in histor- 
ical geology.) Mr. Wells 
4. Historical Geology Laboratory. I, II. 1 Hr. Accompanies Geology 3. 

Mr. Wells 

105. Structural Geology. I. 3 or 4 Hrs. Shape and position of rock masses 
in the earth's crust; mechanical principles underlying the various types of 
rock deformation; indication of the economic importance of deformed rock 
structures with respect to recovery of mineral products. PR: Geol. 1 and 
3. Mr. Ludlum 

108. Natural Resources and, Geology of West Virginia. II. 3 Hrs. A sum- 
mary of the geologv of the state from a historical and economic stand- 
point. PR: Geol. 1 or 7. Staff 

111. Economic Geology: Nonmetallics. I. 3 Hrs. Occurrence, formation, and 
use of nonmetallic mineral substances, including mineral fuels, building 
materials, chemicals, etc. PR: Geol. 1 and 2. Mr. Ludlum 

112. Economic Geology: Ore Deposits. II. 3 Hrs. Mineral composition, 
geological features, and distribution of the deposits of the principal useful 
metals. PR: Geol. 1 and 2. Mr. Ludlum 

127. Map Interpretation. I. 2 Hrs. Relation of earth structure and history 
to land forms as shown on topographic maps. PR: Geol. 2 and 3. Staff 

128. Map Interpretation. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Geology 127. PR: Geol. 

2 and 3. Staff 
161. Field Geology. II. 3 Hrs. An introduction to actual field techniques 

utilized by the geologist in mapping and reporting on the geology of un- 
known regions. The Morgantown area is studied in detail. PR: Geol. 2 and 

3 or equivalent. Staff 
184. Mineralogy. I. 4 Hrs. The first one-third of the course deals with gen- 
eral principles of mineralogy and crystallography and the last two-thirds 
is a systematic description of the more important minerals. PR: One year 
each of chemistry and physics. Mr. Martens 

2C4. Invertebrate Paleontology. I. 4 Hrs. Invertebrate fossils; their biolo- 
gic classification, evolutionary development, and use in the correlation of 
strata. PR: Geol. 3. Mr. Wells 

206. Sedimentation. II. 3 or 4 Hrs. Origin of the sedimentary rocks; the 
principles involved in interpretation of ancient geography, climates, ani- 
mals and plants, i. e.. the basic foundations for stratigraphy. Emphasis up- 
on economically important sedimentary products. PR: Geol. 1 and 3. 

Mr. Ludlum 

207. Stratigraphy. II. 4 Hrs. Distribution, age, and general character of the 
geologic formations of North America and their included forms of life. 
Changing structural features of the continent are noted by use of paleo- 
geographic maps. PR: Geol 3 and 204. Mr. Wells 

208. Geomorphology. I. 3 Hrs. Study of the surface feature of the eastern 
United States. PR: Geol. 3. Mr. Fridley 

209. Geomorphology. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Geology 208. Surface features 
of the western United States. PR: Geol. 3. Mr. Fridley 

211. Geology of Coai, Oil, and Gas. Tl. 3 Hrs. Origin, geologic distribution, 
methods of exploration and exploitation, uses, and future reserves of coal, 
oil. and gas in the world, with special attention to the United States. PR: 
Geol. 3 and Chem. 106. Mr. Ludlum 

266s. Field Geology. SI. 6 Hrs. Practical experience in detailed geological 
field procedures and mapping. Living expenses are in addition to tuition 
and must be paid on or before registering. PR: Geol. 3 and 161 (or their 
equivalents). Staff 

285. Microscopic Mineralogy. II. 4 Hrs. Principles of optical mineralogy and 
practice in the use of the polarizing microscope in identification of min- 
erals. Applications to various branches of geology and related sciences 
are stressed in accordance with the interest of the individual student. PR: 
Geol. 184. Mr. Martens 



156 Ci bbiculab Requirements and Courses of [nstruction 

289. Geologic Problems. I. II. 2 to 4 His. Specialized work for advanced 
students based upon original field and laboratory work or upon outstand- 
ing contributions to the literature. Consult departmental adviser before reg- 
i tei ing. Staff 

290. Geologic Problems. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. Continuation of Geology 289. Staff 

291. 292. Seminar. I, II. 1 Hr. p Staff 

Graduate Division 

301. Micropaleontology. I. 4 Hrs. Identification of Foraminifera. Bryozoa, 
and Ostracoda with aid of the microscope. Emphasis upon classification, 
nomenclature, and use of paleontological literature. PR: Geol. 104. 

Mr. Wells 

307 Stratigraphy. II. 4 Hrs. Distribution, age and general character of the 
geologic formations of North America, and their included forms of life. 
Changing structural features of the continent are noted by use of paleo- 
geographic maps. PR: Geol. 3 and 104. Mr. Wells 

310. Advanced Economic Geology. I. 3 Hrs. Occurrence, origin, and distri- 
bution of mineral products of economic value and the practical applica- 
tion of geologic principles. PR: Geol. Ill and 112. Staff 

395, 396. Special Topics. I and II. 1 to 4 Hrs. per semester. Petrography of 
igneous rocks, sedimentary petrography, invertebrate paleontology, stra- 
tigraphy, economic geologv, and geomorphology are suggested topics. 

Staff 

397. 398. Research. I. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. Specialized work for advanced stu- 
dents based upon field or laboratory evidence and reported upon in candi- 
dacy for advanced degrees. Staff 

GEOGRAPHY 

Lower Division 

7 or 107. Introductory Geography. I. 3 Hrs. Relationship between en- 
vironment and forms of life; emphasis on physiography and climatology. 

Mr. Fridley 

12. Meteorology. I, II. 3 Hrs. The physical processes underlying observed 

weather phenomena. Mr. Fridley 

Upper Division 

109. Economic Geography. II. 3 Hrs. Regional method of treating agricul- 
tural, industrial, and commercial development of each of the various coun- 
tries of the world, and study of the environmental features which have 
contributed to the development. Mr. Fridley 

116. Geography of North America. II. 3 Hrs. The geographic sections of the 
United States and Canada and a brief survey of each of the Central Am- 
erican republics. Mr. Fridley 

Germanic Languages and Literatures 

Assistant Professors R-OESCH and Lemke 

The chief objective of the department is to enable the student to read 
thoughtful German without the aid of a dictionary. Of German 1. 2". 3. and 4, 
each is prerequisite to the next following, and the four combined are prerequi- 
site to all other courses. 

Students majoring in German are advised to base their schedules on upper- 
division courses from the following subjects, which are listed here in the order of 
their importance: German, education. English, European history. Latin, Roniaice 
languages, modern philosophy, and Greek. Those who are not planning to teach 
German may omit the courses in education, but the sequence of subjects, from 
the angle of their desirability for a major in German, remains the same. 



The Colisege of Arts and Sciences 157 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION' 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary German. T, II. :\ His. Pronunciation, syntax, reading, com- 
position. Staff 

2. Elementary Germ?n. T, II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

3. Intermediate German. I. 3 Hrs. Rapid reading of prose by modern 
authors, memorizing of poems, dictation, composition. Staff 

4. Intermediate German. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of German 3. Staff 

Upper Division 
105. The German "Novelle". I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Lemke 

107. Nineteenth Century Drama. I. 3 Hrs. Critical study of selected dra- 
mas by Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Ludwig. Miss Roesch 

108. Nineteenth Century Drama. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of German 107. 

Miss Roesch 

111. Spoken German. I. 3 Hrs. Practice in the speaking and writing of 
German. Miss Roesch 

112. Spoken German. II. 3 Hrs. PR: one year of college German or two 
years of high-school German. Miss Roesch 

121. Scientific German. I. 3 Hrs. Primarily for students in science 
courses. Mr. Lemke 

122. Scientific German. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of German 121. 

Mr. Lemke 

131. German Composition. I. 1 Hr. Practice in the writing of German. 

132. German Composition. II. 1 Hr. Practice in the writing of German. 
136. Introduction to Goethe. II. 3 Hrs. Miss Roesch 

161. Lyric Poetry (1750-1840). I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Lemke 

162. Lyric Poetry (1840-1930). II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Lemke 
t211. Middle High German. I. 1 Hr. PR: 12 hours of German from the 

upper division. Miss Roesch 

|212. Middle High German. II. 1 Hr. PR: same as for German 211, and 

including it. Miss Roesch 

241. Faust, Part I. I. 3 Hrs. Open to qualified undergraduates. 

Miss Roesch 

242. Faust, Part II. II. 3 Hrs. PR. German 241. Miss Roesch 

245. History of German Literature, 1766-1870. I. 3 Hrs. 

246. History of German Literature, 1870-1914. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of 
German 245. 

272. The Romantic Movement. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Lemke 

History 

Professors Summers, Ambler, EnniS, and Siiortridge; Associate Professors Easton 
and Keen; Instructor Barns; Lecturers Lambert and Smith 
Before graduation history majors are required to complete 18 hours in up- 
per-division courses, including History 276, introduction to historical research 
and bibliography. Six hours in political science and 6 hours in economics are also 
required in addition to the special requirements for the A. B. degree. Students 
who expect to major in history should complete the following subjects, or their 
equivalents, in their first and second years: English, 6 hours; French or Ger- 
man, 12 hours; history, 12 hours, which should include History 52 and 53 and may 
include one year's work in either Humanities or Social Sciences general courses; 
laboratory science, 8 hours; political science, 6 hours; and economics, 6 hours. In 



liGerman 1, 2, 3, and 4 each is prerequisite to the next following-, and the four 
comhined are prerequisite to all other courses with the exception of German 111, 
112, 121, and 122, for which German 1 and 2 are prerequisite. 



158 CUBRICULAK REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

planning work in history, students should consult .the department in order that 
advanced courses may be properly correlated as well as suited to individual 
needs and tastes. One lower-division "year course" or equivalent in history is 
prerequisite for a major, but prospective majors are advised to take two such 
courses or History 52 and History 53 and one year of Humanities or Social Sci- 
ences general courses. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Lower Division* 

1. European Civilization from the Fall of Rome to the Death of Louis XIV. 
I, II. 3 Hrs. For Freshmen. Mr. Easton, Mr. Ennis, and Miss Smith 

2. European Civilization from the Treaty of Utrecht to the End of World 
War II. I, II. 3 Hrs. For freshmen. Mr. Easton, Mr. Ennis and 

Miss Smith 

52. The Growth of the American Nation to -1865. I, II. 3 Hrs. Primarily 
for sophomores. Mr. Barns, Mr. Keen, Mr. Lambert, and Mr. Summers 

53. The Making of Modern America, 1865 to the Present. %, II. 3 Hrs. 
Primarily for sophomores. Mr. Barns, Mr. Keen, Mr. Lambert, and 

Mr. Summers 

Upper Division 

101. History of Ancient Times from the Stone Age to the Fall of Rome. I. 3 

Hrs. Mr. Easton 

106. Medieval Europe from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance. I. 3 Hrs. 

PR: one college course in European history. Mr. Easton 

v107. The French Revolution. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Easton 

]108. The Napoleonic Era. II. 3 Hrs. PR: History 107. Mr. Easton 

t109. Social and Cultural History of Europe in the Nineteenth Century I. 3 

Hrs. Mr. Eatosn 

1110. Social and Cultural History of Europe in the Twentieth Century. II. 3 

Hrs. Mr. Easton 

1 1 1 4. The Renaissance and the Reformation. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Easton 

133. British Civilization to 1603. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Shortridge 

134. British Civilization since 1603. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of History 133. 

Mr. Shortridge 

150. West Virginia. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ambler 

}151. American Colonial History. I or II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Barns 

164. History of Eastern Asia. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ennis 

180. American Economic History. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Barns 

181. The American Labor Movement. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Barns 
1182. History of American Agriculture. I or II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Barns 
|217. Social and Economic History of the United States. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ambler 

218. The Second World War and its Causes from the Manchurian Crisis of 1931 
to the Downfall of Germany. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Easton 

219. History of Russia from the Varangians to the Bolsheviks. I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Easton 

220. Latin-American History: The Colonial Period and the Wars of Independ- 
ence. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Keen 

221. Latin-American History: The National Period. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Keen 
1231. The British Empire. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Shortridge 
f232. Canada. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Shortridge 



J A11 first and second-year courses are offered as lower-division "year courses." 
These courses run through the year, but in no case is the first half-year a prere- 
quisite for the second half. For example, History 1 is not a prerequisite for His- 
tory 2. History 1 and History 2 make up the introductory first year in history. 
History 52 and 53 are primarily for sophomores. A freshman should not take 
more than one "year course" at a time. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



159 



,233. Stuart England. 1. 3 Hrs. 
t234. Recent Britain. II. 3 Hrs. 

241. Europe from Sedan to Versailles. I. 3 Hrs. 

242. Europe from Versailles to Nuremberg. II. 3 Hrs. 
7249. The Westward Movement to 1820. I or II. 3 Hrs. 
t254. Trans-Mississippi West. I or II. 3 Hrs. 
255. History of Education in West Virginia. I. II. 3 Hrs. 
t256. The Jacksorian Era. II. 3 Hrs. 

257. The Ante-bellum South and the War of Secession. I. 

258. Reconstruction and National Development. 1865-1898. I 



I. 



II. 



259. Recent American History. II. 3 Hrs. 

260. American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy. 1776-1898. 
History 52 or equivalent. 

261. American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy. 1898-1945. 
History 53 or equivalent. 

262. Problems of the Pacific. I. 3 Hrs. 
t263. Anglo-American Diplomatic Relations. I. 3 Hrs. 
f264. American Policy in Latin-American Relations. II. 
t265. American Constitutional Development to 1860. I. 

52 and 53 or equivalent. 
266. American Constitutional Development since 1860. II. 

tinuation of History 265. 
|271. Problems of Recent European History. I or II. 3 Hrs 
276. Introduction to Historical Research and Bibliography. 

course is prescribed in the fourth year for all history 



Mr. Shortridge 

Mr. Shortridge 

Mr. Ennis 

Mr. E 'in is 

Mr. Ambler 

Ah. Ambler 

Mr. Barns 
3 Hrs. 

Mr. Summers 
3 Hrs. 

Mr. Ambler 
Mr. Ambler 
8 Hrs. PR: 
Mr. Keen 
3 Hrs. PR: 
Mr. Keen 
Mr. Ennis 
Mr. Keen 
Mr. Keen 
PR: History 
Staff 
Hrs. Con- 
Mr. Summers 
Mr. Easton 
I, II. 3 Hrs. This 
majors. 

Mr. Summers 



3 Hrs. 
Hrs. 



Seminars* 

301. 302. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. each semester. 

303, 304. Research. I, II. 6 Hrs. each semester. 

f320. Social and Political Thought of Latin America. I or II. 

t321. Contemporary Latir: America. I or II. 3 Hrs. 

^349, 350. Problems in Local and Regional History. I. II 

semester. 
t351. American Colonial Institutions I or II. 3 Hrs. 
7360. Rise of Nationalism in Asia. I or II. 3 Hrs. 
t361. Contributions of Asia to Western Civilization. I or II. 



t378. 
t379. 

f384, 



Historians of the United States. I or II. 3 Hrs. 
Great Historians of Europe. 1 or II. 3 His. 
385. Problems in British Imperial History. I, II. 



II 



389. Problems in Revolutionary Europe. 1763-1815. I or II. 



f390. Problems in European Diplomacy. I or II. 3 Hrs. 
t391. German Ideology from Herder to Hitler. I or II. 3 



Hi 



Staff 

Staff 

3 Hrs. Mr. Keen 

Mr. Keen 

3 Hrs. each 

Mr. Ambler 

Mr. Barns 

Mr. Ennis 

3 Hrs. 

Mr. Ennis 

Staff 

Staff 

rs. each semester. 

Mr. Shortridge 

3 Hrs. 

Mr. Easton 

Mr. Easton 

s. Mr. Easton 



Home Economics 



Courses in this subject are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences and 
in the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who select home economics as 



tNot offered in 1948-49. 

1 Seminar courses are for history and social-science majors and admission 
only by permission of instructors in charge and should be by their request. 



160 Curricular Requirements and Courses of [nstri ction 

a major must complete the lower-division requirements with the following 
changes (see page 123). 

(b) Science: Chemistry, biology, physics, psychology 
(f) Electives include Home Economics 1. 2, 3, 4, 18, 33, 50 
In the upper division a minimum of 18 hours should be elected (with the 
help of the adviser) from upper-division courses in home economics. The total 
hours in home economics must not exceed 36. Further electives should be chosen 
from the biological and social sciences. 

Attention is called to the fact that students who are not interested in the 
physical and biological sciences may elect Home Economics 1, 2, 3, 4, 18, 33, 
50, 134, or 135, 138, 160, 161, and 240. 

Students who are preparing to teach home economics must meet the re- 
quirements of the State Board of Education and of the College of Education. 
The head of the Division of Home Economics in the College of Agriculture 
is also a member of the College of Education and is the adviser for students 
wishing to meet the requirements for a high school certificate to teach home 
economics. 

Library Science 

Assistant Professor Reese 
The courses in library science are designed to meet the needs of students 
preparing to qualify for State certification as teacher-librarians in the public 
schools. However, certain courses will be of particular value to all students 
iu helping them to find library materials for their class work. The courses 
"Children's Literature and Story Telling" and "Reference and Bibliography" 
are of value to all prospective teachers. 

No student should select Library Science as a major or teaching field 
unless he or she has the ability to work well with children and young people 
and is easily and quickly adapted tc new situations. Genuine enthusiasm for 
and broad knowledge of books are desirable. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Lower Division 

1. Teaching the Use of the Library. I, II. 2 Hrs. Planned to give a work- 
ing knowledge of the University Library as well as of school libraries. 
Basic reference materials are considered, together with simple bibli- 
ography making. A general course, useful to any student in the Uni- 
versity. 

Upper Division 

101. Reference and Bihiiography. I. 3 Hrs. Basic reference books, diction- 
aries, encyclopedias, indexes, year books, and other reference material 
are studied and evaluated, with practice in detailed bibliography making. 

102. Cataloguing and Classification. II. 3 Hrs. Fundamental principles of 
cataloguing and classification, with practical experience in handling all 
types of books. Problems of teacher-librarians receive special attention. 

103. Children's Literature and Story Telling. I. 3 Hrs. Study, reading, 
selection, and history of children's literature, with practice in story tell- 
ing. 

104. Book Selection. II. 2 Hrs Principles of book selection for various 
types of libraries and readers with emphasis on the reading interests and 



Not offered in 1948-49. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 161 

habits of adults. Each student is required to read representative titles 
in every field of literature. 

105. Adolescent Literature. II. 2 Hrs. Principles and methods of book 
selection for junior and senior high-school libraries and the necessary 
bibliographic tools. 

106. History of Books and Libraries. II. 3 Hrs. Survey course, including 
the development of writing, the history of writing materials, the devel- 
opment of the book from early manuscript form, history of printing, 
printers, illustrators, bindings, and libraries. 

107. Administration of School Libraries. I. 3 Hrs. Methods of planning, 
equipping and organizing a library, together with technical and 
mechanical processes involved. 

108. Library Practice. I, II. 3 Hrs. A field course designed to give the 
student experience in meeting library conditions and problems as they 
exist and arise in actual practice in school libraries. 

Mathematics 

Professors Reynolds and Turner; Associate "Professors Davis, Vehse, and 
Stewart : Assistant Professors Cole, Vest, and Cunningham ; 
Instructors Murphy, Peters, and Davis 
The requirements for the major in mathematics are 12 hours in mathematics 
beyond the calculus including courses 240, 241, and 242. 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR PROSPECTIVE MAJORS IN MATHEMATICS 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

First Semester Hrs. First Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 French or German 3 

French or German 3 Mathematics 107 (or 5) 4 

Mathematics 3 (or 2) 3 Physics 105 & 107 5 

Mathematics 4 (or 7) 3 

Military science and physical education when required. 

Second Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 2 3 French or German 3 

French or German 3 Mathematics 108 (or 107) 4 

Mathematics 5 (or 3 & 4) 4 (or 6) Physics 106 & 108 5 

Electives or requirements for teacher's certificate. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Mathematics 107 and 108 if not. previously completed. 
Mathematics 240, 241, and either 243, 244, or 245. 
Electives or requirements for teacher's certificate. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Lower Division 

2. Algebra. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: 1 unit of algebra and 1 unit of plane geom- 
etry. Staff 

3. College Algebra. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: iy 2 units of algebra or Mathematics 
2, and 1 unit of plane geometry. Staff 

4. Plane Trigonometry. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: iy 2 units of algebra and 1 unit 
of plane geometry. Staff 

5. Analytic Geometry. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: college algebra and plane trigo- 
nometry. Staff 

7. Solid Geometry. I, II. 3 Hrs. If offered to remove entrance conditions, 

V 2 unit. PR: plane geometry. Staff 

10. Plane Trigonometry. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 1 unit of algebra and 1 unit of 

plane geometry. Staff 



162 CURRIGULAR REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Upper Division 

106. Descriptive Astronomy. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Math. 5. Mr. Reynolds 

107 or 207. Differential and Integral Calculus. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: Mathe- 
matics 5. Staff 

108 or 208. Differential and Integral Calculus. I, II. 4 Hrs. Continuation of 
Mathematics 107. Staff 

128. Mathematical Theory of Investment. II. 3 Hrs. Primarily for students 
in economics and sociology. PR: Mathematics 3. Mr. Reynolds 

130. Elementary Theory of Mathematical Statistics. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Mathe- 
matics 107. Mr. Reynolds 

240. Differential Equations. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 108. Mr. Davis 

241. Theory of Determinants and Analytic Geometry of Space. I. 3 Hrs. 
PR: Mathematics 108. Miss Turner 

242. Advanced Calculus. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 108. Mr. Vehse 

243. Projective Geometry. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 241. Miss Turner 

244. Theory of Equations. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 108. Mr. Reynolds 

245. Vector Analysis. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Math. 240 and 242. Mr. Stewart 

246. Introduction to Algebraic Theory. I. 3 Hrs PR: Mathematics 108. Staff 

247. Theory of Numbers. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 5. Mr. Vehse 

248. History of Mathematics. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Math. 5. Mr. Reynolds 

249. History of Elementary Modern Mathematics. II. 2 Hrs. PR: 
Mathematics 5. Mr. Reynolds 

251, 252. Advanced Calculus. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. PR: Math- 
ematics 108. Mr. Stewart 

253, 254. Advanced Course In Applied Mathematics. I and II. 3 Hrs. per 
semester. PR: Mathematics 108. Mr. Vest 

255. Mathematical Astronomy. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Mathematics 106 and 240. 

Mr. Reynolds 

257. Fourier Series and Partial Differential Equations. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Math- 
ematics 240 and 242 or 251. Mr. Vest 

258. Operational Methods in Partial Differential Equations. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 
Mathematics 240 and 242 or 251. Mr. Vest 

360, 361. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. I and II. 3 Hrs. 

per semester. PR: Math. 240, 241, 242, and 243. Mr. Davis 

362, 363. Modern Algebra. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. PR: Mathematics 

242 and 243. Mr. Reynolds 

364, 365. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. I 

and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. PR: Mathematics 240, 242, and 243. 

Mr. Vehse 
366, 367. Higher Plane Curves. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. PR: 

Mathematics 243. Miss Turner 

370, 371. Theoretical Mechanics. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. PR: 

Mathematics 240 and Physics 232. Mr. Vehse 

372, 373. Line Complexes and Cremona Transformations. I and II. 3 Hrs. 

per semester. PR: Mathematics 243. Mr. Davis 

374, 375. Algebraic Surfaces. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. .PR: Mathe- 
matics 367. Miss Turner 
376, 377. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. I and II. 8 Hrs. per 

semester. PR: Mathematics 365. Mr. Reynolds 

390, 391. Seminar. I and II. 1 or 2 Hrs. per semester. Staff 

Philosophy and Psychology 

Professors Winter and Stalnakfr; Associate Professors Cresswell, Curtis, and 

Minor 
There is such wide diversity in the preparation, needs and aims of indi- 
vidual students that the department cannot lay down inflexible rules with 
regard to sequence of courses. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 163 

Introduction to Psychology (Psychology 1) or General Psychology (Psy- 
chology 3 and 4) is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. The 
upper-division courses are arranged in the order best suited to a progressive 
development in the fields of psychology and philosophy respectively. 

Majors. Students who desire to do their major work in this department 
should consult with the head of the department before making their decision. 

There are various fields of work open to those who major in either 
philosophy or psychology, some of which are as follows: 
Psychology Majors: 

1. Teaching psychology in university, college, or normal school. 

2. Clinical work in public schools, hospitals, or social service. 

3. Vocational guidance. 

4. Personnel work in industry. 

5. Preparation for certain phases of psychiatry. 

6. Consulting psychologist. 
Philosophy Majors: 

1. Teaching philosophy in university, college, seminary, or normal 
school. 

2. The ministry. 

3. General culture for those not planning to undertake a specific type 
of work. 

A major includes at least 24 hours of upper-division work in the depart- 
ment. Students may major in either philosophy or psychology. Students 
majoring in either of these branches will include at least one course in the 
other. 

The sequence of courses for each major will be arranged so as to give 
the student the best foundation for the type of work he wishes to pursue. 

Related Courses: Various departments offer courses of special value to 
students of philosophy and psychology. Following is a list of these courses: 

For students in psychology: zoology; physiology; neurology; genetics; 
sociology; education; political science; and economics. 

For students in philosophy: classical civilization (Greek life and thought); 
ancient or medieval history, or both; sociology; at least 12 hours in one of 
the sciences, or mathematics. 

Students whose work shows a marked deficiency in English will be re- 
quired to take a course in advanced composition. • 

Majors who look forward to teaching philosophy or psychology should plan 
to secure at least a Master's degree before applying for a teaching position. 

Students who expect to continue their study of philosophy or psychology 
in a graduate school, either here or elsewhere, are advised to take at least 
12 hours of both German and French. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PSYCHOLOGY 
Lower Division 
1. Introduction to Psychology. I, II. 3 Hrs. Not open to freshmen. This 
course is designed to familiarize the student wth the principal phe- 
nomena of mental life, and is prerequisite to all other courses in psy- 
chology and philosophy except for those who take Psychologv 3 and 4. 

Mr. Winter and Miss Stalnaker 

3. General Psychology. I. 4 Hrs. Open to freshmen. Three hours of 

lecture and quiz and two hours of laboratory per week. Mr. Curtis 

and Staff 



164 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

4. General Psychology. II. 4 Hrs. PR: Psychology 3. Continuation of Psy- 
chology 3. Mr. Curtis and Staff 
110. Applied Psychology. IT. 3 Hrs. A study of the application of psychology 
to medicine and law. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). Mr. Winter 

Upper Division 

115. Psychology of Management. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or Psychology 
3 and 4). Mr. Curtis 

116. Social Psychology. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). Mr. Winter 
122. Child Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). 

Miss Stalnaker 
125. Mental Hygiene. I, 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). 

Miss Stalnaker 

132. Psychology of Advertising and Industry. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 

(or 3 and 4). Mr. Curtis 

219. Clinical Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), 122, and 

224. Miss Stalnaker 

224. Mental Measurement. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). 

Miss Stalnaker 

226. Advanced Experimental Psychology. I. 2 Hrs. Students in this course 

will be given individual problems for experimentation. PR: Psychology 

3, 4, and 224. Mr. Curtis 

228. Personnel Psychology. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), 219, 
and 224. Miss Stalnaker 

229. Abnormal Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), and 
116. Miss Stalnaker 

230. Advanced Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), and 
one course in philosophy. Mr. Winter 

234. Problems in Child Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. Students in this course will be 
assigned individual problems in child behavior. PR: Psychology 1 (or 
3 and 4), and 122. Miss Stalnaker 

240. History of Psychology. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), and 
two courses in philosophy. Mr. Winter 

245. Seminar. I. 2 Hrs. A critical study of the current literature of psy- 
chology. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4) and 116. Mr. Winter 

301, 302. Special Problems in Psychological Research. I and II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Staff 

PHILOSOPHY 

Lower Division 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). 

Staff 
11. Ethics. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4). Mr. Minor 

Upper Division 

106. Logic. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), Philosophy 4. 

Mr. Oresswell 

112. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psycholo- 
gy 1 (or 3 and 4), and Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell 

113. History of Modern Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Philosophy 
112, ending with German Idealism. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), and 
Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell 

114. Contemporary Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), 
Philosophy 4 and 3 hours in another philosophy course. Mr. Minor 

120. The Philosophy of Plato. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), 
Philosophy 4 and 3 hours in another philosophy course, preferably Phi- 
losophy 112. Mr. Cresswell 



The College op Arts and Sciences 165 

208. Philosophy of Religion. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), Phi- 
losophy 4 and 3 hours in another philosophy course. Mr. Minor 

£12. Seminar in Medieval Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. Medieval culture with 
particular reference to Thomas Aquinas. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), 
Philosophy 4, 112, 113, and 106. Mr. Cresswell 

216. Contemporary Political Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 
(or 3 and 4), and Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell 

217. Seminar in Metaphysics. I. 2 Hrs. Critical study of a selected system 
of thought. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), Philosophy 4, 112, 113, and 
106. Mr. Cresswell 

218. Aesthetics. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Psychology 1 (or 3 and 4), Philosophy 4, 
and 3 hours in another philosophy course. Mr. Minor 

Physics 

Professors Colwell, Molby, and Ford; Associate Professor Thomas; Instructors 

Bryan and Baii.ey 

The various courses offered in physics are designed to meet the needs 
ot the students in the College of Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, and Engineer- 
ing, the School of Music, and the School of Medicine. All the courses are 
divided into lower and upper divisions. Majors in physics or mathematics will 
choose courses from the upper group at the beginning of the third year. 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR PHYSICS MAJORS 

FIRST YEAR — English, algebra, trigonometry, introductory physics, 
French, analytical geometry, some required subjects. 

SECOND YEAR — calculus, problems in physics, German, general physical 
laboratory or chemistry (or radio or photography), spee6h, some required 
subjects. 

THIRD YEAR — light, electrical measurements, advanced radio, differential 
equations, German, some required subjects. 

FOURTH YEAR— modern electrical theory or electricity and magnetism, 
theoretical mechanics, vector analysis, intermediate physical laboratory- 
Lower Division 

1. Introductory Physics. 1. 3 Hrs. Primarily for freshmen. Required of 
all agricultural students and all students in the School of Medicine. 
Must be accompanied by Physics 3. Takes up mechanics, sound, and 
heat. PR: plane geometry and algebra. . Mr. Colwell and Mr. Thomas 

2. Introductory Physics. II. 3 Hrs. Primarily for freshmen. Must be ac- 
companied by Physics 4. Includes electricity, magnetism, and light. 
PR: Physics 1. Mr. Colwell and Mr. Thomas 

3. 4. Introductory Physical Laboratory. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. 
Primarily for freshmen. Accompanies and is required of all students 
who take Physics 1 and 2. Mr. Molby and Staff 

17. General Laboratory. I, II. 2 Hrs. Primarily for sophomores and juniors. 
This course is designed to meet the needs of students who desire more 
laboratory work than that offered in Physics 3 and 4. PR: Physics 
3 and 4. Mr. Molby 

Upper Division 

105. General Physics. I, II. 4 Hrs. Required of all candidates for engineering 
degrees and recommended for all students who major in mathematics. 
Not open to students who have credit for Physics 1. Physics 107 must 
accompany. Comprises mechanics, sound, and heat. PR: trigonometry 

and analytical geometry. Mr. Ford and Mr. Thomas 



166 Ci BBicuLAR Requirements And Courses of Instruction 

105A. General Physics. II. 4 Hrs. A repeat course for those who have failed 
in Physics 105. 

106. General Physics. II. 4 Hrs. Continuation of Physics 105. Not open to 
students who have credit in Physics 1 and 2. Covers light, electricity, and 
magnetism. Physics 108 must accompany. Mr. Ford and Mr. Thomas 

107, 108. General Physics Laboratory. 1 and II. 1 Hr. per semester. A com- 
panion course for Physics 105 and 106. Mr. Molhy and Staff 

109, 110. A Problem Course in General Physics. I and II. 2 Hrs. per semester. 
Open to students who have taken Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or equivalent; not 
open to students who have taken Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108. 

Mr. Thomas 

113, 114. Introductory Radio. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or 
equivalent. Mr. Thomas 

116, 216. Photography. II. 3 Hrs. For science majors. Mr. Molby 

221. Light. I. 3 Hrs. Lectures and laboratory work, designed to meet the 
needs of students in general biology, chemistry, and medicine. Graduate 
credit will be allowed to those who are not majoring in Physies. PR: 
Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, and trigonometry, or Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108. 

Mr. Molby 

225, 226. Introduction to Modern Physics. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. 
Especially for students majoring in the natural sciences. Open to all 
seniors. PR: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or 105, 106, 107, and 108, and Mathe- 
matics 3 and 4, or equivalent. Mr. Ford 

231, 232. Theoretical Mechanics. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Open to 
seniors. PR: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or 105, 106, 107, and 108, and integral 
calculus. Mr. Colwell 

233, 234. Introductory Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 Hrs. Open to 
seniors. PR: Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108, and integral calculus. 

Mr. Thomas 

241, 243, 245, 247. Physics Seminar. I. 1 Hr. Open to seniors and grad- 
uates. Discussion of modern research in Physics. Mr. Colwell 

242, 244, 246, 248. Physics Seminar. II. 1 Hr. Similar to Physics 241. 

Mr. Colwell 

249, 250. Intermediate Laboratory and Special Topics. I and II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

per semester. Open to seniors who major in physics. PR: Physics 105, 

106, 107, and 108, and calculus. Mr. Colwell and Mr. Ford 

261. Matter and Its Constituents. I, II. 2 Hrs. per semester. Mr. Colwell 

Graduate Division 

381, 382. Physical Optics. I, II. 3 Hrs. each semester. Mr. Molby 

383, 384. The Kinetic Theory of Gases and Molecular Physics. I, II. 3 Hrs. 
PR: Physics 1. 2. 3, and 4, or Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108, and integral 
calculus. Mr. Thomas 

385, 386. Quantum Mechanics. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. Mr. Thomas 
387. 388. The Differential Equations of Physics, I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. 

Mr. Thomas 
391, 392. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. I and II. 3 Hrs. per semester. 

Mr. Colwell 
397, 398. Research. I and II. 4 to 6 Hrs. per semester. Mr. Colwell and Staff 

Political Science 

Professor Frasure; Associate Professor Sturm; Instructors Ross, White, and Mann 
Students who expect to select political science as their major subject 
should, while in the lower division, receive credit for Political Science 5 and 6 
(106), History 1. 2. 52, 53. and Economics 1 and 2 or Sociology 1. Humanities 1, 2, 
may be substituted for History 1. 2. Political Science 5 and 6 (106) constitute the 
basic work in this department and they, or their equivalent, are prerequisite to 



The College op Arts and Sciences 



167 



all courses in the upper division. The major requirement is 18 hours in upper- 
division courses. There should be a first minor of 12 hours in upper-division 
courses in history or economics and a second minor of 6 hours in upper-division 
courses in the other subject. With the approval of the departmental adviser, 
part of the required work in the major may be taken in the College of Law. 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR POLITICAL-SCIENCE MAJORS 



Fl 


IRST YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs, 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs, 


English 1 


3 


English 2 3 


Political Sci. 5 3 


Political Sci. 6 3 


Science 


4 


Science 4 


French or 


French or 


French or 




French or 


German 3 


German 3 


German 


3 


German 3 


History 52 3 


History 53 3 


History 1 or 


3 


History 2 or 3 


Economics 1 3 


Economics 2 3 


Humanities 1 


4 


Humanities 2 4 


Psychology 1 or 


Philosophy 4 3 


Mil. sci. 


1 


Mil. sci. 1 


Sociology 1 3 


Mil. sci. or 2 


Physical educ. 


1 


Physical educ. 1 


Mil. sci. or 2 

Physical educ. 1 

Elective 2 


Physical educ. 1 
Elective 2 


14 to 


16 


14 to 16 


18 to 19 


18 to 19 



104. 
107. 
200. 
202. 
207. 
208. 

209. 
210. 
213. 
216. 
219. 

220. 

221. 
222. 
223. 
260. 

261. 



301. 
302. 
303. 
304. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION^ 
Lower Division 2 
The Principles and Practices of Government: The American Federal Sys- 
tem. I, II. 3 Hrs. Primarily for sophomores. Staff 
(106). American State and Local Government. I, II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

Upper Division 

Contemporary European Political Institutions. I. 3 Hrs. 

American City Government. II. 3 Hrs. 

American Political Institutions. I. 3 Hrs. 

Political Parties and Public Opinion. I. 3 Hrs. 

The Administrative Process. I. 3 Hrs. 

The Administrative Process. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation 



The Legislative Process. I. 3 Hrs. 

British Government and Practical Politics. II. '■'> Hrs. 

Modern Dictatorships. I. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Comparative Political Institutions. II. 3 Hrs. 

History of Political Thought: Plato to Machiavelli. I. 3 

of majors. 

History of Political Thought: Machiavelli to the Present. 

Required of majors. 

Recent and Contemporary Political Thought. II. 3 Hrs. 

American Constitutional Principles. II. 3 Hrs. 

International Law. I. 3 Hrs. 

International Relations. I. 3 Hrs. 

International Relations. II. 3 Hrs. (Continuation of : 260. ) 

Graduate Division 

Methods of Research in Political Science. I. 
Methods of Research in Political Science. II. 
Selected Problems in International Relations. 



Mr. Ross 

Mr. Sturm 

Mr. Sturm 

Mr. Ross 

Mr. Sturm 

of Course 201. 

Mr. Sturm 

Mr. Sturm 

Mr. Frasure 

Mr. Frasure 

Mr. Frasure 

Hrs. Required 

Mr. Sturm 

II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Sturm 

Mr. Sturm 

Mr. White 

Mr. White 

Mr. Frasure 

Mr. Frasure 



2 to 4 Hrs. 

2 to 4 Hrs. 

I. 2 to 4 Hrs. 



Mr. Frasure 
Mr. Frasure 
Mr. Frasure 



Selected Problems in International Relations. II. 2 to 4 Hrs. Mr. Frasure 



iRegular elective for Arts and Science students. 

2 These courses are prerequisite to all upper-division work in the department 



168 Ci rriculab Requirements and Courses of [nstruction 

307. Selected Problems in State and Local Government. I. 2-4 Hrs. 

Mr. Sturm 

308. Selected Problems in State and Ltocal Government. II. 2-4 Hrs. 

Mr. Sturm 

309. Selected Problems in Public Administration. I. 2-4 Hrs. Mr. Sturm 

310. Selected Problems in Public Administration. II. 2-4 Hrs. Mr. Sturm 
360. Thesis. I and II. 2 to 4 Hrs Mr. Frasure and Mr. Sturm 

Romance Languages and Literatures 

Professors Stathers, Darby, and Spiker; Associate Professors Mitrani, Ashburn, 
and Manning; Assistant Professor McBride; Instructors SlNGER, Wade, and Herreka 

Courses 1 and 2 or two years of high-school credit will he required for en- 
trance to courses 5, 6, 103, 104, 107, and 108. Usually students who have had two 
years' study of the language in high school should take courses 5 and 6. Stu- 
dents who have done three years of work in high school should take courses 
107 and 108. 

Prospective major students, and students who expect to do more advanced 
work in language, should not take more than 6 hours in courses 5, 6, 7, and 8. 

Students whose grades have consistently fallen below B in language work 
in the lower division should not select Romance languages as a major subject. 

No student who has not completed French 109, 110, 115, 116, and 231 or 
Spanish 109, 110, 211, 212, 221, and 222 will be recommended as a teacher of 
these subjects. 

In order to be recommended by this Department for the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts a student must have completed, in addition to special requirements for 
the A. B. degree, one of the following combinations: 

PROGRAM FOR MAJOR STUDENTS 

NOTE: Credit hours are shown in parentheses after course designations. 

FRENCH: French 109, 110, 115, 116, 221, and 222 (3 each); 231 (2); Spanish 
(6 to 12). 

SPANISH: Spanish 109, 110, 211, 212, 221, and 222 (3 each); French (9 to 
12). 

SUGGESTED DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

Hrs. Hrs. 

One Romance language 6 Two Romance languages (6 hrs 

English 1 and 2 6 each) 12 

Laboratory science 8 Military science (when required) 2 

Military science (when required) 2 Electives and lower-division prepara- 

Electives 8 to 10 ation for minor subjects. 18 to 20 



32 32 

THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR 

Hrs. Hrs. 

French or Spanish 109 and 110 French or Spanish 221 and 222 6 

(if not completed in second year) 6 French 231 or elective in Spanish 2 

French 115 and 116 or Spanish 211 Minor subject and electives 24 

and 212 6 

Minor subject and electives 20 

32 32 



The College of Arts and Sciences 169 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FRENCH 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary French. I, II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

2. Intermediate French. I, II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

5. Contemporary Fiction. I. 3 Hrs. Staff 

6. Contemorary Drama. II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

Upper Division 

103. Elementary Conversation. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 6 hours of French, or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Stathers 

104. La Langue Pratique. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 6 hours of French, or equivalent. 

Mr. Stathers 

107. Advanced Readings. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Mitrani 

108. Advanced Readings. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Mitrani 

109. Grammar and Pronunciation. I. 3 Hrs. For sophomores or juniors. 
PR: 12 hours of French, or equivalent. Staff 

110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 Hrs. For sophomores or juniors. PR: 
French 109 or equivalent. Staff 

115. The Classical School. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of French, or equivalent. 

Mr. Darby and Mr. Spiker 

116. The Classical School After Moliere. II. 3 Hrs. PR: French 115. 

Mr. Darby and Mr. Spiker 
217. Civilisation Francaise. I. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. Mr. Spiker 

221. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 Hrs. PR: French 115. Mr. Stathers 

222. French Literature Since 1850. II. 3 Hrs. PR: French 221. Mr. Stathers 

223. The Problem Play. I. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116 Mr. Darby 

224. Historical Novel in the Nineteenth Century. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115. 
and 116. Mr. Darby 

1226. Literary Criticism in the Nineteenth Century. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 

221 and 22*2. Mr. Spiker 

1229. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. 

Mr. Spiker 
i230. The Sixteenth Century After 1550. II 2 Hrs. PR French 115 and 116. 

Mr. Spiker 
231. Phonetics and Pronunciation. II. 2 Hrs. PR: 18 hours of French, or 
equivalent. Mr. Stathers 

237. Moliere. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. Mr. Spiker 

t243. Etude du vocabulaire. I. 2 Hrs. PR. French 109 and 110. Mr. Stathers 
f244. Explication de textes. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 109 and 110. Mr. Stathers 
|275. Theatre of Eighteenth Century. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. 

Mr. Darby 
|276. Voltaire. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. Mr. Darby 

1281. Topic in Romantic Period. I. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. 

Mr. Stathers 
t282. Topic in Contemporary Period. II. 2 Hrs. PR: French 115 and 116. 

Mr. Stathers 

Graduate Division 

391. Seminar. I. 2 to 5 Hrs. The origin of French comedy relative to native 
and foreign elements in its composition. Mr. Spiker 

392. Seminar. II. 2 to 5 Hrs. The development of the theory of tragedy 
before the seventeenth century. Mr. Spiker 

395. Seminar. I. 2 to 5 Hrs. Individual study of some subject chosen from 
the literature of the first half of the nineteenth century. Mr. Stathers 

396. Seminar. II. 2 to 5 Hrs. A critical study of some phase of literature 
of the second half of the nineteenth century. Mr. Stathers 



170 Cuericulae Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

SPANISH 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Spanish. I, II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

2. Intermediate Spanish. I, II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Spanish 1. Staff 

5. Contemporary Fiction. I. 3 Hrs. Staff 

6. Contemporary Drama. II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

Upper Division 

103. Elementary Conversation. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 6 hours of Spanish, or equiva- 
lent. Staff 

104. La Lengua Practica. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 6 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Staff 

109. Grammar and Conversation. I. 3 Hrs. For sophomores or juniors. 

Mr. Ashburn 

110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Spanish 109, or equivalent. 

Mr. Ashburn 
1115 Lyric Poetry. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Mr. Ashburn 
f116. Civilization and Culture. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of Spanish or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Ashburn 

211. Nineteenth Century Literature to 1870. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of 
Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Ashburn 

212. Spanish Literature Since 1870. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of Spanish, or 
equivalent. Mr. Ashburn 

217. Spanish American Literature and Culture. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of 
Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani 

218. Spanish American Literature and Cu!ture. II. 3 His. Continuation of 
Course 217. PR: 12 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani 

221. Literature of the Golden Age. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 18 hours of Spanish, or 
equivalent. Mr. Mitrani 

222. The Golden Age after Lope de Vega. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Spanish 221. 

Mr. Mitrani 

223. Estudios de Estilo. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 18 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Mr. Ashburn 

224. Explication de Textos. II. 3 Hrs. PR: 18 hours of Spanish, or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Ashburn 

Graduate Division 

391. Cervantes. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Singer 

392. Special Topics. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Themes in Spanish literature and 
culture. Mr. Singer 

395. Sixteenth Century Literature. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ashburn 

396. Old Spanish. IT. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ashburn 

ITALIAN 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Italian. I. 3 Hrs. Staff 

2. Intermediate Italian. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Italian 1. Staff 

5. Contemporary Readings. I. 3 Hrs Staff 

6. Advanced Readings. II. 3 Hrs. Staff 

Upper Division 
f109. Composition and Conversation. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Darby 

1110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Darby 



tOmitted, 1948-49. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 171 

f115. Italian Literature. 1. 3 Hrs. General survey Mr. Darby 

i 116. Italian Literature. II. ."> Hrs. Continuation of course 115. Mr. Darby 
; 2 1 1 . One Italian Author. I. 3 Hrs. PR: 12 hours of Italian, or equivalent. 

Mr. Darby 
1212. Dante. II. :: Hrs. PR: 12 hours of Italian, or equivalent. Mr. Darby 

PORTUGUESE 

Lower Division 

fl. Elementary Portuguese. I. ?» Hrs. Staff 

t2. Intermediate Portuguese. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Portuguese 1. 

Staff 

RUSSIAN 

Instructor Kobzarfif 



1. 

2. 

3. 
4. 


Elementary Russian. 
Elementary Russian. 
Intermediate Russian. 
Intermediate Russian. 


I. 3 Hrs. 

II. 3 Hrs. 

I. 3 Hrs. 

II. 3. Hrs. 

Social Work 



Professor Sfxlfy ; Assistant Professors Hoffman and Fulton; Lecturers Gerchow, 
Helmick, Johnson, Layman, Thomas, and Pickett 

PURPOSE 

The Department of Social Work provides a professional curriculum for 
the preparation of competent young men and women to meet the ever-increas- 
ing demand for personnel in both public and private social-work agencies. So- 
cial work deals with human relationships; its objective is that of helping per- 
sons to achieve; more satisfying lives both as individuals and as members of soci- 
al groups. Therefore it is the aim of this department, through carefully selected 
courses and faculty supervision of all field work, to aid students to acquire 
a broad theoretical and practical knowledge, including a historical perspective, 
of the different areas of social work. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Department of Social Work is a member of the American Association 
of Schools of Social Work (the national accrediting body for professional 
schools of social work) and offers, on a graduate level, a one-year social 
work curriculum (30 semester hours of work) which leads to a professional 
Certificate of Social Work. In addition, the department makes available a 
pre-professional curriculum for juniors and seniors which leads to a B. S. 
degree with a major in social work. This undergraduate program is designed 
to prepare students for a few of the beginning positions in social work, but it 
is established primarily to provide excellent preparation for the graduate 
curriculum. Students who plan to make social work a life career, who want 
to be eligible for appointment to the higher positions, or who want to prepare 
in a specialized field must obtain at least a year of graduate work which leads 
to the professional Certificate of Social Work. All graduate work, including the 
field-work courses, may be used to fulfill the class-work and field-work re- 
quirements for membership in the American Association of Social Workers. 



tOmitted, 194S-49. 



172 Cukricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Professional social-work education is on a graduate basis. In order to make 
possible the fullest development of graduate professional students during the 
ijrst year of basic preparation, and in order to utilize selected field centers off the 
University campus, the department makes use of a block plan of field work. All 
graduate students begin their graduate work on the campus with a 9 weeks 
intensive period of class work. This is followed by a 16 weeks' period of field 
work on a block basis. After completion of the field work, for which the stu- 
dents obtain eight semester hours of graduate credit, they return to the campus 
for a second 9 weeks' period of intensive class work. All students while in field 
work are responsible for their living expenses and remain with the same agency 
for the entire 16 weeks' period unless, in exceptional instances and upon the 
basis for individual need, other plans seem to be more desirable. 

Public social services in West Virginia were greatly expanded by the 
passage of the Federal Social Security Act of 1935 and by the West. Virginia 
Public Welfare Law of 1936. In addition, the postwar period has created an 
unprecedented demand for new personnel. Case workers and child-welfare 
workers are needed for state public-welfare departments and private agencies, 
medical and psychiatric social workers for hospitals and clinics, social-group 
workers for settlements and community centers, community-organization work- 
ers for councils of social agencies and community chests, and administrators 
for all areas of social work. In other words, there are opportunities today for 
placement, advancement, and promotion for well-prepared personnel in both 
the private and public fields of social work. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 
Upper Division 

Students who have completed 58 semester hours of work or more in an ac- 
credited educational institution may be admitted, upon the basis of a written 
application, to the department of social work for the pre^professional curri- 
culum. Application should be made at least three weeks before the beginning 
of the semester for which registration is desired. Application forms may be 
obtained from the head of the department. 

Each applicant is evaluated on the basis of his scholarship, personality, 
health, and other characteristics. In addition, the applicant must be willing to 
provide references, to arrange for a personal interview, if necessary, and to 
furnish written materials which may be requested. 

Graduate Division 

Applicants holding Bachelor's degrees from West Virginia University or 
from other institutions within the State approved by the State Board of 
Education and authorized to confer such degrees, or from institutions outside 
the State standardized by membership in one of the associations of colleges 
and secondary schools, will be considered for admission as graduate students 
in the department of social work. Candidates should apply to the head of the 
department and should present to the Registrar an official transcript of the 
credits upon which their Bachelor's degrees are based. Applications which 
have been approved and recommended by the head of the department are 
submitted to the Graduate Council for final approval. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 173 

Application should be made in person or by a letter at least three weeks 
before the date when a graduate student plans to enter the department. Ap 
plication forms may be obtained from the head of the department. 

Students who have taken the recommended pre-professional curriculum 
at West Virginia University will have fulfilled the undergraduate social-science 
requirements. Students who have not had this curriculum should have an under- 
graduate background of at least 24 semester hours in the social sciences, in- 
cluding preferably at least 12 semester hours in one of the following fields: 
economics, political science, psychology, sociology, or selected courses in his- 
tory. 

Students who have not fulfilled the undergraduate social-science require- 
ments may be admitted to the department of social work on condition that 
they complete such requirements before they become eligible for a pro- 
fessional Certificate of Social Work. The head of the department determines 
the courses needed to meet undergraduate deficiences. 

All students who are applying for admission to the graduate professiona 1 
curriculum are evaluated on the basis of personal characteristics, scholarship, 
health, interest in social work, etc. Personal interviews, when convenient, are 
requested, and all students are asked to submit references. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CERTIFICATE 
OF SOCIAL WORK 

The professional Certificate of Social Work is awarded to those who meet 
the following requirements: 

1. A minimum (including field work) of 30 semester hours of graduate 
social-work credit. 

2. A minimum of two semesters of supervised field work in selected social 
agencies (450 clock hours). 

3. A grade of C or better in all graduate work. 

FIELD WORK 

Field work is a basic requirement for the professional certificate, and it is 
provided in a case-work agency selected by the department. Students give full 
time, with office hours and vacation periods correlated to those of the agency 
staff, for a period of 16 weeks for 8 hours of credit. The experience is designed 
to provide an opportunity for the student to try out his own ability, to apply 
his knowledge, and to develop and test his skills through practice. 

Supervision is provided by supervisors assigned by the selected agencies 
or by faculty members who supervise a unit of students. Monthly reports on stu- 
dent's progress, in addition to material gained through individual and group 
conferences, provide a continuing relationship between the department faculty 
the field work supervisors, and the students. 

LOANS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Numerous loan funds and scholarships are available to properly qualified 
graduate social-work students. For details see Part II, pages 72 to 77. 



174 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Upper Division 1 

220. The Field of Social Work. I. 3 Hrs. Introduction to various fields of 
social work and discussion of the history, scope, organization, problems 
and methods of each. Mr. Fulton or Mr. Sunley 

212. Field-work Observation. II. 2 Hrs. Observation of public-welfare 
administration and casework practice in selected social agencies. Field 
visits to public-welfare departments, private casework agencies, Federal 
Social Security Board offices, United States Employment Service offices, 
health agencies, etc., to observe their structure, scope, and function and to 
obtain limited participation in each program. PR: Social Work 251. 

Mr. Fulton or Miss Hoffman 

230. The History of Social Work. II. 2 Hrs. The European and American 
social-welfare developments; designed to give the students an understand- 
ing of present-day practices and trends of social work. Mr. Sunley 

260. Problems of Child Welfare. I. 3 Hrs. Methods, administrative prob- 
lems, and standards relating to children in foster homes, children born 
out of wedlock, child-labor problems, children in institutions, child-welfare 
services, maternal and child-health services, and child adoption problems. 

Miss Hoffman or Mr. Sunley 

251. Introduction to Social Work. I. 3 Hrs. Relationships of various pro- 
fessional workers to the problems of understanding and treating human 
behavior. Miss Hoffman 

274. Housing. I. 3 Hrs. Urban and rural housing problems. Special atten- 
tion to the historical material and current problems such as Federal and 
Stare legislation, community planning, new types of houses, tenant selec- 
tion, methods of finance, legal difficulties, management, etc. 

Mr. Saposnekow 

285. Aspects of Public Social Services. II. 2 Hrs. A discussion of the men- 
tally ill, mental defectives, the physically handicapped, the sick, and de- 
linquents including historical material, current programs of care and the 
structure, scope, and function of administrative authorities responsible 
for these groups of disadvantaged persons. Mr. Sunley 

Graduate Division 

301. Casework. I. 3 Hrs. Principles and methods of casework as illustrat- 
ed by study and discussion of selected cases. Mr. Fulton 

302. Casework. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Social Work 301 with special 
emphasis on casework in child welfare. PR: Social Work 301. 

Miss Hoffman 
304. Group Work and Community Relationships. I. 3 Hrs. Theory and 
methods in group-work practice, program content and skills of group 
work, and supervisory administrative processes. Also study of communi- 
ties, social problem? and resources, nature of social work, organization of a 
community, and relationship to case work and group work. Mr. Fulton 

311. Field Work. I. 4 Hrs. Field work is given in a casework agency select- 
ed by the department. Supervision is under faculty members and agency 
student supervisors. Students spend an 8-week period in the agency on a 
full-time basis carrying responsibility for a limited case load. Prere- 
quisites or corequisites: 301 and 371. Mr. Fulton and Miss Hoffman 

312. Field Work. II. 4 Hrs. Continuation of Social Work 311. In the sec- 
ond 8-week period students carry a larger case load and are assigned 
cases presenting more complicated problems of family relationships and 
individual adjustments in rural and urban settings. Prerequisites or co- 
requisites: Social work 301, 302, and 311. Mr. Fulton and Miss Hoffman 



J The pre-professional curr'culum also includes Agri. 271, Agricultural Prob- 
lems and Organizations in West Virginia, II, 2 Hrs.: Home Ec. 160, Problems of 
Home Management and Family Living, II, 3 Hrs.; and Econ. 105, Public Welfare 
Accounting, 1, 3 Hrs. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 175 

315. Principles of Psychiatry for Social Work. II. 2 Hrs. Normal growth 
of an individual from the uterine period through infancy, childhood, adoles- 
cence, adulthood, and old age, Emphasis on the ways in which personality 
development is constantly influenced by physical, emotional, psychological, 
and social factors and on the mechanisms individuals utilize to achieve 
balance and maturity. Mr. Knapp and Miss Hoffman 

320. Psychiatric Problems of Casework. II. 2 Hrs. Concepts implied in 
our understanding of human growth and personality development. PR: 
Psychology 1 and Social Work 301. Miss Hoffman, 

344. Domestic Relations and Allied Problems. T. 2 Hrs. Selected legal 
problems such as divorce, non-support, desertion, parent-child relation- 
ships, guardianship and custody, adoption, illegitimacy, wage assignments, 
garnishments, and legal counsel for needy cases. 

Mr. Colson and Mr. Sunley 

351. Social Statistics. I. 2 Hrs. Application of statistical methods to social 
problems and interpretation of statistics concerning dependency, mental 
illness, mental defectiveness, illiteracy, housing, unemployment, etc. 

Mr. Soinley 

360. The Public-welfare Services. I. 3 Hrs. Discussion of scope of public 
welfare, rise of public responsibility, and evolution and analysis of cur- 
rent public-welfare programs. Mr. Sunley 

361. Social-welfare Administration. II. 3 Hrs. Administrative principles 
and processes involved in the organization and operation of social agencies. 
Special attention is given to budgets; control of expenditures; job analy- 
ses; definition of operations; assignment of duties; development of lines 
of responsibility; coordination of services; staff supervision; relation- 
ship of executive to board, staff, and community; use of consultants; 
intake problems; staff development; office management; use of com- 
mittees; public relations; and research. Mr. Sunley 

364. Research Methods. II. 2 Hrs. Discussion of purposes; accepted 
methods of research including use of documentary sources, case studies, 
statistical analyses, and social surveys; techniques and tools of research 
such as sampling, interviewing, schedules, questionnaires, and outlines; 
editing, coding, and classification; and procedures such as choice of sub- 
ject, delimiting the field, preparation and use of a bibliography, collection 
of data, analysis and interpretation of data, and presentation of the re- 
sults of research. Mr. Sunley 

371. Medical Information. I. 3 Hrs. Orientation in the problems of health 
and disease, supplemented by discussions of the case-work implications 
of medical problems. 

Medical School Staff, Lecturers, Miss Hoffman and Mr. Fulton 

380. Social Insurance. II. 3 Hrs. History, principles, method, and problems 
of workmen's compensation, old-age insurance, unemployment insurance, 
and health insurance in the United States and European countries. Special 
attention to problems of coverage, contributions, benefits, methods of 
financing, administrative difficulties, relationship to public-assistance pro- 
grams, and recent legislation. Mr. Sunley 

Sociology 

Professor Harris, Associate Professor Saposnekow, Instructor Kerr 
Some of the professions or activities for which the work of an undergradu- 
ate sociology major furnishes basic preparation are social-science teaching in 
high schools and junior colleges, community recreation leadership, Red Cross 
activities, and Boy and Girl Scout leadership. College training in sociology also 
prepares adult men and women to aid in the organizing and carrying on of non- 
professional activities of a social-welfare nature. These nonprofessional com- 
munity-welfare activities are steadily increasing in importance in our American 
communities. 



176 



CURRlDULAE KKOriitKMKNTK AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



COURSES SUGGESTED FOR SOCIOLOGY MAJORS 
FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. 


E 


r rs. 


Second Sem. E 


r rs. 


First Sem. E 


rs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


English 1 




3 


English 2 


3 


Political Sci. 5 


3 


Political Sci. 6 3 


Biology 




4 


Botany or 




French or 




French or 


French or 






zoology 


4 


German 


3 


German 3 


German 




3 


French or 




Economics 1 


3 


Economics 2 3 


Humanities 


1 


4 


German 


3 


Psychology 1 


3 


Philosophy 4 3 


Mil. sci. 




1 


Humanities 2 


4 


Sociology 1 


3 


Mil. sci. or 2 


Physical educ. 


1 


Mil. sci. 


1 


Mil. sci. or 


2 


Physical educ. 1 








Physical educ. 


1 


Physical educ. 


1 


Sociology 3 3 


14 


to 


16 


14 to 


16 


16 to 


17 


16 to 17 



*1. 

3. 

102. 

105. 

144. 
210. 

231. 

232. 

233. 
234. 
240. 
241. 

243. 
246. 
251. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Lower Division 

Introduction to Sociology. I, II. 3 Hrs. Analysis of the social forces is 
followed by a description of social institutions and social processes. 

Staff 
Rural Sociology. II. 3 Hrs. Distinctive characteristics and problems 
of rural society. Special attention to West Virginia. Mr. Harris 

Upper Division 

Principles of Sociology. I, II. 3 Hrs. Analysis of the social forces, 
social heritage, the more important social processes, of collective be- 
havior, social control, and social change. For upper-division students. Staff 
Urban Sociology. II. 3 Hrs. Rise and growth of urbanism. Problems 
of population, health, housing and sanitation, education and recreation, 
poverty, and crime in the city. Mr. Saposnekow 

Culture and Personality. [f. 3 Hrs. An analysis of significant in- 
terrelations of persons and social groups. Mr. Kerr 
Marriage and the Family. I. 3 Hrs. The modern family in its socio- 
logical, economic and legal aspects; courtship, parent-child interaction; 
problems of divorce and of birth control. Mr. Harris 
Race Relations Problems. I. 3 Hrs. Problems of race relationships, 
with special reference to present-day aspects of the American Negro prob- 
lem. Mr. Harris 
American Minority Peoples. I. 3 Hrs. After a brief historical survey 
of immigration, the economic, industrial, political, and social phases 
of the problems are discussed. Mr. Saposnekow 
Problems of Crime and Delinquency. I. 3 Hrs. Readings, research 
projects, and inspection trips. Mr. Saposnekow 
Social Pathology. II. 3 Hrs. Readings, research projects, and inspec- 
tion trips. Mr. Saposnekow 
Social Control. I. 3 Hrs. The why and how of social-control pro- 
cesses. Mr. Harris 
Community Organization. II. 3 Hrs. Practical and theoretical aspects 
of community and group organization, with special reference to com- 



3 Hrs. 



3 Hrs. 



munity resources. 

Introduction to Anthropology. I 

emphasis on social anthropology. 

History of Social Thought. II. 

theory since Comte and Spencer. 

Contemporary Social Problems. I or II. 

selected social problems which involve economic and political as well as 

social factors. Mr. Harris 



Mr. Harris 

A descriptive survey with 

Mr. Saposnekow 

Development of sociological 

Mr. Saposnekow 

3 Hrs. Analytical study of 



♦Sociology 1 or 102 is prerequisite to all other sociology courses. 



The College of Arts and Sciences J 77 

257. Technology and Society. I. 3 Hrs. Sociological problems created by 
the modern machine and by its application to the processes of production 
and distribution of economic goods. Mr. Harris 

Graduate Division 

391. Seminar in Current Sociological Literature. I or II. 2 to 4 Hrs. Enroll- 
ment by consultation with instructor. Mr. Saposnekow 

392. Seminar in Socia' Institutions. I, II. 2 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Saposnekow 

395. Research and Thesis. I. 2 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Harris 

396. Research and Thesis. II. 2 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Harris 

Speech 

Professor Henning; Associate Professor Feab; Assistant Professor Boyd; Instructors 
Haller, Lambert, Prexdeyille, Robie, Sheppard, and Warfie d 

The curriculum of the Department of Speech is so organized that a student 
may receive comprehensive training in the cultural and practical aspects of any 
one or more of six fields of speech: (1) interpretation; (2) public speaking; (3) 
radio; (4) speech correction; (5) teaching; and (6) theatre. In all courses of 
training in speech skills, professional standards of achievement are emphasized. 

FORENSIC ACTIVITIES. Intramural and intercollegiate forensics, in- 
cluding debate, oratory, and extemporaneous speaking, receive due attention. 
Speech tournaments, trips, and tours as well as campus contests are included in 
the program. Participation in these activities may lead to membership in Delta 
Sigma Rho, honorary forensic fraternity. 

THEATRICAL PERFORMANCES. The University Players, in conjunction 
with the classes in dramatics, present a regular program of plays which affords 
ample opportunity for student participation. In addition, other public and semi- 
public performances are scheduled to provide practical experience for less ad- 
vanced students. Membership in Alpha Psi Omega may be earned by superior 
work in connection with various productions. 

RADIO PROGRAMS. The University Radio Theatre produces a half-hour 
show, broadcast each week over Station WAJR. All regularly enrolled students 
in the University are eligible to audition for any of the programs or plays. 

OFF-CAMPUS SPEECH SERVICES. The Department of Speech sponsors 
and furnishes student programs in the form of short plays, speeches, interpreta- 
tive readingo. and debates for off-campus performance before women's and civic 
clubs, community organizations, and church groups throughout the state. 

■MAJORS. The minimum number of hours in Speech courses for a major is 
30, and for a minor is 15. For those selecting speech as a second teaching field 
the following requirements, totalling 24 hours, are to be met and should be 
scheduled on the basis of the program outlined below for speech majors who 
plan to teach: 
COUESE NAME HOUBS 

. 3. Voice and Diction 3 

11. Public Speaking 3 

121. Argumentation and Debate , 3 

162. Play Directing 3 

250. Speech Correction 3 

270. The Psychology of Speech 3 

Electives 6 

Total 24 



178 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES 

For all speech majors, as well as for those who choose speech as a second 
teaching field, the course in the freshman and sophomore years should be dis- 
tributed as follows: 
Freshman year: first semester: Speech 3. 

second semester: Speech 6, 29. 
Sophomore year: first semester: Speech 11, 50. 

second semester: Speech 51, 120. 
In addition to the above, speech majors who plan to teach speech and 
those who have chosen speech as a second teaching field should select courses' 
in their junior and senior year as follows: 
Junior year: first semester: Speech 161,* 162. 

second semester: Speech 160,* 121. 
Senior year: first semester: Speech 2*21,* 250. 

second semester: Speech 270. 
Speech students who are interested in professional training will choose 
major and minor fields of concentration within the Speech Department. De- 
partmental standards require the satisfactory mastery of a minimum of 12 
hours of upper-division courses in the major speech field and 6 hours of upper- 
division courses in the minor speech field. The minor field should be chosen only 
after consultation with the head of the department. The student will also select 
a regular minor in another department to meet degree requirements. 

PLATFORM TEST. During the first semester of the junior year each speech 
major shall demonstrate his speech proficiency in a 15-minute platform test 
at a time and place designated by the head of the department. Passage) of this 
test shall be prerequisite to continued registration as a speech major. Two 
tests shall be the maximum allowed any student. A student, may petition to 
have any public platform appearance in which he may have occasion to appear 
judged as his platform test. Satisfactory passage will fulfill this requirement. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Lower Division 

3. Voice and Diction. I, II. 3 Hrs. Drills for developing proper breath 
support and for producing a strong, flexible, resonant voice. Coordination 
of mind and voice. Phonetics. Voices recorded and analyzed, with cor- 
rective exercises prescribed. Open to all students. 

Mrs. Fear and Miss Sheppard 
6. Acting. I, II. 3 Hrs. Drills for developing muscular control; for over- 
coming inhibitions; for rendering the body expressive of thought and emo- 
tion. Coordination of mind and body. Open to all students. Mr. Boyd 
11. Public Speaking. I, II. 3 Hrs. Study and application of the principles 
of practical public speaking. Training in the composition and effective 
delivery of speeches for the purpose of developing skill in thinking and 
speaking before an audience. PR: English 1 and 2. Staff 
13. Public Speaking. I, II. 2 Hrs. For Engineering students only. 

Staff 
29. Oral Interpretation. I, II. 3 Hrs. Development of mental and emotion- 
al responsiveness to the printed page. Study of recordings of well-known 
speakers and readers. Practice in reading all types of literature. Open to 
all students. Mrs. Fear and Miss Sheppard 



'Advised, but not required, courses. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 179 

50, 51. Theatrical Methods and Practices. I, II. ?> Hrs. each semester. 
A lecture-laboratory symposium basic to all upper-division theatre courses. 
Covers the basic techniques and terminologies of acting, scene construc- 
tion, lighting, properties and costuming, directing, and theatre history. 
Participation in the actual production of the University Theatre and 
Children's Theatre plays gives each student practical experience in pro- 
ducing the play. Required of all theatre majors and minors. Prere- 
quisite to all upper-division theatre courses. 

Mr. Boyd, Mr. Prendeville, Mr. Warfield 

98, 99. Verse Choir, I, II. 1 Hr. Practice in oral interpretation of litera- 
ture in group speaking. Miss Sheppard 

Upper Division 

INTERPRETATION 

100, 101, 102, 103. Advanced Verse Choir. [, II. 1 Hr. Training in choric 
speech for public performance. PR: Speech 98 or 99 or consent of in- 
structor. Miss Sheppard 
104. Advanced Oral Interpretation. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Speech 29. Mrs. Fear 
113. Advanced Voice and Diction. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Speech 3 or equivalent. 

Mrs. Fear 

200. The Art of Story-Telling. II. 3 Hrs. Principles involved in effective 
presentation of stones with practical experience in the clissroom and be- 
fore audiences. Stories of all types for adults and children studied. 
Offered 1947-48 and alternate years. Mrs. Fear 

201. Oral Interpretation of Poetry. I. 2 Hrs. Alternates with Speech 2*02. 
PR: Speech 104. Offered in 1947-48. Mrs. Fear 

202. Oral Interpretation of Dramatic Literature. I. 2 Hrs. Alternates 
with Speech 201. PR: Speech 104. Not offered in 1947-48. Mrs. Fear 

203. Professional Reading. II. 2 Hrs. For advanced majors only. PR: 
Speech 104. Mrs. Fear 
Voice and Diction Clinic. I, II. Students in speech courses needing 
special attention to problems of breathing, voice production, and diction 
will be given special remedial work in the clinic. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

120. Group Discussion. I, II. 3 Hrs. Theory and practice of the various 
forms of group discussion. Principles, methods, and types of group dis- 
cussions; application to contemporary problems. PR: Speech 11. 

Mr. Henning 

121. Argumentation and Debate. I, II. 3 Hrs. Principles of argument, evidence, 
and reasoning; application to debating. Mr. Robie 

220. Speech Composition. II. 3 Hrs. Materials of speech, organization, and 
style; application to delivery. PR:. Speech 11. Mr. Henning 

221. Persuasion. I. 3 Hrs. Study of and practice in the welding of an 
audience, securing and holding attention, use of suggestion, influencing 
belief, psychology of motivation, and dramatization of ideas. PR: Speech 
121 or equivalent. Mr. Henning 

222. Forms of Public Address. II. 3 Hrs. Composition and delivery of the 
oration, the political speech, the speech of introduction, the dedicatory 
address, and the eulogistic speech. PR: Speech 221. Mr. Henning 

223. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. I, II 3 Hrs. Designed primarily 
for Varsity debaters and Law students. PR: Speech 121. Mr. Robie 

239. Seminar: Problems in Public Speaking. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Henning 

RADIO 

140. Introduction to Radio. I. 3 Hrs. Microphone technique, operational pro- 
cedures, broadcasting systems, critical analysis of programs and radio 
audiences, and FM broadcasting. Mr. Warfield 

141. Radio Announcing. TI. 2 Hrs. Microphone techniques, analysis of audi- 
ence situations, reading commercials, conducting interviews, announcing 
news, sports, and special events. PR: Speech 3. Mr. Warfield 



180 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



142. Radio Acting. I, it. 3 Hit;. A beginning course; characterization and 
interpretation of radio dramas. PR: Speech 140 or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Warfield 

240. Writing for Radio. I. 3 Hrs. Practice in mechanics of radio writing, 
including format, pagination, and typing. Feature and variety programs, 
unit and serial dramas, and the dramatic narrative are covered. Sources 
of material, plot, creation of characters, and good dialogue. Mr. Warfield 

241. Advanced Radio Acting. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Speech 142. Mr. Warfield 

242. Radio Production. I, II. 3 Hrs. Training in planning and producing the 
radio show. Participation in University radio programs. PR: Speech 141 
and 142 or equivalent. Mr. Warfield 

243. Introduction to Television. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Warfield 

(See Department of Physics, College of Engineering, and School of Journal- 
ism for additional radio courses. Credit for these courses can be counted 
toward a radio major in speech.) 

SPEECH CORRECTION 

150. Phonetics. I. 3 Hrs. Sounds of the English language. Adaptation to 
interpretation, drama, radio, and speech correction. Mrs. Fear 

250. Speech Correction. I. 3 Hrs. Defective speech, its causes, methods 
of diagnosis, therapeutic procedures, and prophylaxis. Mr. Henning 

251. Speech Anatomy. I. 3 Hrs. Anatomical and physiological study of 
the speech mechanism. Detailed study of the structures and their func- 
tions of the thorax, larynx, pharynx, oral and nasal cavities, and face. 
Primarily for pre-medical students and students of speech pathology. 

Mr. Henning 

252. Speech Pathology. II. 3 Hrs. Theories and therapies of severe speech 
disorders. PR: Speech 251. Mr. Henning 
Speech Clinic. I, II. Students in speech courses found to possess 
speech defects will be required to attend the clinic for diagnosis and treat- 
ment. Insofar as time will permit, the services of the clinic will be made 
available to any student of the University as well as to the general public. 

THEATRE 

160. Theatrical Make-up. I, II. 1 Hr. Mr. Boyd 

161. Stage Craft. I. 3 Hrs. Problems of plays from the standpoint of the 
technician. Study of scenery design and construction, lighting, properties, 
and costumes through lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory. PR: 
Speech 50 and 51. Mr. Prendeville 

162. Play Directing. I. 3 Hr. PR: Speech 50 and 51. Mr. Boyd 

163. Play Production. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Speech 161. Mr. Prendeville 

164. Theatre Workshop. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. For the production of Universi- 
ty plays and the informal stimulation of interest in creative arts. Open to 
all students. Mr. Prendeville 

260. Advanced Acting. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Speech 6. Mr. Boyd 

261. Studies in Theatrical Dialects. HI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Boyd 

262. Playwriting. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Speech 50 and 51 and consent of instruct- 
or. Mr. Prendeville 

263. Scene Design. I, II. 3 Hrs. Lecture and laboratory course in theories 
of scene design for the stage, including practical participation in planning 
scenery for University productions. Open to juniors and seniors. PR: 
Speech 50, 51, and 161. 

268. Seminar: Problems in Acting and Directing. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Boyd 

269. Seminar: Problems in Play Production. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Prendeville 

RELATED COURSES 

170, 171, 172. Extra-curricular Speech Activities. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. The 
head of the department may grant credit for any extra-curricular speech 
activity which is assigned and directed by a member of the speech staff. 

Staff 



The College of Education 181 



270. The Psychology of Speech. II. 3 Hrs. Psychological principles in- 
volved in the speech situation. Analysis of the roles of emotion, habit, 
learning, judgment, rating, and imagery in speech. PR: 6 hours of psycho- 
logy and 18 hours of speech. Mr. Henning 

275. Speech Problems of Children. Summer Sessions only. 3 Hrs. Normal 
development of speech habits in children. Diagnostic and remedial proce- 
dures for the speech defective are studied. Consideration to relationships 
between speech and allied activities such as reading, spelling, and disci- 
plinary problems. Mr. Henning 

301. Research Problems and Methods. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Graduate standing 

Mr. Henning 

370. Research. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. For graduate students preparing a thesis 
or dissertation. Mr. Henning and Staff 

375. Independent Study. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Open to graduate students with con- 
sent of the department of major interest. Individual programs of study. 

Mr. Henning 



The College of Education 
FUNCTIONS 



Through its undergraduate courses, its seminar, its laboratory schools, 
and its encouragement and direction of education investigation and research, 
the College of Education aims to contribute to the educational efficiency of 
West Virginia by inculcating a liberal and more scientific conception of the 
functions of the public schools of the state and by providing the professional 
training of secondary-school teachers, principals, and supervisors, elementary- 
school principals and supervisors, city-school administrators, county superin- 
tendents, college teachers, educational counselors, and educational research 
specialists. 

ORGANIZATION 

The College of Education comprises the College with its resident courses 
of instruction and its facilities for research; the University Rural High School 
with its opportunities for observation, student teaching, directed supervision, 
and experimentation; and the Laboratory Elementary School with its oppor- 
tunities for graduate study of the progress of pupils. 

The Standing Committees 

SCHOLARSHIP: Messrs. Wheat and Cook and Miss Pollock 
LIBRARY: Messrs. Baldwin, Pederer, and Wheat 

Pre-Education Adviser 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Education requires four years of 
college work, the first two years of which are done in the College of Arts 
and Sciences under the supervision of Prof. Elizabeth M. Stalnaker, pre- 
Education adviser. The student registers in the College of Education for the 
last two years. 



182 Curriculab Requirements and Coueses of Instruction 

Transfer Students 

Applicants from junior colleges, normal schools, teachers colleges, col- 
leges, other universities, or other colleges within this University will, upon 
receipt of official transcript, be admitted to this College with equal standing, 
provided the transcript shows graduation from a standard high school and 
the completion of 58 semester hours of approved freshman and sophomore 
work with an average of at least 1 honor point per credit hour on all work 
presented. Students from other colleges who contemplate transferring to this 
College should so order their courses of study as to meet junior standing and 
should be fulfilling the curricular requirements for the certification of teachers 
as stated in the latest revision of the Bulletin, Requirements Applicable to 
Degrees and to Teacher Certification. 

ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are (1) gradua- 
tion from any approved curriculum in a first-class high school and (2) 58 semes- 
ter hours of approved college work with an average of at least one honor point 
per credit hour on all work presented. 

Upper-division Advisers 

Each junior and senior in the College of Education will be assigned an 
adviser who is a member of the College staff. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

To be eligible for recommendation for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Education, a candidate must: 

1. Comply with the general regulations, as announced in the General 
information section (Part II) of this Catalogue, concerning entrance, advanced 
standing, classification, examination, marks, honor points, etc. 

2. Satisfy the General Requirements for certification, listed in the above 
Bulletin, Requirements Applicable to Degrees and to Teacher Certification. 

3. Complete the required 20 semester hours of approved courses in Edu- 
cation, listed in the above Bulletin. 

4. Select and pursue two teaching fields. s 

5. Adhere to the patterns, listed in the above Bulletin, in completing the 
prescribed number of hours in each teaching field. 

6. Present 128 semester hours of approved college credit, with a general 
average of 1 honor point per credit hour and with an average of 1 honor point 
per credit hour in each teaching field and in Education. (Only credit earned 
in West Virginia University will be used in computing honor points for grad- 
uation). At least 100 of the 128 hours must be in academic subjects. Two 
hours of school health or hygiene may be included in the 100 hours. The 
candidate must have been enrolled in the Co 1 lege of Education for at least 
26 credit hours. 

7. Be at least 18 years of age, of good moral character, interested in edu- 
cational work, and mentally, physically, and otherwise qualified to perform the 
duties of a teacher. 



8 Dur'ng the emergency, because of a shortage of teachers, candidates for the 
B.S. in Education degree will he permitted, but not encouraged, to graduate with 
only a first teaching field. 



The College or Education 183 

Fulfillment of the requirements for graduation from the College of Edu- 
cation qualifies a candidate to apply for recommendation for a West Virginia 
first-class secondary-school teaching certificate. For instruction on applying 
for a state certificate, see the above Bulletin. 

THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses in Education are open only to students of junior, senior, and 
graduate standing. The following courses are required of high-school teachers 
for recommendation for a first-class certificate: Junior year, Ed. 106, 109, and 
2-4 hours of approved electives; Senior year, Ed. 120, 150-170, 214, 224 and 
enough additional hours chosen from the following approved electives to 
meet the minimum requirement of 20 hours in Education: Ed. 101, 112, 136, 
197, 203, 221, 222, 231, 233, 252, 281, 282, 284, 285, 291, 150-170 in a second 
teaching field, 224B (3 hrs.) in a second teaching field, and Psych. 1 (2 hrs.). 

Instructors 

Professors Allen, Baldwin, Hudelson, Noer, Parsons, Pollock, Stemple, and 
Wheat ; Professor Emeritus L. B. Hill ; Associate Professors Cook and C. W. Hill ; 
Assistant Professors Brow t n and Colebank; Instructors Boggess, Brociiick, Brown, 
Butler, Coplin, Eiciier, Federer, Fizer, Gates, Jamison, Meyer, Kapking, Roller, 
Smith, Wilt, and Woofter; Instructor Emeritus Soupart; Teachers Baliker, 
Brennan, Carrico, Dorsey, Proudfoot, Semon, Shaitan, Smrek, Wasmuth and 

Watson. 
NOTE: For the kinds of graduate certificates for which the following 
courses are required or approved see page 188, and for the undergraduate 
certificate see the Bulletin, Requirements Applicable to Degrees and to Teacher 
Certification. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Introduction to Vocational Teaching. II. 2 Hrs. A survey of the field of 
vocational education with particular emphasis on orientation as the 
foundation for occupational preparation. Mr. Allen 

106. Introductory Educational Psychology. I, II. 3 Hrs. Should be taken in 
junior year. Mr. Baldwin, Mr. Cook, Miss Pollock, and Mr. Wheat 

109. Secondary Education. I, II. 2 Hrs. Introduction to secondary-school 
teachers' problems of organization and administration not including 
instructional matters. Staff 

115. Student Teaching in Elementary-school Music. I, II. 2 Hrs. Observation 
and practice of teaching music to pupils in grades one to six in the 
University Laboratory Elementary School. Open to seniors in the School 
of Music who have completed 27 hours in Music and 7 semester hours 
in Education with an honor-point average in each and a general honor 
point average of 1.0. Opportunity for observation and practice is lim- 
ited to one class period (one-half hour) each day each semester for 4 
students. Attendance is required on alternate days, when instruction 
in Music is given, in each of the two classrooms of the Laboratory 
Elementary School. Miss Wasmuth, Mr. Brown 

116. Psychology of the Elementary-school subjects. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Wheat 

117. Materials and Methods of the Elementary School. 2 Hrs. Mr. Wheat 



184 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



120. Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools. I, II. 2 Hrs. Open only to 
those who qualify for the student teaching block. Mr. Cook 

130. Materials and Methods in Elementary-sohool Music. I, II. 1 Hr. (To be 
carried simultaneously with Education 115). Miss Wasmuth, Mr. Brown 

135. The Elementary-school Curriculum. 2 Hrs. Mr. Wheat 

136. High-school Program of Studies. I, II. 2 Hrs. Principles governing the 
selecting of subjects and subject matter for secondary schools with 
special emphasis on possibilities within given subjects. PR: Ed. 109. 

Mr. Stemple 
150-170. Materials and Methods of High-school Teaching. I, II. 2 Hrs. Special 
methods in the various secondary-school teaching fields. For West Vir- 
ginia certification these courses are an integral part of Ed. 224. May 
also be chosen as a two-hour elective by students who are registered 
for student teaching in other fields. 

The various sections of this course, with their instructors, follow: 

150. Biology. I, II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Rapking 

151. Science. 1 2 Hrs. Mr. Allen 

152. Physical Education. L II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Eicher, Mr. Fizer and Miss 

Meyer 
155. Library Science. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Hancock 

160. Agriculture. I, II. 3 Hrs. m Mr. Hill or Mr. Parsons 

161. English. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Brochick, Miss Jamison, Miss Smrek, 

and Miss Woofter 

163. Home Economics. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Boggess 

164. Industrial Arts. I, II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Brenna.i 

165. Mathematics. I, II. 2 His. Miss Wilt 

166. Physical Science. I. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Federer 

167. Social Science. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Coplin and Miss Gates 

168. Art. I, II. 2 Hrs. Mrs. Roller 

169. Music. I, II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Brown and Miss Wasmuth 

170. Commerce. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Smith 
197. Survey of Vocational Education. I. 2 Hrs. The relationship to each other 

and to the public-school program of vocational agricultural, vocational 
home economics, trade and industrial education, commercial education, 
distributive education, rehabilitation, emergency defense training. 

Mr. Allen 
203. Organization and Administration of Adult Education. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Allen 
212. Techniques of Education Evaluation. 2 Hrs. Methods of comparing edu- 
cational products and facilities and making estimates essential in school 
planning and guidance. 
214. Advanced Educational Psychology. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: Ed. 106. Not open 
to juniors. Should be taken parallel or following Ed. 224. Open for 
graduate credit only to those with 6 semester hours of prerequisite work 
in psychology and /or educational psychology. 

Mr. Baldwin and Mr. Wheat 



'A special section available as an elective for those selecting some science 
as a second or third teaching field. All branches of science arc considered. Regis- 
tration no! necessarily concurrent with Ed. 120 ami 224. 



The College of Education 185 

221. Audio-visual Resources for Instruction. I, II. 2 Ilrs. Uses of sensory 
techniques in teaching. Restricted to seniors and graduates. Mr. Allen 

222. Current Practices in Secondary Education. I, II. 2 Hrs. Especial em- 
phasis is placed on the Eight-year Experiment in the thirty schools. 

Miss Pollock 
224, 224B. Student Teaching. I, II. 3 Hrs. each. PR: Evidence of teaching 
traits as shown by personal attitudes, industry, character, general in- 
telligence, good speech habits, physical and mental fitness; completion 
of approximately 75% of the hours required in each of two teaching fields 
and at least 7 semester hours in Education, with a general honor-point 
average of 1.0 and an average of 1.0 in each teaching field and in 
Education. This course is to be taken simultaneously with Ed. 120, 
Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools, and Ed. 150-170. Ed. 224 
will be offered in the University Rural High School or in other student 
teaching centers. One half of the students should reserve a full half 
day each morning and the other half should reserve the entire after- 
noon for this work. AH students must reserve Monday, 7 to 9 p.m., 
bi-weekly, for teachers' meetings. Application for registration should 
be made to Mr. Cook early in the preceding semester. Student 
teaching will be given in the following subject-matter fields: agri- 
culture, art, biology, commerce, English, home economics, industrial 
arts, library science, mathematics, music, physical education, physical 
science, and social studies. Mr. Butler, Mr. Colebank, Mr. Hill or 

Mr. Parsons, and U. R. H. S. Faculty 
231. Philosophy of Education. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Baldwin 

233. Educational Sociology. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Baldwin 

251. Cinematography. 2 Hrs. Practical participation in planning and pro- 
ducing motion pictures for use in teaching, for supporting the school's 
public relations program, and in educational research. Mr. Allen 

258. Education for Special Groups. II. 2 Hrs. A study of the techniques and 
organization of instruction of adults and teen-age youth not in attend- 
ance at ordinary day-school classes. Part-time, evening, and dull-season 
classes are among the educational projects considered. Mr. Allen 

262. Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR or 
parallel: Ed. 120, 163, and 224; home economics, 25 hours. Primarily for 
seniors and teachers of home economics. Miss Noer 

266. Adult Education in Homemaking. I, II. 2 Hrs. Current trends and present 
activities in the field of adult education. Organization of adult classes, 
development of unit outlines; consideration of teaching methods; illus- 
trative material and bibliography for use in adult classes. Staff 

277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Practice Programs in Vocational 
Agriculture. II. 2 Hrs. Planning programs of supervised practice, super- 
vising, and evaluating such programs for all-day, part-time, and evening- 
school students. Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 

278. Planning the Programs and Organizing the Courses for Departments of 
Vocational Agriculture. I. 2 Hrs. Involves gathering data and studying 
the farming problems and practices; for all-day, part-time, and evening- 
school students. Mr. Parsons or Mr. Hill 



186 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

281. History of Elementary and Secondary Education in the United States. 
II. 2 Hrs. 

282. Development of Modern Education. I. 2 Hrs. Comparative study of 
schools in the leading nations of Europe since 1800. Miss Pollock 

284. Pupil-personnel Administration. I. 2 Hrs. Pupil accounting, guidance, 
extra-curricular activities, and control. PR: Ed. 106. Open only to seniors 
and graduates. Mr. Allen 

285. The Junior High School. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Ed. 106. Open only to seniors 
and graduates. Mr. Hudelson 

291. Exploratory Reading. I, II. 2 Hrs. For any teachers or administrators 
who feel the need for a wide acquaintance with books. The work is 
planned to meet the individual needs of students. Miss Pollock 

294. Organization of Industrial Arts. I. 2, Hrs. An advanced course. Prepara- 
tion of comprehensive programs of industrial arts at all scholastic levels. 

Mr. Allen 
Graduate Division 

304. Remedial Techniques in Elementary School Subjects. 2 Hrs. 

305. The County Educational Clinic. 2 Hrs. 

306. The Supervision of Geography. 2 Hrs. 

307. The Supervision of Health and Safety Programs in the Elementary 
Schools. 2 Hrs. 

308. Psychology of Arithmetic. 2 Hrs. Mr. Wheat 

309. Psychology of Reading. 2 Hrs. Mr. Wheat 
316. Psychology of Elementary School Subjects. Mr. Wheat 
322. Organizing Programs of Audio-visual Instruction. 2 Hrs. PR: Ed. 221. 

An advanced course dealing with problems of planning extensive pro- 
grams of using movie, talkie, radio, slides, charts, exhibits, etc., for 
instructional purposes. Mr. Allen 

326. Practice in the Supervision of Elementary-school Instruction. 2 to 3 Hrs. 
PR or parallel: Ed. 316 and Ed. 246. Mr. Wheat 

327. Demonstration and Practice in the Supervision of Secondary-school In- 
struction. 2 to 3 Hrs. PR: Consent of instructor. An opportunity to ob- 
serve approved processes in classroom supervision and to practice, under 
guidance, the art of improving classroom instruction. Mr. Hill 

335. The Elementary-school Curriculum. 3 Hrs. Mr. Wheat 

336. The Secondary-school Curriculum. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Hudelson 

339. Public-school Organization and Administration. I. 2 or 3 Hrs. An orienta- 
tion course for present and prospective school administrators, with 
emphasis upon the problems which grow out of the county unit. Re- 
quired as a basic course of all who specialize in educational administra- 
tion. PR: 20 hours of Education and consent of instructor. Mr. Baldwin 

340. Public-school Finance. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR or parallel: Ed. 339 and consent 
of instructor. Mr. Baldwin 

341. School Buildings and. Equipment. I. 2 Hrs. PR or parallel: Ed. 339 and 
consent of instructor. Mr. Baldwin 

343. School Surveys. 2 Hrs. Development of the educational survey as an 
instrument for improving educational procedures. PR or parallel: Ed. 
339 and consent of instructor. Mr. Baldwin 



The College of Education 187 



344. Staff-personnel Administration. II. 2 Hrs. Selection, induction, direction, 
evaluation, improvement, and promotion of members of the supervisory, 
instructional, research, clerical, and maintenance staffs. PR or parallel: 
Ed. 339 and consent of instructor. Mr. Baldwin 

346. Principles of Supervision. II. 2 Hrs. Basic; general principles of elemen- 
tary-school, junior high-school, and senior high-school supervision as 
applied to sifted content of each subject. Mr. Cook 

353. The Secondary-school Principal. II. 2 to 3 Hrs. Open only to graduate 
students in Education with teaching experience in high school. 

Mr. Hudelson 

356. The Elementary-school Principal. 2 to 3 Hrs. PR or parallel: Ed. 316 
and Ed. 3 in. Mr. Wheat 

357. Organization of Programs in Vocational Education. 2 Hrs. Specific con- 
sideration of the development of practical training in agriculture, home 
economics, industry, and commerce with particular reference to their 
common elements and interdependence. The contribution in method 
and set-up which vocational education has made to current emergency 
programs. Mr. Allen 

360. Problem in Education. I, II. 3 Hrs. One of the alternative requirements 
for the Master's degree in Education. (See Thesis or Option, below). 

Staff 
362. Thesis in Education. I, II. '3 Hrs. One of the alternative requirements 
for the Master's degree in Education (See Thesis or Option, below). 

Staff 
367. Teaching the Social Studies in Elementary and Secondary Schools. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Cook 

372. Statistical Methods in Education. I. 2 Hrs. PR: 20 hours of Education, 
including Ed. 112 or equivalent. Mr. Hudelson 

373. Basic Cource in Principles and Practices of Guidance. 2 Hrs. Overview 
of an adequate guidance service. Ed. 271s, given in summer 1945, 1946, 
and Ed. 252 may be used for this. 

374. Counseling Techniques. 2 Hrs. Study of and practice in techniques of 
counseling. Ed. 271s (2), summer 1946, may be counted for this. 

375. Individual Inventory Techniques. 2 Hrs. Tests, cumulative records, stand- 
ards of achievement, and other means of individual measurement to 
interpret students' individual aptitudes. PR: Ed. 373, 374. 

376. Occupational Information Techniques. 2 Hrs. Surveys and analyses to 
determine the needs, possibilities, and requirements of specific employ- 
ment. 

377. Special Counseling Problems. 2 Hrs. Individual or group problems, chosen 
by the students and approved by the instructor, will be pursued through 
guided reading, observation, and discussion. PR: Ed. 375, 376. 

390. Advanced Course for Teachers of English. 2 Hrs. PR: Consent of in- 
structor. Miss Pollock 

392. Materials for General Reading. II. 2 Hrs. Study of materials for secondary 
schools and for adult classes. PR: Ed. 291. Miss Pollock 

399. Techniques of Educational Research. II. 2 Hrs. PR or parallel: Ed. 372. 

Mr. Hudelson 



188 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Optional Routes Toward a Master's Degree with a Major in Education 

A. Thirty semester hours, including six semester hours of research 
(Education 362, Thesis) and the remaining hours in approved course 
work. Examination (oral, written, or both, at the discretion of the 
individual members of the committee) by the candidate's advisory 
committee. 

B. Thirty semester hours, including three semester hours on a problem 
(Ed. 360, Problem) satisfactory to the adviser only, and 27 semester 
hours of approved course work. Examination (oral, written, or both, 
at the discretion of the individual members of the committee) by an 
advisory committee of three from the College of Education. 

C. Thirty-six semester hours, including a minimum of 10 semester hours 
of approved course work outside the field of Education. A maximum 
of six semester hours may, by prior written agreement with adviser 
and Graduate Council, be accepted from an approved institution 
other than West Virginia University, provided the total of all work 
for the Master's degree by extension and from another institution 
shall not exceed 15 semester hours. Examination (oral, written, or 
both, at the discretion of the individual members of the committee) 
by a committee of at least three, one or more of whom shall repre- 
sent fields other than Education. 

Special Requirements for the Completion of Graduate Degrees 

in Education 

Curriculum: At least 10 of the required 30-36 hours of approved graduate 
work shall be in Education; and the combined undergraduate and graduate 
curriculum shall contain a minimum of 30 semester-hours of Education. 

GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Requirements for Admission to Graduate Work in Education 

1. General requirements for admission to the Graduate School. 

2. First-class teaching certificate or at least 14 hours of under- 
graduate credit in Education. 

The Curriculum for Superintendents Leading to the Degree of 

Master of Arts 

Required for Master's degree 22 Hours 

Ed. 231. Philosophy of Education, OR Ed. 233, Educational 

Sociology 
Ed. 246. Principles of Supervision 
Ed. 316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects 
Ed. 326. Practice in the Supervision of Elementary-school 

Instruction 
Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum, OR Ed. 336, The 

Secondary-school Curriculum 
Ed. 339. Public-school Organization and Administration 



The College of Education 189 



Ed. 340. Public-school Finance 

Ed. 353. The Secondary-school Principal 

Ed. 356. The Elementary-school Principal 

Ed. 372. Statistical Methods in Education 

Ed. 399. Techniques of Educational Research 
Electives in Education for Master's degree (to be chosen with 

adviser's approval) 4 Hours 

Ed. 203. Organization and Administration of Adult Education, 
OR Ed. 357, Organization and Administration of 
Vocational Education 

Ed. 341. School Buildings and Equipment, OR Ed. 343, School 
Surveys, OR Ed. 344, Staff Personnel Administration 

Ed. 360. Problem in Education or Thesis 
Other electives for Master's degree (to be chosen with adviser's 

approval) 2-8 Hours 

Total for Master's degree 30-36 Hours 

NOTE : — For those who already hold a Master's degree and who wish to qualify for 
the University's recommendation for a Superintendent's Certificate, the following 
courses listed above will satisfy : 
Required 16 Hours 

General Administration: Ed. 339 ; 340 ; 203 or 357 ; 341 or 343 

or 334 4-8 Hrs. 

Elementary-school Administration : Ed. 32 6 and 356 4 Hrs. 

Secondary-school Administration : Ed. 246 ; 327 ; 353 4 Hrs. 

Electives 4 Hours 

Ed. 284; 335 ; 336 ; 344 ; 372 

Other requirements for the Superintendent's Certificate are 5 years' experience in 
the public schools of West Virginia, 3 of which shall have been as principal of either 
high school or elementary school or as superintendent or assistant superintendent in 
county and/or district in West Virginia ; and a health certificate. 

Since most of the courses listed above have prerequisites, the consent of the in- 
structor must be obtained before enrollment. 

The Curriculum for High-School Principals Leading to the Degree of 

Master of Arts 1 

Required for Master's degree 14 Hours 

1. High-school Administration 

**Ed. 339. Public-school Organization and Admin- 
istration 2 Hrs. 

**Ed. 353. The Secondary-school Principal 2 Hrs. 

2. Supervision of High-school Instruction 

**Ed. 246. Principles of Supervision 2 Hrs. 

**Ed. 327. Demonstration and Practice in the Super- 
vision of Secondary-school Instruction .... 2 Hrs. 

3. Other Required Courses for Master's degree: 

Ed. 336. The High-school Curriculum 
Ed. 372. Statistical Methods 



Completion of this curriculum also fulfills the scholastic requirements for certifica- 
tion in West Virginia as a high-school principal. Other requirements for the high- 
school principal's certificate are (1) graduation from a standard college or university and 
qualifications for a first-class high-school teaching certificate; (2) three years of 
secondary-school teaching experience; and (3) a health certificate. Since most of the 
courses listed above have prerequisites, the consent of the instructor must be obtained 
before enrollment. 

♦♦Required for recommendation for High-school Principal's Certificate. 
♦Approved electives to complete the 14 semester hours required for recommendation 
for the High-school Principal's Certificate. 



190 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Electives for Master's degree (from other graduate courses in Edu- 
cation or from other fields by permission of adviser) 16-22 Hours 

Suggested electives in Education for Master's degree: 

*Ed. 231. Philosophy of Education or 

*Ed. 233. Educational Sociology 

* Ed. 281. History of Elementary and Secondary Educa- 

tion in the United States 

* Ed. 284. Pupil-personnel Administration 

*Ed. 357. Organization of Programs in Vocational Educa- 
tion 
*Ed. 360. Problem in Education or Thesis 
*Ed. 399. Techniques of Educational Research 

Total for Master's degree 30-36 Hours 

The Curriculum for Elementary-School Principals Leading to the 
Degree of Master of Arts- 
Required for Master's degree 14 Hours 

1. Elementary -school Administration 

**Ed. 339. Public-school Organization and Adminis- 
tration 2 Hrs. 

Ed. 356. The Elementary-school Principal 2 Hrs. 

2. Supervision of Elementary-school Instruction 

**Ed. 246. Principles of Supervision 2 Hrs. 

Ed. 326. Practice in the Supervision of Elemen- 
Electives for Master's degree (approximately half in academic 
tary-school Instruction 2 Hrs. 

3. Other required courses for Master's degree: 

**Ed. 316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects. 

(Ed. 308 and 309 may be substituted.) .... 2 Hrs. 

*Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum 2 Hrs. 

*Ed. 360. Problem in Education or Thesis (dealing 

with a phase of elementary-education.) . . 2 Hrs. 

fields) to be chosen with approval of adviser 16-22 Hours 

Suggested Electives in Education: 

*Ed. 221. Audio-visual Instruction 2 Hrs. 

*Ed. 291. Exploratory Reading 2 Hrs. 

*Bd. 372. Statistical Methods in Education 2 Hrs. 

*Ed. 399. Techniques of Educational Research 2 Hrs. 

Total for Master's degree 30-36 Hours 

Completion of this curriculum also fulfills the Education requirements for the ele- 
mentary-school principal's certificate. Other requirements are (1) three years of 
elementary-school teaching experience; and (2) a health certificate. Since most of the 
courses listed above have prerequisites, the consent of the instructor must be obtained 
before enrollment. 

**Required for recommendation for Elementary Principal's Certificate. 
* Approved Electives to complete the 14 semester hours required for recommendation 
for the Elementary Principal's Certificate. 



The College op Education 191 

The Curriculum for Secondary-School Classroom Teachers Leading to 
the Degree of Master of Arts 

Required: 

Graduate courses in Education 10-20 Hours 

Suggested courses 12 Hours 

Ed. 203. Adult Education 
Ed. 222. Current Practices 
Ed. 231. Philosophy of Education 
Ed. 291. Exploratory Reading 
Ed. 336. The Curriculum 
Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum 
Ed. 360. A Problem in Education OR Thesis 
Graduate courses in a recognized teaching field 

Required 10-20 Hours 

Graduate courses in tributary or supplemental fields 

Required 0-10 Hours 



Total 30-36 Hours 

All courses are to be selected by the candidate subject to the approval 
of his adviser so as to fulfil! the above requirements. 

The Curriculum for Elementary-School Classroom Teachers Leading 
to the Degree of Master of Arts 

Required: 

Ed. 316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects 

(Other approved courses in this field, e.g., Ed. 308, and/or 
Ed. 309, may be substituted for Ed. 316.) 
Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum 
Ed. 360. A Problem in Education or Thesis 
Electives in academic fields (to be chosen with adviser's approval) — 12 hours 

required 
Free electives (in Education or academic fields) to complete a total of 30-36 
hours (to be chosen with adviser's approval) 

Total, 30-36 Hours 

The Curriculum Leading to the Degree of Master of Science in 

Home-Economics Education 

Required: 

Graduate courses in Education 10-20 Hours 

Graduate courses in home economics 10-20 Hours 

Graduate courses in tributary fields 0-10 Hours 

Total 30-36 Hours 



192 CURRICULAK REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The Curriculum for Teacher-Counselor Leading to the Degree of 

Master of Arts 

Required for Master's degree 12 Hours 

Ed. 284. Pupil-personnel Administration 

Ed. 373. Basic Course in Principles and Practices of Guidance 

Ed. 374. Counseling Techniques 

Ed. 375. Individual Inventory Techniques 

Ed. 376. Occupational Information Techniques 

Ed. 377. Special Counseling Problems 
Approved electives 12 Hours 

Econ. 240. Labor Relations 

Econ. 245. Personnel Administration 

Soc. Work 212. Field-work Observation 

Soc. Work 220. The Field of Social Work 

Soc. Work 251. Introduction to Social Work 

Soc. Work 260. Problems of Child Welfare 

Soc. 210. Marriage and the Family 

Soc. 233. Problems of Crime and Delinquency 

Ed. 258. Education for Special Groups 

Ed. 372. Statistical Methods in Education 

Ed. 360, 362. Problem or Thesis 
Free electives 6-12 Hours 



Total for Master's degree 30-36 Hours 

The Curriculum for Counselor Leading to the Degree of 
Master of Arts 4 

Required courses for Master's degree 16 Hours 

Same as required for Teacher-counselor with following additional: 

Ed. 212. Techniques of Evaluation 
OR 

Ed. 372. Educational Statistics 

Ed. 258. Education for Special Groups 
Approved electives 12 Hours 

Same as for Teacher-counselor 
Free electives 2-8 Hours 

Total for Master's degree 30-36 Hours 

Completion of this curriculum also fulfills scholastic requirements for certification 
in West Virginia for a Teacher-counselor Certificate. Other requirements are (1) a 
first-class teaching certificate at the level at which guidance is to be done ; and (2) two 
years' successful teaching experience at the level at which guidance is to be done. 

4 Completion of this curriculum also fulfills the scholastic requirements in West 
Virginia for a Counselor's Certificate. Other requirements are (1) a first-class teaching 
certificate at the level at which the guidance is to be done; (2) 2 years' of successful 
teaching experience at the level at which the guidance is to be done ; and (3) cumulative 
wage-earning experience to a total of no less than 1400 clock hours of regular paid 
employment, as certified by the employer or employers, in agriculture, commerce, and 
industry, or 16 weeks in a cooperative work-experience counselor-training program. 



The College of Engineering 193 



The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts 



The School of Mines 



ORGANIZATION 

The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts 

For the purpose of administration and instruction, the College of Engi- 
neering and Mechanic Arts is organized into the following departments: 
The department of aeronautical engineering (A. E.) 
The department of chemical engineering (Ch. E.) 
The department of civil engineering (C. E.) 
The department of electrical engineering (E. E.) 
The department of mechanical engineering (M. E.) 
The department of mechanics (M.) 

The School of Mines 

All the mining and industrial extension work of the University is organized 
under the School of Mines. For the purpose of administration the school is 
divided into the following divisions: 

The department of mining engineering (E. M.) 

The department of mining and industrial extension. 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The purpose of the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts is to instruct 
students in the fundamental sciences and arts upon which all engineering- 
rests and to impart such special and technical knowledge of the various 
branches of engineering as will enable its graduates to enter them and main- 
tain themselves while gaining their professional experience. To accomplish 
this purpose the work of the college is classified under the following curricula: 
aeronautical engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical 
engineering, and mechanical engineering. For those students desiring a broad- 
er training than is offered in the four-year curricula, a five-year course may be 
taken leading to two degrees. 

The work of the first year is common in aeronautical, chemical, civil, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering. This is also true for mining engineer- 
ing, which is taught in the School of Mines. Because of this common course, 
the student may postpone his choice of engineering branch until the end of the 
first year. By that time he becomes sufficiently acquainted with the various 
fields to*make a wiser selection than would be possible on first entering 
college. In the second year differentiation starts, increasing year by year. 

The course in aeronautical engineering is intended to give the student 
fundamental training in engineering together with special training and 
instruction in aeronautical and related subjects. By a judicious selection of 
electives in the senior year, the student may prepare himself for the field 
of aeronautical design and research or he may prepare himself for the opera- 



194 Curriculae Requirements and Courses of [nstruction 

tional field of aeronautics. Flight training is required in the summer following 
the second year. This together with special instruction already received 
makes it possible for the student to pass the C.A.A. examination for a private 
pilot's certificate. 

The object of the chemical engineering curriculum is to qualify students 
to design, build, and manage manufacturing plants, in which the products of 
manufacture are based on chemical processes, and to fit them for professional 
employment as industrial chemists and chemical engineers. In addition to 
many courses which are required of all students, two options are offered in 
the upper-class work — one in metallurgy and the other in the field of ceramics. 

The course in civil engineering is planned to give the student a substantial 
foundation in the fields of highway, railway, sanitary, municipal, structural, 
and hydraulic engineering. The field of civil engineering is one of the broad- 
est of engineering professions, and yet the work of the civil engineer rests 
upon a relatively compact body of scientific principles. In the third and fourth 
years the student has a choice between a general civil engineering option and 
a sanitary engineering option. If he takes the civil engineering option he 
may choose between work in hydraulic engineering and in highway engineer- 
ing. 

The course in electrical engineering has for its purpose a general training 
in engineering fundamentals together with special training in either the field 
of electrical power development and utilization, or in the field of electrical 
communication and the application of electronic devices to industrial and 
other uses. Since it is impossible to cover both fields adequately in one course, 
the student is offered a choice of two options. One is a power option and the 
other is a communication option. The content of the two options diverges 
in the third and fourth years, where the work is of a more technical and pro- 
fessional character. In the fourth year of either option the student has a 
choice of six hours of electives, and by a proper choice of these, the student 
may either broaden his training or he may specialize further in his chosen 
field. 

Mechanical engineering deals essentially with the design and construction 
of machinery, the development and utilization of power, and the production 
in industry. To this end the student takes a considerable amount of shop work 
in addition to the theoretical courses in the fundamental sciences of mathe- 
matics, chemistry, and physics. In the upper-class work attention is given 
to machine design, power-plant design, refrigeration, heating and ventilation . 
as well as to production methods and industrial management. In the senior 
year, electives in aeronautical engineering more than meet the civil-service 
requirements in that field. 

THE SCHOOL OF MINES 

The School of Mines, established at the University in 1926, was given a 
degree-granting status in July, 1930. For administrative purposes the School 
of Mines is divided into two departments: (1) the department of mining 
engineering, and (2) the department of mining and industrial extension. The 
department offices, laboratories, classrooms, museum, and model rooms are 
located in the Mineral Industries Building. 



The College of Engineering 195 



Resident Instruction 

The School of Mines offers (1) a four-year course leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines, with options in coal mining 
and oil and gas engineering; and (2) a combined science and engineering 
course, extending over five years, lending to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
(at the end of the fourth year) and Bachelor of Science in Engineering of 
Mines (at the end of the fifth year). The work in mining engineering is 
based on fundamental instruction in the development, production, distribution, 
and utilization of coal, petroleum, and natural gas. 

THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

W. A. KOEHLERj Acting Director 

The chief functions of the Engineering Experiment Station are the encour- 
agement and prosecution of research and investigations that will enhance 
the industrial and economical welfare of the people of West Virginia; original 
contributions to the fundamental principles and knowledge along scientific 
and engineering lines, and the stimulation and training of graduate students 
in research activities. The research undertaken by the Station therefore 
is primarily concerned with investigations in the production, processing, 
and utilization of the natural resources of West Virginia; investigations that 
will aid the existing industries of the state and promote the development of 
new industries; and investigations that will aid in the planning, design, and 
development of the public works of the state. As a consequence of this program, 
the subjects receiving particular attention by the staff of the Station are 
coal, oil, gas, clays, stone, sand, timber, water, steam and electric power, sewer- 
age, sanitation, road building, transportation, aeronautics, and communications. 

The Station will assist in compiling surveys and in conducting investi- 
gations of the industrial requirements and possibilities of any region or com- 
munity in the state. It cooperates w T ith the West Virginia Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, the State Road Commission, the State Geological Survey, 
the State Department of Health, the national engineering societies, and state 
or national agencies whose assistance may promote the more effective fulfill- 
ment of the Station's functions. 

To aid industrial organizations in this state that lack facilities and per- 
sonnel to undertake important research investigations which arise in the 
development of their operations, the Station stands ready, where time and 
facilities permit, to assist in the prosecution of investigations on their funda- 
mental problems. Such advisory services are free, but any special equipment, 
materials, or labor that may be needed must be supplied by the organization 
for which the work is done. Several companies and technological associations 
have sponsored research fellowships in the Station. 

The staff of the Station includes part-time services of several of the 
teaching members of the faculties of the College of Engineering and of the 
School of Mines, as well as a few full-time research engineers and chemists 
and part-time graduate student research assistants. 

The results of the studies, surveys, investigations, and researches of the 
Experiment Station are published in bulletin form. Two series of bulletins 



196 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

are issued; to date there are 21 numbers in the Research Series and 23 in 
the Technical Series. The Technical Bulletins contain selected papers from 
the Proceedings of the Annual State Wlater Purification Conferences, the 
State Coal Conferences, and the Appalachian Gas Measurement Short Courses. 
A list of publications and copies of the bulletins may be obtained upon appli- 
cation to the Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

MINING AND INDUSTRIAL EXTENSION 

The department of mining and industrial extension in the School of Mines 
conducts courses of instruction in practical subjects in various sections of 
the state where groups of individuals wish to study and receive training in 
subjects pertaining to their every-day work. The department also aims to 
disseminate useful knowledge which has been amassed by research studies at 
the University to all classes of citizens in the state, and in this way to bring 
the University and its opportunities for learning to various groups of students 
who desire to enroll in its extension department. 
The Short Course in Coal Mining: 

The Short Course in Coal Mining offered by the department of mining 
and industrial extension gives an opportunity to operators, officials, and em- 
ployees of mining companies to obtain instruction pertaining to their work. 
The subjects covered in the short course are: explosives, methods of mining, 
timbering, mine gases, mine ventilation, hoisting, haulage, mine drainage 
safety lamps, mine management, electricity in mines, mine fires and explo- 
sions, safety organization and administration, mining arithmetic, and elemen- 
tary drawing. 

Special attention is given to students desirous of preparing themselves 
for the teaching of mining classes under the Smith-Hughes and George-Dean 
Acts. 

At the close of the short course the West Virginia Department of Mines 
conducts an examination for mine foremen and fire bosses. Tuition is free. 

The thirty-fifth annual session of the Short Course in Coal Mining will 
begin on Monday, June 9, and continue until Saturday, July 19, 1947. For 
further information, write for the special announcement of the Short Course 
in Coal Mining. 
The Short Course in Gas Measurement: 

The first Appalachian Gas Measurement Short Course was conducted in 
1938 by the University in cooperation with the Public Service Commission of 
West Virginia, the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association, the Ameri- 
can Gas Association, and public utilities and industries producing, selling, 
or consuming natural gas in large quantities in West Virginia and surrounding 
states. This course provides instruction in the theory and practice of gas 
measurement and pressure regulation and is designed to be of interest to 
executives and officials of gas companies as well as to metermen. The course 
covers a period of three days and is usually held during the third week of 
August each year. 
Vocational Courses Offered in Extension: 

Courses in foreman training and other special courses for those in industry 



Tin: College oi Engineering i97 



are offered in centers where there is sufficient interest. The services of the 
Department are available for any city or town desiring to establish night 
schools and part-time schools. 

Extension courses in mining are offered under the direction of the Uni- 
versity at various mining towns throughout the state. The instruction in 
these courses is carried on by University extension instructors who visit each 
center every week. At the present time the work is planned on a four-year 
basis to cover the following courses: mine gases, safety lamps, ventilation, 
timbering, explosives, haulage, prevention of mine accidents, mine waste, 
drainage and pumping, mining methods, foremanship, electricity, mine fires 
and explosions, and coai geology. In each of these unit courses, particular 
emphasis is placed on safety features, state mining laws, and application of 
arithmetic to mining problems. 

An intensive course for the training of mine foremen in cooperation 
with the Federal Board of Vocational Education is also offered in certain 
sections of the State. 
Fire Service Extension School: 

An annual training school for firemen is conducted each year in coopera- 
tion with the State Fire Marshal, the National Board of Fire Underwriters, 
and the West Virginia Inspection Bureau. This school is conducted under the 
supervision of R. E. Hanna, Jr., instructor in Fire Service Extension Schools. 
Extension courses in fire-department evolutions, fire protection, and fire pre- 
vention are offered under the direction of the University in cooperation with 
the State Fire Marshal at various fire departments in West Virginia. The 
instruction in these courses is carried on by local University extension in- 
structors in the various departments. The classes meet once each week for 
approximately 30 weeks and cover the following subjects: motor equipment, 
pumps, hose, ropes, ladders, rescue, attack and extinguishment, salvage, venti- 
lation, gases, inspection, overhauling, and minor equipment. Approximately 
one-fifth of the time is spent on actual fire-department evolutions. 
Oil and Gas Extension Classes: 

Extension classes for employees of the oil and gas industries are offered 
at various centers throughout the state by the Mining and Industrial Exten- 
sion Department of the School of Mines. The classes are organized in Septem- 
ber of each year and meet once each week for a period of approximately nine 
months. The instruction is divided into three years' work as follows: First 
Year — mathematics, physics, and applied mechanics; Second Year — fluid 
mechanics, oil and gas transmission, gas measurement, pressure regulation, and 
control; Third Year — combustion and utilization of gas, oil and gas geology, 
and principles of industrial management. Fourth Year — geology, economics, 
and prime movers. 
The Coal Conference on Combustion: 

Since 1937, the School of Mines has sponsored each year an annual Coal 
Conference at Morgantown. These conferences have been devoted to the study 
of the problems incident to the marketing and utilization of coal and to the 
promotion of research investigations that may assist in the retention and 
expansion of coal markets. The annual Coal Conference will again be held 
at Morgantown in 1947; dates will be announced later. 



198 Curriculab Requirements a.nd Courses of [nstructIon 

Water Purification Conferences: 

An annual conference on water purification is held each year in coopera- 
tion with the State Department of Health. A number of out-of-state engineers 
are invited to present papers at the conference. The State Department of 
Health and College of Engineering cooperate in the program. These confer- 
ences are held under the supervision of H. W. Speiden. 
Electric Meter Conferences: 

Conferences for men interested in the metering of electrical energy will 
be arranged to suit the convenience of those interested. Each group should 
consist of from eight to twelve men who have at least a working knowledge 
of elementary algebra and trigonometry. Conferences may be arranged by 
writing to Professor A. A. Hall and are usually expected to be for 10-day 
periods devoted to current practices as well as to the basic theory of electrical 
meters, their connections and testing. 
Mine Electrician's Conference: 

Conferences for men engaged in the application of electrical energy to 
the mining industry will be arranged for at certain times, in connection with 
the department of electrical engineering, when such work does not conflict 
with the regular University classes. Such groups should consist of not less 
than ten or more then fifteen men who should have at least a working knowl- 
edge of arithmetic and elementary electrical laws. Conferences may be ar- 
ranged for by writing to Prof. C. T. Holland, Assistant Director of Mining 
Extension, and are expected to be from three- to five-day periods of class 
study and laboratory work in the department of electrical engineering. 

The Standing Committees 

ENGINEERING SCHEDULES: Associate Professors E. C. Jones, Simons, and 
Baker; Assistant Professor Reynolds. 

ENGINEERING SOCIETY: Professors Forman, Boomsliter, Koehler, and H. M. 
Gather ; Associate Professor Baker. 

LIBRARY: Professor Speiden, Associate Professor Seibert, and Instructor Pierce. 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIP: Professors Hall and Koehler; Associate Pro- 
fessor C. H. Cather. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Any student, in order to be eligible to receive a Bachelor's degree in any 
branch of Engineering for which degrees are offered, in addition to satisfying 
all entrance requirements shall be required to complete satisfactorily 144 
semester hours of work as specified in the curriculum of the department 
leading to the degree for which the student is a candidate, plus the general 
requirements of physical education and military science required by the Uni- 
versity for such a degree. 

NOTE: At present the University requires of all male students, unless 
permanently exempted therefrom in each case, 2 semester hours of physical 
education and 8 semester hours of military science; and of all female students, 
unless permanently exempted therefrom, 4 semester hours of physical educa- 
tion. Students entering with 58 hours of credit are also exempted. 



The College of Engineering 199 



Substitutions 

The following substitutions are regularly allowed in addition to special 
substitutions listed elsewhere: 

Chemistry 5, 6, 106, 15 or 115 (2 to 5 hrs.) for Chemistry 10. 

Chemistry 5, 10, or 105 for Chemistry 105s. 

Chemistry 115 for Chemistry 15. 

Chemistry 6 or 106 (5 hrs.) for Chemistry 15 and 107. 

Economics 1 and 2 or Is and 2s for Economics 103 or 30. 

English Is and 2s for either English 1 or 2. 

C. E. 201 for C. E. 115 Lab. 

M. E. 25 for C. E. 10. 

M. E. 29 for M. E. 27. 

Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, 109, and 110 for Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108. 

Speech 11 for Speech 13. 

Thesis 

Any candidate for a baccalaureate degree in engineering may with the 
consent of his major professor prepare a thesis on some subject relating to a 
special branch of engineering or other department of applied science. It will 
be presented for approval first to the instructor under whose guidance it has 
been prepared, then to the head of the department in which the degree is to 
be conferred. A typewritten copy of the thesis prepared in accordance with 
official specifications and signed by both the instructor in charge and the head 
of the department, must be placed in the University library before graduation. 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Aeronautical Engineering. 

2. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Chemical Engineering, with options in metallurgy and ceramics. 

3. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering, with option in sanitary engineering. 

4. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Electrical Engineering, with option in power and communications. 

5. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in .Mechanical Engineering, with electives in power and industrial engineering. 

6. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over five or 
more years leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering. 

7. A two-year curriculum leading to the certificate as Electronic and Radio 
Technician. 

The Freshman Schedule 
In order to permit all students in the College of Engineering and the 
School of Mines to have a year in which to find out definitely what curriculum 
they wish to pursue, the first year of all engineering curricula is made uni- 
form. To assist the student in making an intelligent choice, a series of weekly 
lectures is given throughout the first semester explaining the work of the 
several branches of engineering. 



200 Okkhti.ai; Ki:gni;i:M i:\ts and COURSES OF Lxstki rcrtOJM 

FIRST YEAR 

(Identical for all engineering and mining courses) 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 1 — 'Comp. and Rhet 3 Eng. 2 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 3 — College Algebra 3 Math. 5 — Analytical Geom 4 

Math. 4 — Plane Trig 3 Chem. 2 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Chem. 1 — Inorganic Chem 4 Mil. 2 — Military Science 2 

Mil. 1— Military Science 2 P. E. 2 — Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

P.E. 1— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 C. E. 1— Surveying 2 

M. E. 20— Mechanical Drawing 3 M. E. 26 — Descriptive Geom 3 

G. 1 — Engineering Lectures 

19 19 

Aeronautical Engineering 

The curriculum in aeronautical engineering is designed to give the stu- 
dent a general training in engineering fundamentals and specialized training in 
either of two fields according to the student's choice. The options offered are 
aerodynamic and structural design (Option I) and aircraft power plants 
(Option II). While the primary objective of Option I is to provide training 
in the aerodynamic and structural design of the airplane and that of Option 
II is to provide training in aircraft power plants, it is possible for the student 
to enter other specialized fields by selecting appropriate electives and by ac- 
quiring the proper supplementary experience. 

The two options are of the same course content through the third year 
except for a difference of one course in the second semester of the third year. 
Those students selecting Option I take basic airplane structures at this 
time, while those selecting Option II take internal cumbustion engines. 

In the fourth year the courses are of a specialized nature governed by the 
particular option selected. 

The fact that the University has its own planes and a hangar at the 
Morgantown Municipal Airport is an advantage in that it makes p.ossible 
flight instruction as well as adequate instruction in the maintenance and 
repair of aircraft equipment and affords an opportunity for the detailed study 
of aircraft and its component parts. Flight training, though not required, is 
recommended for students planning to become aeronautical engineers. 

Curriculum in Aeronautical Engineering 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering 
FIRST YEAR- See Curriculum above. 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR 

Hrs. 

M. E. 7s— Welding and Heat Treatment 1 

M. E. 11 — Machine Shop 2 

A. E. 15 — Aircraft Repair and Maintenance 2 

5 



The College or Engineering 



201 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Phys. 105— G. Physics 4 

Phys. 107— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3 — Science and Tactics 2 

Econ. 30 — Fund, of Economics .... 3 
Speech 11— Effective Speaking ... 3 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Phys. 106— G. Physics 4 

Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108 — Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Science and Tactics 2 

M. 101— Statics 3 

M. E. 27— Mechanism 2 

A. E. 16 — Elementary Aerodynamics 3 



17 



19 



THIRD YEAR 



First Semester 

M. 102— Mechanics of Matls 

M. 103— Matls. Testing Lab 

M. E. 221 — Thermodynamics 

Math. 253— Adv. Math, for Engrs. 

M. 104 — Kinetics 

E. E. 102— Elements of E. E 

G. 101— Eng'g. Society 



Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

4 E. E. 103— Elements of E. E 4 

1 A. E. 222— Aircraft Propulsion ... 2 

3 M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

3 A. E. 202 — Aerodynamics 3 

3 C. E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 3 

4 A. E. 210 — Basic Airplane Struct. 
% (Option I) 3 

M. E. 229 — Int. Comb. Engines 

(Option II) 3 

G. 102— Eng'g. Society % 

18% 17% 



FOURTH YEAR 
OPTION I— AERODYNAMIC AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN 



A. E. 204 — Airplane Performance . 2 

M. E. 113— Machine Design 4 

A. E. 205 — Experimental Aero .... 2 
A. E. 211 — Structural Design of 

Metal Airplanes 4 

Ch. E. 227— Aircraft Structural 

Materials 2 

Electives 5 



A. E. 203 — Chordwise & Spanwise 3 

Air Load Dist. 

M.E. 229— Int. Comb. Engines .. 2 

A. E. 212— Airplane Design 3 

A. E. 213— Airplane Struct. Lab. . . 1 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 

Electives 7 

G. 104— Eng'g. Society % 



G. 103 — Eng'g. Society % Inspection Trip 

19% 



19% 



*OPTION II— AIRCRAFT POWER PLANTS 



Ch. E. 227— Aircraft Structural 

Materials 2 A. E. 223— Aircraft Engine Design 3 

A.E. 205— Exp. Aero 2 A. E. 225— Aircraft Engine Lab. . . 2 

A. E. 210— Basic Airplane Struct. . 3 G. 110— Business Law 3 

A. E. 221 — Aircraft Engines 3 Electives 11 

M. E. 113 — Machine Design 4 G. 104 — Engineering Society .... % 

Electives 5 Inspection Trip 

G. 103 — Engineering Society % 

19% 

19% 

* To be omitted until there is adequate student demand. 



202 



Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



ELECTIVES IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 



A. E. 101— Flight Training 1 

A. E. 102— Flight Training 1 

A. E. 124— Thesis 2 to 5 

A. E. 241— Air Navigation 2 

C. E. 120— Matls. of Const 2 

C. E. 201— Hydr. Measurements . . 1 
Ch. E. 211 — Fuels and Comb. . .2 or 3 
E. E. 274 — Indus. Applications of 

Electric Control 3 

A.E. 120— Aviation Gr. School 2 

A.E. 121— Adv. Flight Training... 1 



A.E. 123— Adv. Flight Training . . 1 

Geog. 107 — Global Geography 3 

Geol. 12 — Meteorology 3 

Modern language 6 

Advanced math., mechanics, or 

physics 3 to 8 

Mil. 105-108 1 to 6 

M. E. 203 — Advanced Machine 

Design 4 

M. E. 205 — Industrial Engineering 3 
Physiol. 215 — Aviation Physiol. . . 1 



Chemical Engineering 

The standard four-year course in chemical engineering has been developed 
to qualify young men for positions in operation, design, construction, and 
management of manufacturing plants in which the raw materials are sub- 
jected to chemical changes and processes to produce the finished products. 
This curriculum (page 23) includes fundamental courses: in mathematics — 
through calculus; in chemistry — inorganic, analytical, organic, and physical; 
in physics; in basic engineering — surveying, mechanical drawing, mechanism, 
mechanics, strength of materials, and fluid flow; in heat and power engineer- 
ing; in electrical engineering; in mineralogy and metallurgy; in chemical 
engineering — principles, calculations, thermodynamics, design, unit operations, 
unit organic processes, heat transfer, and economics; in electro-chemical 
industries, inorganic, and organic technology. This curriculum provides the 
student with a broad foundation in the fundamental principles of those sub- 
jects which wide experience has shown are essential for a successful career 
in the chemical engineering profession; or as engineers in any industry in- 
volving a succession of individual or unit operations. 

To complete the requirements for the B. S. Ch. E. degree in four years, 
students should follow the curriculum as outlined, taking all required shop 
courses and qualitative analysis in the summer session; also, it is definitely 
advisable to take Physical Chemistry 260 and 261 in the Summer Session be- 
fore the third year. Modifications in the standard chemical engineering cur- 
riculum for the ceramic and metallurgy options are outlined below. 

Students preparing to take chemical engineering should present for 
entrance as many units as possible in mathematics, chemistry, and physics; 
also units in German, French, or Spanish. While certain basic courses in Eng- 
lish, economics, and public speaking are required in the regular Ch. E. cur- 
riculum, a student will obtain a broader education in economics, history, 
language, science, applied technology, and engineering by taking the combined 
Bachelor of Science and Chemical Engineering course. By a careful selection 
of electives both degrees may be earned in five years. 

Ceramics Option — Chemical engineering and ceramics have many basic 
concepts and engineering principles in common. Students selecting the cera- 
mics option can obtain all required courses in chemical engineering and should 
take the following as their senior electives: Ch. E. 230 (3 hrs.), Ch. E. 232 
(2 hrs.) and Ch. E. 233 (2 hrs.). Students showing marked ability in ceramics 
may select Ch. E. 124 (2 hrs.) in place of either of the latter two courses. 



The College of Engineering 



203 



Most students graduating with ceramic option complete more than the required 
number of hours, hence should preferably take also Ch. E. 211 (2 or 3 hrs.) 
and Ch. E. 231 (2 hrs.). 

Metallurgy Option — The metallurgical industries apply many of the uint 
operations and fundamental principles studied in the chemical engineering 
curriculum. Students selecting the metallurgy option should take Ch. E. 222 
(2 hrs.) and Ch. E. 223 (3 hrs.), and should preferably also take Ch. E. 211 
(2 or 3 hiV) and Ch. E. 213 (2 hrs.) and Ch. E. 232 (2 hrs.). Students having 
special aptitude in metallurgy may take Ch. E. 124 (2-5 hrs.). By taking these 
elective courses the student should be well prepared to begin his career in a 
metallurgical industry. 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 200 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR 

Hrs. 

M. E. 7— Welding and Heat Treat.* . . 1 hr. Chem. 105s— Qual Anal 2 

M. E. 11— Machine Work 2 

SECOND YEAR 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Phys. 105— G. Physics 4 Phys. 106— G. Physics 4 



Phys. 107— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 2 

Chem. 15 — Quant. Analysis 3 

Speech 13— Effective 

Speaking 2 

Econ. 30 — Fund, of Economics ... 3 



Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

Chem. 107 — Quant. Analysis .... 2 

E. M. 106 — Mineralogy 1 

M. 101— Statics 3 

M. E. 27— Mechanism 2 



19 
THIRD 

Chem. 233 — Organic Chem 5 

Chem. 260— Physical Chem 3 

Ch. E. 205— Elements of 

Ch. E 3 

Ch. E. 206— Eng'g. Chem. Lab. ... 1 

E. M. 202— Coal Lab 1 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials 4 

Ch. E. 109-^Ch. E. Economics 2 

G. 101 — Engineering Society V 2 



19 
YEAR 

Ch. E. 201— Unit Organic 

processes 3 

Chem. 261— Physical Chem 3 

Ch. E. 105— Chem. Eng'g. Design . 2 
Ch. E. 208^Chem. Eng'g. Lab. ... 2 
M. E. 220 — Heat and Pow. Eng'g. . 3 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

C. E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 2 

G. 102 — Engineering Society y 2 



19 y 2 

FOURTH 

Ch. E. 204— Chem. Eng'g. Calc. . . 2 
Ch. E. 207— Prin. Chem. Eng'g. . . 2 
Ch. E, 209— Chem. Eng'g. Lab. . . 2 
Ch. E. 214-^Inorganic Chem. 

Techn 2 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

Ch. E. 221— Metallurgy Lab 1 

E. E. 110— Elements of E. E 5 

G. 103 — Engineering Society y 2 

Electives — (see below) 1 

17% 



i8y 2 

YEAR 

Ch. E. 203— Ch. E. 

Thermodynamics 2 

Ch. E. 210— Electrochem. Ind 3 

Ch. E. 215 — Organic Chem. 

Techn 2 

Ch. E. 216— Chem. Eng'g. Design . 2 
Ch. E. 219— Prin. Chem. Eng'g. ... 2 

G. 104 — Engineering Society y 2 

Electives — (see below) 6 

Inspection Trip 



♦Recommended for students taking metallurgy option. 



17H 



204 CURRICULAB REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ELECTIVES IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Ch. E. 124— Thesis 2 to 5 M. 103— Materials Test. Lab 1 

Ch. E. 202— Water Exam. Ch. E. 2*23— Metallography 2 to 3 

and Purif 2 Ch. E. 232— Refractories 2 

Ch. E. 211— Fuels and C. E. 122— Structural 

Combust 2 to 3 Engineering 2 to 3 

Ch. E. 217— Evapn. & Distiln 2 M. E. 205— Industrial Eng'g 3 

Ch. E. 218— Adv. Chem. Eng'g Geol. 1— G. Geology 3 

Design 2 German 1 and 2 • 6 

Ch. E. 222— Non-Ferrous Mil. 105-108— Adv. 

Metallurgy 2 Military : 1 to 6 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering includes the measurement of land surfaces and the 
production of maps, the design, construction, and operation of transportation 
facilities, the design and construction of fixed structures, sanitary and munic- 
ipal engineering, and hydraulic engieering. 

The measurement of land surfaces is done by some kind of surveying 
such as plane, topographic, or geodetic. The survey may be conducted entirely 
on the surface or it may combine the use of surface and aerial methods. 
Transportation facilities divide readily into highway, railway, water, and air 
groups, the work of the civil engineer being most directly concerned with the 
construction and maintenance of the fixed portions of the system in each case. 
Among the large number of fixed structures in the civil engineer's field are 
bridges, buildings, tunnels, subways, foundations, walls, and piers. Sanitary 
and municipal engineering cover the design, maintenance, and operation of 
water supplies, water purification plants, distribution systems, sewer systems, 
sewage-disposal plants, and garbage-disposal plants. Hydraulic engineering 
deals with the design and construction of water-power installations, dry docks, 
locks and dams, flood control, and irrigation projects. 

The civil engineering curriculum has been planned to give broad educa- 
tion in those general and scientific subjects which form the foundation of all 
engineering, and a special training in the field of civil engineering. During 
the first two years emphasis is placed on subjects such as English, mathematics, 
chemistry, physics, mechanical drawing, and surveying. These subjects are 
taught, not as an end in themselves, but rather as tools for the solution of 
engineering problems. The teaching is done by means of recitations, laboratory 
work, drawing room work, and field practice. During these first two years 
instruction is also given in military training and physical education, which help 
to keep the student physically fit. In the third and fourth years the applica- 
tion of these basic courses is made to the solution of engineering problems. 
Breadth of training is furnished by courses in mechanics, economics, bacteri- 
ology, geology, electricity, and heat and power engineering. Depth of training 
is furnished by professional work in highway, railway, structural, sanitary, 
and hydraulic engineering. 

The civil engineering professional field is too wide to be covered thor- 
oughly in a four-year course. For this reason, during the latter part of the 
course, certain options are offered. In addition to the sanitary engineering 
option outlined below, the student is offered a choice between two options 
in the fourth year, one of which devotes more time to transportation while 
the other stresses hydraulic engineering. 



The College op Engineering 



205 



Sanitary Engineering Option 

Students in civil engineering who desire to specialize in sanitary engi- 
neering are required to make the following regular substitutions: 

Fourth year: first semester: C. E. 202, Water Purification, 3 hrs., for C. E. 
103. C. E. 117, Municipal Engineering, is required instead of the 2 hours of 
optional subjects. Second semester: C. E. 203, Sewage Disposal, 3 hrs., for 
C. E. 204. Ch. E. 202, Water Examination, is required instead of 2 hours of 
optional subjects. 

Curriculum in Civil Engineering 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 200 

SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Chem. 10 — Quant. Analysis 2 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 2 

Speech 13— Effective Spk 2 

C. E. 2— Surveying 4 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

C. E. 3— Railroad Curves 2 

M. 101— Statics 3 

Geol. 1— G. Geology 3 



19 
C. E. 4s — Summer Surveying (five weeks) . . . 

THIRD YEAR 



19 



Econ. 103 — Econ. and Acct 3 

M. 102 — Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103— Materials Test. Lab 1 

C. E. 110— Struct. Drafting 2 

M. E. 220— Heat & Pow. 

Eng'g 3 

E. E. 110— Elements of E. E 5 



Bus. 110— Acct. for Engrs 2 

C. E. 101— El. of Hwy. Eng'g 3 

C. E. 115 — Fluid Mechanics 3 

C. E. 121— Structural Eng'g 4 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

Bact. 141 — Bacteriology 3 

Geol. 2— Geol. Lab 1 



G. 101 — Engineering Society y 2 G. 102 — Engineering Society 



V2 



18% 
FOURTH YEAR 



19 y 2 



C. E. 116— Water Supply 

Eng'g 4 

C. E. 120— Materials of Constr. , . 2 

C. E. 123— Bridge Design 3 

C. E. 207— Foundations 3 

G. 103 — Engineering Society % 

C. E. 103— Highway Design 3 

Electives — (see below) 2 



C. E. 102— Railway Eng'g 3 

C. E. 118— Sewerage 3 

C. E. 206 — Reinforced Concrete . . 3 

G. 110— Business Law 3 

G. 104 — Engineering Society % 

Inspection Trip 

C. E. 204— Advanced Structs 3 

Electives — (see below) 2 



17% 
ELECTIVES 



17% 



C. E. 200 — Water Power 

Eng'g 2 

Ch. E. 202— Water Ex 2 

C. E. 208— Trans. Econ 2 



C. E. 209— Highway Lab 2 

C. E. 124— Thesis 2 or 4 

C. E. 210 — Photogrammetry 2 

Mil. 105-108— Adv. Military ...1 to 6 



NOTE : Students offering 6 hours of Advanced Military for Engineers toward their 
degree are not required to take Speech 13. 



206 Curriculak Requirements and Courses op Instruction 

Electrical Engineering 

(POWER OPTION) 

The course in electrical engineering has been developed for the purpose 
cf giving to the student who completes the course a general training in engi- 
neering fundamentals and special training in either the electrical power field 
or the communication field. The curriculum in electrical engineering has two 
options. One is the power option, described below. The other is the communi- 
cation option, described on a later page. 

In the first two years of electrical engineering the work is confined 
mostly to those subjects which are essential as preparatory courses for the 
more technical courses which follow in the third and fourth years. This 
preparatory instruction supplies the requisite foundation in English, mathe- 
matics, physics, mechanics, chemistry, economics, drafting, and the elements 
of shop practice. 

The studies pursued during the third year are those of fundamental im- 
portance to the electrical engineer. The subject matter includes additional 
mechanics, Engineering Society, courses in thermodynamics, heat engines, 
mechanical laboratory, and the following electrical subjects: direct-current 
machines, direct-current machines laboratory, electrical calculation and de- 
sign, alternating-current theory, principles of alternating-current machines, 
electronics, and illumination. 

In the fourth year the subject matter consists of additional Engineering 
Society, courses in kinetics, fluid mechanics, business law and the following 
electrical subjects: a year's study of alternating-current machines and a 
course in each of the following: electrical control, electrical communication, 
electrical engineering laboratory, advanced electrical laboratory, electrical 
power transmission, and engineering economics. In this year the student has a 
choice of six hours of electives to be selected from a group of subjects most 
of which are professional in character. By a proper selection of these electives 
the student may either broaden his training or else he may continue further 
specialization in the power field. 

It will be observed that for many of the courses scheduled in this cur- 
riculum, the work of the classroom is supplemented by concurrent work in 
the laboratory or drafting room. By means of experimental work in the labora- 
tory, followed with well-written reports and the problems in the design of 
electrical apparatus, the student acquires a clearer conception of the facts 
and principles discussed in the classroom and also a working knowledge of 
the subject matter. All of this is essential if he is to become a successful 
electrical engineer. 

In the course in electrical industry as a public utility, general economic 
considerations are applied to the problems of electric power generation, the 
transmission and use of electric power, and the selection of electrical and 
allied equipment for the economic utilization of electric power. Also the study 
and analysis of rate structures is taken up. This course and the course in 
business law are valuable inclusions in the power option for the student who 
is interested in taking up administrative work. 



The College ok Engineering 



2<¥7 



Curriculum in Electrical Engineering 

(POWER OPTION) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 200 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR 



Hrs. 

M. E. 11 — Machine Shop 2 

M. E. 7— Welding & Heat Treat- 
ment 1 



Hrs. 



E. E. 3— Intro. Elect. Eng'g 2 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Phys. 105— G. Physics 4 

Phys. 107 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3— Military Science 2 

Econ. 30 — Fund, of Econ 3 

Speech 11— Effective Spk 3 

M. E. 27 — Mechanism 2 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Phys. 106— G. Physics 4 

Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

E. E. 100— Elem. of Elect. 

Eng'g 4 

M. 101— Statics 3 



19 
THIRD YEAR 



18 



E. E. 104— Illumination 2 

E. E. 230— D. C. Machinery 3 

E. E. 231— D. C. Mach. Lab 2 

E.E. 235— A. C. Theory 4 

Mathematics 253 3 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

M. E. 221 — Thermodynamics 3 



E. E. 237— Prin. of A. C. 

Mach 4 

E. E. 244— Elec. Calc. & 

Design 3 

E. E. 250 — Electronics 4 

M. 102— Strength of Materials 4 

M. E. 222— Heat Engines 3 



G. 101— Eng'g. Society % G. 102— Eng'g. Society % 



19% 
FOURTH YEAR 



18% 



E. E. 239— A. C. Machinery 3 

E. E. 241— Elect. Eng. Lab 2 

E. E. 245— Electric Control 2 

E. E. 280 — Elect. Communication . 3 

C. E. 115 — Fluid Mechanics 2 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

Electives 3 

G. 103 — Eng'g. Society 



% 
18% 



E. E. 240— A. C. Machinery 3 

E. E. 242— Adv. Elect. Lab 2 

E. E. 247— Elect. Power 

Transmission 3 

E. E. 270— Elect. Ind. as a Pub. 

Utility 3 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 

Electives 3 

G. 104— Eng'g. Society % 



17% 



ELECTIVES 



E. E. 124— Thesis 2 to 5 

E. E. 253-354— Radio Eng'g 6 

E. E. 274— Ind. Appl. of Elect. 

Control 3 

E. E. 280-281— Elect. Probl. ...1 to 6 
E. E. 282— Symmetrical Comp. . . 3 



E. E. 283— Telephone Eng'g 3 

E. E. 286— Industrial Control 3 

Advanced Math 3 

Ch. E. 210— Electr. Chem. Ind. 2 or 3 
M. E. 223— Steam Pow. Plants ... 3 

M. E. 228— Eng'g. Lab 2 

Mil. 105-108— Adv. Military . . .1 to 6 



2<)8 Ci rricular Requirements and Courskk of Instruction 

Electrical Engineering 

(COMMUNICATION OPTION) 

The course in electrical engineering has been developed for the purpose 
of giving to the student who completes the course a general training in 
engineering fundamentals and special training in either the electrical power 
field or the field of electrical communication. The curriculum in electrical 
engineering has two options. One is a power option (described on a preceding 
page) a:id the other is a communication option (described on this page). In 
the first two years of electrical engineering the work is confined mostly to 
those subjects which are essential as preparatory courses for the more tech- 
nical courses which follow in the third and fourth years. This preparatory 
instruction supplies the requisite foundation in English, mathematics, physics, 
mechanics, chemistry, economics, drafting, and the elements of shop practice. 

The studies pursued during the third year are those of fundamental im- 
portance to the electrical engineer. The subject matter includes additional 
mechanics, Engineering Society, a course in heat and power engineering, and 
the following electrical courses: direct-current machines, direct-current 
machines laboratory, alternating-current theory, principles of alternating- 
current machines, and electronics, with the following subject matter of special 
importance in communication work: Two courses of advanced mathematics 
intended to provide proficiency in mathematical analysis as an aid in the study 
of advanced courses in communication. A laboratory course in electrical 
measurements to develop the technique of precise measurements in com- 
munication work. 

In the fourth year the subject matter consists of additional Engineering 
Society, courses in fluid mechanics, business law, illumination, engineering 
economics, and communication subjects consisting of two semesters of electrical 
communication, and two semesters of radio engineering with the accompanying 
laboratory. In this year the student has a choice of six hours of electives to 
be selected from a group of subjects most of which are professional in char- 
acter. By a proper choice of these electives the student may either broaden 
his training, or else he may continue further specialization in the communi- 
cation field. 

It will be observed that for many of the courses scheduled in this cur- 
riculum, the work of the classroom is supplemented by concurrent work in 
the laboratory or drafting room. By means of experimental work in the lab- 
oratory followed with well-written reports and the problems in the design 
of electrical apparatus, the student acquires a clearer conception of the 
facts and principles discussed in the classroom and also a working knowledge 
of the subject matter. All of this is essential if the student is to become a 
successful electrical engineer. 

In the course in electrical industry as a public utility, general economic 
considerations are applied to electric power, its generation, transmission, and 
use together with the selection of electrical and allied equipment from an 
economic standpoint: also a study and analysis is made of rate structures. 
This course and the course in business law are valuable inclusions in the 
electrical engineering curriculum for the student who is interested in taking 
up administrative work. 



the College op Engineering 



209 



Curriculum in Electrical Engineering 

(Communication Option ) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 200 



SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR 



Hrs. 

M. E. 11— Machine Shop 2 

M. E. 7— Welding and Heat Treat. 1 



E. E. 3— Intro. Elect. Eng'g. 



Hrs. 

2 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Phys. 105 — G. Physics 4 

Phys. 107 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 2 

Econ. 30 — Fund, of Economics ... 3 

Speech 11— Effective Spk 3 

M. E. 27— Mechanism 2 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Phys. 10G— G. Physics 4 

Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

E. E. 100— Elem. of Elect. 

Eng'g 4 

M. 101— Statics 3 



19 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



E. E. 230— D. C. Machinery 3 

E. E. 231— D. C. Mach. Lab 2 

E. E, 235— A. C. Theory 4 

Mathematics 253 3 

M. 102 — Strength of Materials ... 4 
M. E. 220— Heat & Power 

Eng'g 3 

G. 101— Eng'g. Society ] 



E. E. 237— Prin. of A. C. Mach. . . 4 

E. E. 244— Elect. Calc. & Design . . 3 

E. E, 250— Electronics 4 

E. E. 251 — Elect. Measure- 
ments Lab 1 

Mathematics 254 3 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

G. 102— Eng'g. Society % 



19V 2 
FOURTH YEAR 



18% 



E. E. 104i — Illumination 2 

E. E. 245— Electric Control 2 

E. E. 253 — Radio Eng'g 3 

E. E, 255— Radio Lab 3 

E. E. 260 — Elect. Communication . 3 

C. E. 115 — Fluid Mechanics 2 

Electives 3 

G. 103 — Eng'g. Society : 



E. E. 254— Radio Eng'g 3 

E. E. 256— Radio Lab 2 

E. E. 261— Elect. Communication . 3 
E, E. 270— Elect. Ind. as Pub. 

Utility 3 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 

Electives 3 

G. 104— Eng'g. Society % 



18% 
ELECTIVES 



17% 



E. E. 124— Thesis 2 to 5 

E. E. 247— Elect. Power 

Transmission 3 

E. E. 274— Ind. Appl. of Elect. 

Cont 3 

E. E. 280, 281— Elect. Prob 1 to 6 



E. E. 282— Symmetrical Comp. . . 3 

E, E. 283— Telephone Eng'g 3 

E. E. 286— Industrial Control 3 

Adv. Math, or Physics 3 to 6 

Mil. 105-108— Adv. Mil 1 to 6 



210 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Mechanical Engineering 

The purpose of the course in mechanical engineering is to give the student 
such mental equipment as will enable him to deal most effectively both 
technically and commercially with general engineering problems. All possible 
practice is given in the work that an engineer is ordinarily called on to do, 
but greater stress is laid on a thorough knowledge of those underlying funda- 
mental principles and methods which are the foundation of all engineering 
professions. To this is added a study of those economic subjects which are 
essential to a thorough understanding of sound business methods. 

The first and second years are devoted to those basic preparatory courses 
which are essential to the more technical courses which follow in the third 
and fourth years. This preparatory instruction supplies the requisite founda- 
tion in English, mathematics, chemistry, physics, statics, mechanism, drafting, 
and shop practice. 

Fundamental drafting-room procedure is taught in the first year and 
this is supplemented by shop work, beginning in the summer following the 
first year. This is planned to give a knowledge of the fundamental tools and 
of methods of production, which, when combined with the study of mechanism, 
machine design, and power-plant design in the second, third, and foilrth 
years, will enable the student to work out designs that are both practical in 
operation and economical to manufacture. 

The work in pure mathematics is terminated at the end of the second 
year, and applications follow in the recitation room courses in mechanism, 
statics, mechanics of materials, dynamics, and machine design. Power engi- 
neering begins with the course in thermodynamics in the third year and is 
continued by the courses in heat engines, internal combustion engines, and 
power plant design A sufficient amount of electrical engineering is given in the 
third and fourth years to enable the student to handle engineering operations 
involving the simple electrical problems, and additional courses are available 
as electives. 

The engineering laboratories provide the student with practice in testing, 
handling, and caring for a large variety of machinery, including steam, air, 
gas, hydraulic, material-testing, internal combustion, and power-transmission 
machinery. One-half day a week is devoted to this work during the last 
two years. 

Electives are provided in the fourth year which enable the student to 
specialize in the power field or in the industrial field in accordance with his 
natural inclination. Students interested in the power field pursue courses in 
steam turbines, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning. Students interested 
in the industrial field pursue courses in problems of organization and manage- 
ment of industries, motion and time study, and related subjects. 

The curriculum is broad, highly technical, and designed to meet the 
needs of young men interested in the scientific aspects of industry. The young 
graduate ordinarily enters a graduate apprenticeship in a public utility, 
manufacturing, or operating organization where opportunity is provided for 
his development in research, design, operation, sales, or administration, de- 
pending upon his interests and aptitudes and upon the opportunities available. 



The College op Engineering 



211 



Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 199. 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR 

Hrs. 

M. E. 15 — Welding, Forming, and Heat Treatment 2 

M. E. 11— Machine Work 2 

M. E, 12— Machine Work 1 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics. 105— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 2 

Chem. 10— Quant. Analysis : 2 

M. E. 29 — Mechanism 4 

M. E. 16— Prod. Control 2 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics. 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

M. 101— Statics 3 

M. E. 25— Elem. of Mach. Desn. . . 2 
Speech 13— Eff . Spk 2 



19 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



Econ. 103 — Econ. and Acct 3 

M. 102 — Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103 — Materials Test Lab 1 

E. E. 102— Elements of E. E 4 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics 3 



Bus. 110 — Acct. for Engs 2 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

E. E, 103— Elements of E. E 4 

M. E. 113 — Machine Design 4 

M. E. 105— Machine Constr 2 

M. E. 222— Heat Engines 3 



G. 101 — Engineering Society .... y 2 G. 102 — Engineering Soceity . 



17V 2 
FOURTH YEAR 



18% 



C. E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 3 

C. E. 122 — Structural Eng'g. or 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

Ch. E. 221— Metallurgy Lab 1 

M. E. 123— Eng'g. Lab 2 

M. E. 203 — Machine Design 4 

M. E. 223— Steam Pow. Plants . .'. 3 

G. 103 — Engineering Society V 2 

Electives — (see below) 3 

18% 



G. 110 — Business Law 3 

E. E, 274— Ind. App. of Elec. Cont. 3 

M. E. 227— Pow. Plant Design 2 

M. E. 228— Eng'g. Lab 2 

M. E. 229— Int. Comb. Engines 3 

G. 104 — Engineering Society y 2 

Inspection Trip 

Electives— (see below) 6 

19% 



ELECTIVES 



M. E. 106— Shop Methods 2 or 3 

M. E. 124--Thesis 2 to 4 

M. E. 205— Industrial Eng'g 3 

M. E. 224 — Steam Turbines 3 

M. E. 250— Heat. Vent. & Air 

Cond 3 



M. E. 270 — Industrial Lub 3 

Mil. 105-108— Adv. Military 

for Engineers 1 to 6 

E. E. 244— Elect. Cal. & Desn 3 

Ch. E. 211— Fuels and 

Combustion 2 to 3 



2l2 CJURRICULAR \i\:i}\ -ikkmi .\ :ts and COURSES OF 1 NSTiirc i m.\ 

FIVE YEAR CURRICULA 

For a description of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
and degrees in engineering, see page 200. 

THE SCHOOL OF MINES CURRICULA 1 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Engineering of Mines, with options in coal mining and in petroleum and 
natural gas engineering. 

2. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over five or 
more years leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of 
Science in Mining Engineering in the School of Mines. 

Mining Engineer 

Mining engineering deals with the processes and appliances used in the 
extraction of minerals from within the earth and their utilization. Not only 
must the mining engineer be thoroughly trained in mining and geology, but 
also in the application of the fundamental principles of civil, electrical, and 
mechanical engineering to mining conditions. 

The first two years of the course in mining engineering are devoted to a 
thorough training in the underlying principles of mathematics, geology, physics, 
and chemistry. Supplementing these are courses in surveying, including mine 
surveying, English, and drawing. For the last two years of the course two 
options are provided, one in coal mining and one in geology, oil, and gas 
engineering. The student is permitted to state his choice of option at the 
beginning of the third year. Summer employment is usually arranged for 
students desiring such work, and such summer work is encouraged. 

Coal Mining 

In the Coal Mining Option the study of coal mining is taken up in the 
third year. This study includes the geology and classification of coals; ex- 
plosives and blasting; prospecting; shaft sinking and tunneling; methods of 
working; haulage, hoisting, and pumping; and the preparation of coal for the 
market. A course in the projection of mine workings and the design of 
mining plants is offered throughout the fourth year. A course in the utilization 
of mining machinery, with particular reference to electrical equipment, is 
required in the senior year. A thorough course in mine gases and the venti- 
lation of mines is given in the first half of the fourth year, supplemented by 
work in the mining laboratory. The course in fuels is designed to give the 
student a knowledge of the various fuels that are utilized in engineering 
practice, while the courses in metallurgy acquaint him with the minerals and 
processes used in manufacture of iron and steel. The course in mine man- 
agement presents the economic, social, governmental, labor, and financial 
consideration to be met in the successful management of a mining enterprise. 

The study of steam engineering begins with the course in heat and power 
engineering. Thorough groundwork in engineering principles is acquired in 
the five mechanical courses. 



1 The freshman year of these curricula is common with the freshman year in the 
College of Engineering. This provision permits a student to postpone a choice of 
curricula until after a year of college work. 



The School of Mines 



21.1 



Practice in the handling and care of instruments and machinery and in 
the solution of practical engineering problems is offered in the mechanical 
laboratory. These courses are followed by courses in electrical engineering 
and structural engineering. 

Training in the science of geology is offered by the course in mineralogy 
and general geology. These courses may be supplemented by the study of 
the economic geology of the non-metallic minerals in the fourth year, npecial 
attention being paid to the geology of coal, oil, and gas. Should the student 
desire further work in geology a course in fluid geology is offered as an 
elective subject. 

The courses in economics and business law furnish the fundamental 
business training so essential for the engineer. 

Local coal fields and mining operations are utilized extensively for in- 
struction and field work. 

Curriculum in Mining Engineering 

(COAL-MINING OPTION) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines 

FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 200 

SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 2 

E. M. 100— Mine Surveying 2 

E. M. 106— Mineralogy 2 

Geol. 1 — General Geology 3 

Geol. 2 — General Geology Lab. ... 1 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

Chem. 6 — Quant. Analysis 3 

E. M. 101 — Mines Surveying 2 

M. 101— Statics 3 



19 
E. M. 102s — Summer Mine Surveying (five weeks) 



19 
5 



THIRD YEAR 



E. E. 102— Elements of E. E 4 

C. E. 110— Structural Drafting ... 2 

M. 102 — Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103— Materials Test. Lab 1 

E. M. Ill— Mining 2 

E. M. 107— Mining Methods 4 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 



F. E. 103— Elements of E. E 4 

E. M. 202— Coal Lab 1 

Speech 13 — Effective Spkg 2 

E. M. 212— Coal Mining 4 

C. E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 3 

M. E. 220— Heat & Pow. 

Eng'g 3 



G. 101 — Engineering Society y 2 G. 102 — Engineering Society 



% 



19% 

FOURTH YEAR 



17% 



Econ. 103 — Econ. and Acct 3 

C. E. 122— Structural Eng'g 3 

E. M. 115 — Mine Design 2 

E. M. 213— Mine Ventilation 3 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

G. 103 — Engineering Society % 

Electives — (see below) 3 

Inspection Trip 



G. 110 — Business Law 3 

Bus. 110— Prin. of Acct 2 

E. M. 114 — Mine Management .... 2 

E. M. 116— Mine Design 3 

E. M. 118— Coal Preparation 3 

E. M. 119— Mine Equip. & Mach. . . 2 
G. 104— Engineering Society V 2 



Electives — (see below) 3 



17 y 2 



i8y 2 



214 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

ELECTIVES IN THE COAL-MINING OPTION 

E. M. 117— Indus. Safety Eng'g. . . 3 M. E. 207— Industrial Eng'g 3 

E. M. 120 — Thesis 2 to 4 Geol. Ill— Economic Geol. . . .3 or 4 

E. M. 203 — Geol. Survey 3 Geol. 3 — Historical Geol 3 

Ch. E. 211— Fuels 3 Geol. 4— Hist. Geol. Lab 1 

Ch. E. 222 — Non. Fer. Met 2 Geol. 108 — Nat. Resources and 

E. E. 274 — Industrial Applications Geology of West Va 2 or 3 

of Electricity 3 Mil. 105-108— Adv. Military ... 1 to G 

C. E. 206— Concrete Const 3 

Geological, Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering 

This option is planned to meet the needs of the engineer who is more 
interested in the geological aspect of mining than in the actual operation of 
a mining property and particularly for the student interested in the fields 
of natural gas and petroleum engineering. There is a growing demand for the 
so-called mining geologist who, while he has had a thorough training in the 
fundamentals of engineering in general and of mining engineering in par- 
ticular, yet is specially qualified to work out the detailed geological features 
of mining properties and to make reports on them. This is particularly true 
in the case of oil and gas companies, where accurate knowledge in advance 
of actual drilling operations is of the greatest importance in the economical 
development of the field. Besides the opportunities offered by mining com- 
panies, many of our railroads maintain a corps of geologists while the several 
states and the federal government are continually carrying on geological 
investigations. This course also offers an excellent preparation for those who 
propose to do graduate work. 

Particular emphasis is placed on the development, production, distribu- 
tion, and utilization of natural gas and petroleum. This is an engineering 
field essential to modern industry offering many opportunities for the tech- 
nically trained student. Local production fields, compressor stations, and 
refineries coupled with new equipment facilities offer many unique advan- 
tages in this field of engineering. 

In the third year the course differs from the coal-mining option in that 
organic chemistry, petroleum, natural gas, and geological courses are substi- 
tuted for the courses in coal mining. A course in field geology in which the 
student prepares a geological map and a complete report on an assigned area 
enables him to apply the geological knowledge received in various courses. 
The fundamentals of mining and metallurgy are studied in the third year 
as well. The study of oil and gas geology treats of the origin, properties, 
distribution, and mode of accumulation of oil and gas, and familiarizes the 
student with all the available sources of information on this subject. The 
courses in oil and gas production and oil refining deal with the subjects of 
the chemical and physical properties of petroleum and natural gas, their 
extraction and subsequent treatment, the valuation of oil and gas properties, 
reports on them, and the actual testing in the laboratory of various oils, oil 
shales, and natural gas. The problems of natural gas measurement and distri- 
bution are particularly stressed. 

A thorough grounding in the fundamentals of business is afforded by 
the courses in economics, accounting, and business law. 



The School of Mines 



215 



Curriculum in Mining Engineering 

(PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS OPTION) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines 

FIRST YEAR: See Curriculum on page 200 

SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105 — G. Physics 4 

Physics 107 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3— Military Science 2 

E. M. 100 — Mine Surveying 2 

E. M. 106— Mineralogy 2 

Geol. 1— General Geol 3 

Geol. 2— Gen. Geol. Lab 1 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108 — G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 2 

Chem. 6 — Quant. Analysis 3 

E. M. 101 — Mine Surveying 2 

M. 101— Statics 3 



19 

E. M. 10*s — Summer Mine Surveying (five weeks) 

THIRD YEAR 



19 

5 



Chem. 233— Organic Chem 5 

Geol. 3 — Historical Geol 3 

Geol. 4— Hist. Geol. Lab 1 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103— Materials Test. Lab 1 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

E. M. 201— Oil Field Develop- 
ment 2 



» I. E. 220— Heat & Pow. Eng'g. .. 3 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

Speech 13 — Effective Speak- 
ing 2 

Geol. 161— Field Geol 3 

Ch. E. 101— Oil Lab 1 

C. E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 3 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 



G. 101 — Engineering Society y 2 G. 102 — Engineering Society 



% 



isy 2 

FOURTH YEAR 



isy 2 



Econ. 103 — Econ. and 

Accounting 3 

Ch. E. 211— Fnels 3 

Ch. E. 212— Oil Refining 2 

Geol. 205— Structural Geol 3 

E. E. 110— Elements of E. E 5 

G. 103 — Engineering Society y 2 

Electives — (see below) 2 



Bus. 110 — Prin. of Accounting 2 

Geol. 211— Econ. Geol. of Coal, 

Oil, and Gas 3 

E. M. 203 — Geol. Surveying 2 

E. M. 204— Oil & Gas Prod 4 

E. M. 205— Gas Meas. Eng'g 2 

G. 104 — Engineering Society % 

Inspection Trip 

Electives — (see below) 4 



18^ 17V 2 

ELECTIVES IN THE PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS OPTION 

E. M. 117— Indus. Safety Eng'g. . . 3 C. E. 206— Concrete Constr 3 

E. M. 212— Coal Mining 4 M. E. 207— Industrial Eng'g 3 

E. M. 120— Thesis 2 to 4 Geol. Ill— Economic Geology 

Geol. 108 — Natural Resources & (Non-metallic) 3 

Geology of West Virginia 2 or 3 Chem. 238, 260 3 to 5 

Mil. 105-108— Adv. Military . .1 to 6 M. E. 229— Int. Comb. Engines 2 



216 Cureicular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

FIVE-YEAR CURRICULA 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in conjunction with Degrees in 
Engineering and in Mining Engineering 
These curricula are designed to meet the needs of students who wish 
a broader training in liberal-aits subjects than is provided in a four-year 
curriculum. 
(A) Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 

Subject Hours 

The requirements in the first three years of any four-year 

engineering curriculum 1 II62 to 1192 

Additional economics (group requirements of 6 hours) 1 to 3 

One foreign language 12 

Elective from one of the following groups: 6 

(1) English, journalism, speech; (2*) foreign 
language; (3) history; (4) political science; (5) philoso- 
phy and sociology; (6) business administration. 



Total 1362 to 1402 

(B) Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering or Engi- 
neering of Mines to be conferred upon completion of the fifth year: 
The work outlined for the fourth year in the department in 

which the first degree was taken 37 to 33 

Total for five years 173- to 175- 

THE TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Certificate as Electronic and Radio Technician 
Students who may wish to acquire technical training in the field of radio, 
electronics, and communication, but who do not care to meet all the require- 
ments for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, may 
register for the two-year curriculum for the certificate as Electronics and 
Radio Technician. 

This curriculum has been developed to give the student fundamental 
training in the application of electricity and allied subjects to prepare him 
for installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of radio and electronic 
equipment. 

The requirements for entrance are the same as for the regular four-year 
courses. A total of 76 hours' credit plus the regular University req.uireme.its 
in military and physical education are required for completion of this course. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 1— Comp. & Rhet 3 Eng. 2— Comp. & Rhet 3 

Math. 3— College Algebra 3 Phys. 2— General Physics 3 

Math. 4 — Plane Trigonometry .... 3 Phys. 4 — General Phys. Lab 1 

Phys. 1 — General Physics 3 Phys. 114 — Intro. Radio-Tele, and 

Phys. 3 — General Phys. Lab 1 Radio-Telephony 3 

Phys. 113— Introductory Radio ... 3 M. E. 7— Heat Treat. & Welding . . 1 

E. E. 50— Prin. Elect. Tubes & 



16 



Cir 3 

M. E. 11— Machine Shop 2 



16 



Till; Cul.l.HiL OF ENGINEERING 217 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR 

Econ. Is and 2s — Principles of Econ 4 

E. E. 51 — Radio Receivers 4 

E. E. 52 — Princ. and Practice of Communications 4 

12 
SECOND YEAR 

M. E. 20 — Mechanical Draw 3 Chem. 2 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Bus. 5 — Accounting 3 Eus. 127 — Salesmanship 2 

Chem. 1— Inorganic Chem 4 E. E. 110— Elem. of E. E 5 

E. E. 53— Prop. & Antenna Sys. .3 E. E. 55— Operation & Maint. of 

E. E. 54— Radio Servicing 3 Radio Trans 5 

16 16 

GRADUATE CURRICULA 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Science in Engineering 
is offered in all departments. In certain departments courses leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy are also offered. The student who plans to 
pursue graduate work is directed to the courses as outlined in the Graduate 
School section of the University catalogue. 

SPECIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

1. Elective Groups for Students in Other Colleges. Candidates for de- 
grees other than engineering degrees and special students in any department 
of the University are permitted to elect subjects in the College of Engineering 
and the School of Mines, provided, in each case, they have had the subjects 
specified as prerequisites. Students who wish to take a general classical or 
scientific course of study before taking the engineering curriculum are 
advised to carry their mathematics as far as called for by the engineering cur- 
riculum, and to take some of their elective work in the College of Engineering. 

Credits are given in the College of Arts and Sciences for the following 
engineering courses: Ch. E. 101, 202, 205, 206, 210, 220, and 221; C. E. 1, 2, 
3, 110, and 115; E. E. 100, 101, 102, 103, 200, 201, 202, 203, 205, and 206; 
E. M. lOf., 201, 202, 203. and 2'04; M. 101, 102. 103, 104; M. E. 20, 25, 26, 29, 
221, and 222. 

In addition the student may elect with the consent of his adviser, when 
his major subject is physics or if he is enrolled in the College of Education: 
M. E. 10 to 16 and 105 to 107; Ch. E. 112s. 

2. Partial Curriculum. Students who have not the time or are other- 
wise unable to take full curriculum will be allowed to take a special or partial 
curriculum, consisting of such studies as they are prepared to take, provided 
such curriculum shall have been approved by the adviser. For further infor- 
mation see statement of requirements for admission as special students. 



students maintaining an honor-point average of 1.5 or over may be granted separ- 
ately the Bachelor of Science degree ; otherwise the conferring of this degree will be 
deferred until the student has satisfied the requirements of the engineering degree. 

2 These figures include the present University requirements for 8 hours in military 
science and 2 hours in physical education. 



218 CJurricular Requirements and Courses of Enstruction 

COURSES IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

NOTE: Courses marked by an asterisk (*) may be taken as undergraduate 
work in colleger other than the College of Engineering. 

Aeronautical Engineering and Aviation 

Assistant Professor WOOLARD and Flight Instructor Henry 

A.E. 15. Aircraft Repair and Maintenance. I, II. S. 2 Hrs. PR: Enrollment in 
Aeronautical Engineering. Splicing of wind spars, ribs, stringers, 
care and replacement of airplane fabrics and finishes. Repair and 
maintenance of engines, carburetors, magnetos, propellers, and air- 
craft accessories. Mr. Henry 

A.E. 16. Elementary Aerodynamics. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Math. 108 (or registra- 
tion in Math. 108) and Physics 105 and 107. Fundamentals of aero- 
dynamics as applied to the airplane and propeller. Staff 
*A.E. 101. Flight Training I, II, S. 1 Hr. PR: A.E. 120 or registration in A.E. 120. 
Beginning flight instruction and training consisting of 20 hours 
of flight time. The student will have approximately 12 hours of 
dual and 8 hours of solo flying in this course. Special flight fee 
$100, payable at registration. Mr. Henry 

A.E. 102. Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 Hr. PR: A.E. 101. Continuation of A.E. 
101, consisting of 20 hours' flight time. This course, together with 
A.E. 101, will enable a student to obtain the required flight time 
and necessary experience to prepare him for a C.A.A. private 
pilot's examination. Special flight fee of $100, payable at regis- 
tration. Mr. Henry 

A.E. 124. Thesis. 2 to 5 hours. Staff 

A.E. 202. Aerodynamics. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Math. 253, A.E. 16 and registration 
in C.E. 115. Continuation of A.E. 16, but more advanced. 

Mr. Woolard 

A.E. 203. cnordwise and Spanwise Air-load Distribution. II. 3 Hrs. PR: A.E. 
202. Calculation of air loads on wings and tail surfaces. Mr. Woolard 

A.E. 204. Airplane Performance. I. 2 Hrs. PR: A.E. 222, A.E. 202. Detailed 
study of airplane performance. Mr 

A.E. 205. Experimental Aerodynamics. I. 2 Hrs. PR: A.E. 202. Study of ex- 
perimental methods and equipment. Laboratory calibration of 
equipment and wind-tunnel tests. Lecture and laboratory. 

Mr. Woolard 

A.E. 210. Basic Airplane Structures. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. 102 and M. 103. 
Analysis of the truss-type airplane structure and components. Brief 
introduction to stressed skin structures. Mr 

A.E. 211. Structural Design of Metal Airplanes. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: A.E. 210 or 
C.E. 122. Structural analysis of metal airplanes of the monocoque 

and semi-monocoque type. Mr 

A.E. 212. Airplane Design. II. 3 Hrs. PR: A.E. 202 and A.E. 211. Preliminary 
aerodynamic and structural design of an airplane. Study of the 
C.A.A. Airplane Airworthiness Requirements. Staff 

A.E. 213. Airplane Structures Laboratory. II. 1 Hr. PR: A.E. 211. Mr 



Tin-: College of Lncinkekinu 219 

A.E. 221. Aircraft Power Plants. I. 3 His. PR: M.E. 221. Construction and 
operating characteristics of aircraft engines, jet and rocket pro- 
pulsion, and aircraft fuels. Mr. 

A.E. 222. Aircraft Propulsion. II. 2 Hrs. PR: A.E. 16 and M. 102. Fixed-pitch 
and constant-speed propellers; jet and rocket propulsion. 

Mr Woolard 

A.E. 223. Aircraft Power-plant Design. II. 3 Hrs. PR: A.E. 221. Layout of a 
complete engine; detailed design of component parts. Mr. 

A.E. 225. Aircraft-engine Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. PR: A.E. 221 Mr 

A.E. 241. Air Navigation. I. II 2 Hrs. PR: A.E. 120. Dead reckoning; celestial 
and radio navigation. Mr. 

Supplemental Aviation Courses 

*A.E. 120. Aviation Ground School. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Nomenclature of aircraft, 
civil air regulations, navigation, meteorology, and aircraft engines. 

Staff 

*A.E. 121. Advanced Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 Hr's. credit for 20 hours of 
flight time. PR: A.E. 102. Advanced flight training in light air- 
planes. Special flight fee for 20 Hrs'. flight $100 

($100 payable at registration.) 

*A.E. 122. Advanced Aviation Ground School. I, II. 5 Hrs. Preparation for 
written examination for commercial pilot's certificate. Mr. Woolard 

*A.E. 123. Advanced Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 Hr. Credit for each 20 hours of 
flight time. PR: A.E. 102. Similar to A.E. 121 except that the flight 
training is given in a heavier type of airplane. 

Special flight fee for 20 hrs'. flight $180 

($90 payable at registration and the balance pay- 
able after completion of 10 hours' flight time.) Mr. Henry 

Chemical, Metallurgical, and Ceramic Engineering 

Professor Koehler; Associate Professor Simons; Assistant Professors Fairbanks 
and Holden; Instructors Bartkus and .Jones 

UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 
•101. Oil Laboratory. II. 1 Hr. Primarily for students taking the Petroleum 
and Natural Gas Option. PR: Chemistry 6 or 107. Mr. Koehler 

102. . Blow-pipe Analysis and Assaying. II. 2 Hrs. Laboratory and recitations. 
PR: Chemistry 6 or 107, Mr. Bartkus 

105. Chemical Engineering Design. II. 2 Hrs. PR: M.E. 20; PR or concur- 
rent, M. 102 and Ch. E. 205. Mr. Simons 
109. Chemical Engineering Economics. I. 2 Hrs. The economic principles 
applied to layout, location, design, and operation of plants devoted to 
the production of industrial chemicals. PR: Econ. 30 and Chemistry 15. 

Mr. Koehler 
*110s. Practical Pottery. SI, S2. 2 Hrs. Fundamentals of clay working. 

Mr. Koehler and Mr. Jones 
124. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 5 Hrs. Some problem in chemical engineering or in- 
dustrial chemistry is selected for investigation. A carefully prepared 
report is required. Open only to qualified seniors. Staff 



220 Curriculae Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

201. Unit Organic Processes. II. 3 Hrs. Unit processes involved in the manu- 
facture of commercial products from organic raw materials, petroleum, 
benzene and related compounds; intermediates, dyes, drugs, and ex- 
plosives. PR: Chemistry 233 and Ch. E. 205. Mr. Simons 
*202. Water Examination and Purification. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 10 or 107. 

Staff 

203. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 204 and 
208. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Holden 

204. Chemical Engineering Calculations. I. 2 Hrs. Industrial stoichiometry; 
calculations involved in the unit operations and processes of the chemi- 
cal engineering industries. PR: Chemistry 261 and M. E. 220. 

Mr. Koehler and Mr. Holden 
*205. Elements of Chemical Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. PR or concurrent: Chem- 
istry 260. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Holden 
*206. Engineering Chemistry Laboratory. I. 1 Hr. Technological tests and 
analyses of boiler waters, cements and paints. PR: Chemistry 107. 

Mr. Holden 

207. Principles of Chemical Engineering. I. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Ch. E. 205; 
also PR or concurrent: Ch. E. 204. Mr. Simons 

208. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. I, II. 2 Hrs. Unit operations of the 
chemical engineering industries. PR: Ch. E. 205; PR or concurrent: 
C. E. 115. Mr. Simons and Mr. Holden 

209. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. I, II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Ch. E. 
208, involving study of the more difficult unit operations. 

Mr. Simons and Mr. Holden 

*210. Electrochemical Industries. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 4, and PR 

or concurrent: E. E. 110 or Chemistry 260. Mr. Koehler 

211. Fuels and Combustion. I. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 6, 10, or 107 and 
M. E. 122 or M. E. 220. Mr. Koehler 

212. Oil-refining Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 233 and Ch. E. 101. 

Mr. Simons 

213. Principles of Gas and Fuel Engineering. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 211. 

Mr. Koehler 

214. Inorganic Chemical Technology. I. 2 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 205 and M. E. 220. 

Mr. Koehler 

215. Organic Chemical Technology. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 201 and Ch. E. 205. 

Mr. Simons 

216. Chemical Engineering Design. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 105 and Ch. E. 208. 

Mr. Simons 
219. Principles of Chemical Engineering. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Ch. E. 207. 

Mr. Simons 
-220. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. I. 2 Hrs. PR: Chem. 6, 10 or 107. 

Mr. Bartkus 
*221. Metallurgy Laboratory. I. 1 Hr. Preparation and microscopical exami- 
nation of specimens of iron and steel; analytical determinations; 
photomicrographs; to accompany Ch. E. 220. Mr. Bartkus 

222. Metallurgy, Non-ferrous. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 6, 10 or 15. 

Mr. Bartkus 



The College of Engineering 221 

223. Metallography. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Phase-rule diagrams of alloy systems. 
Photomicrographs of metals and alloys. PR: Ch. E. 220, 221, 222, and 
Chemistry 260. Mr. Bartkus 

227. Aircraft Structural Materials. I. 2 Hrs. PR: A. E. 211. Heavy and light 
alloys, plastics, fabrics, woods, and other major materials used in the 
production of aircraft. Mr. Bartkus 

230. Ceramics. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. A review of the ceramic industries. Chemical 
and engineering principles applied in the manufacture of ceramic 
materials. PR: Chemistry 6 or 107. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Jones 

231. Advanced Ceramics Laboratory, 1. 2 Hrs. Preparation of bodies, glazes, 
enamels, and glass. Biscuit and glost firing. Coloring agents. Factory 
control tests. PR: Ch. E. 230. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Jones 

232. Refractories. I, II. 2 Hrs. Manufacture, properties, and use of refractory 
materials. Standard tests. Study of phase diagrams of refractory ma- 
terials. PR: Chemistry 6 or 107 and Chemistry 260. Mr. Koehler 

233. Glass. I, II. 2 Hrs. Physical and chemical properties of glass. Methods 
of analysis of glass and of raw materials. Theory and practice of manu- 
facture. PR or concurrent: Chemistry 260. Mr. Koehler 

235s. Practical Pottery. SI. 2 Hrs. A continuation of 110s. 

Mr. Koehler and Mr. Jones 
*236s. Pottery and Ceramic Art. S2. 2 Hrs. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Jones 

GRADUATE DIVISION 

300. Seminar. SI. I, II. 1 to 6 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. Staff 

304, 305, 306, 307. Advanced Unit Operations. I, II, S. 2 to 5 Hrs. per 
semester. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Simons 

323, 324. Advanced Unit Processes. I, II, S. 2 to 5 Hrs. per semester. 

Mr. Simons 

353. Transformation in Silicates. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 230 Mr. Koehler 

354. Advanced Fuel Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Ch. E. 213. Mr. Koehler 
372. Advanced Chemical Engineering Design. I, II, S. 2 to 5 Hrs. Mr. Simons 
397, 398. Research. I, II. Credit to be arranged. A suitable problem in chem- 
ical engineering, metallurgy, or ceramics is selected for investigation. 
PR: Ch. E. 207 and 208. Mr. Koehler and Staff 

Civil Engineering 

Professors Davis, Downs, and Speiden; Associate Professor Baker; Instructors 
Burchinal, Simmons, and Stephens 

UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 

*1. Surveying. I, II. 2 Hrs. Elementary surveying and spherical trigonometry. 
Primarily for freshmen. PR: Math. 4. Mr. Baker and Mr. Burchinal 

*2. Surveying. I. 4 Hrs. PR: C. E. 1 and Math. 4. Mr. Baker 

*3. Railroad Curves. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of C. E. 2. Mr. Baker 

4s. Summer Surveying. SI (5 weeks). 5 Hrs. PR: C. E. 3. Mr. Baker 

*5. Land Surveying. I. 4 Hrs. Primarily for forestry students. PR: Math. 10. 

Mr. Baker 

*6. Topographic Mapping. II. 2 Hrs. Primarily for forestry students. PR: 

C. E. 5. Mr. Baker 



222 Currioulak Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



101. Elements of Highway Engineering. I, TI. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 4s. 

Mr. Downs 

102. Railway Engineering. IT. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 4s. Mr. Downs 

103. Highway Design. I. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 101. Mr. Downs 
►110. Structural Drafting. I. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 20 and registration in M. 101. 

Mr. Speiden 

;: 115. Fluid Mechanics. I, 'II. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR: M. 102 or 104 (or registration 

in M. 102 or 104). Mr. Speiden 

116. Water Supply Engineering. I. 4 Hrs. PR: C. E. 115. Mr. Speiden 

117. Municipal Engineering. I. 2 Hrs. PR: C. E. 115. Mr. Speiden 

118. Sewerage. II. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 115. Mr. Speiden 

120. Materials of Construction. I. 2 Hrs. PR: M. 102. Mr. Downs 

121. Structural Engineering. II. 4 Hrs. PR: M. 102. Mr. Davis 

122. Structural Engineering. I. 2 or 3 Hrs. PR: M. 102. Mr. Davis 

123. Bridge Design. I. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 121. Mr. Davis 

124. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 4 Hrs. Special design, investigation, or original re- 
search of some assigned topic relating to civil engineering . Staff 

180. Civil Problems. I, II. S. 1 to 4 Hrs. Staff 

200. Water-Power Engineering. II. 2 Hrs. PR: C. E. 115. Mr. Speiden 

201. Hydraulic Measurements. I, II. 1 Hr. PR: C. E. 115. Mr. Speiden 

202. Water Purification. I. 3 or 4 Hrs PR: registration in C. E. 116. 

Mr. Speiden 

203. Sewage Disposal. II. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 115. Mr. Speiden 

204. Advanced Structures. II. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 121. Mr. Davis 

206. Reinforced Concrete. II. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E 121. Mr. Davis 

207. Foundations. I. 3 Hrs. PR: C. E. 121. Mr. Davis 

208. Transportation Economics. I or II. 2 Hrs. PR: Registration in C. E. 102. 

Mr. Downs 

209. Highway Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. PR: M. 103. Mr. Downs 

210. Photogrammetry. I. 2 Hrs. PR: C. E. 4s. Mr. Baker 

211. Photography Mapping. I. 2 Hrs. PR: C. E. 1 and A. E. 120. Cameras; photo- 
graphic missions; distortion, interpretation, and mapping methods. 
Primarily for seniors in Aeronautical Engineering. Mr. Baker 

280. Civil Problems. I, II. S. 1 to 4 Hrs. Staff 

GRADUATE DIVISION 

351. Advanced Water-Supply Engineering. I, II. Credit to be arranged. PR: 
C. E. 116. Mr. Speiden 

352. Sewerage and Sewage Disposal. I, II. 'Credit to be arranged. PR: C. E. 
118. Mr. Speiden 

353. Advanced Design Problems. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Speiden 

354. Statically Indeterminate Structures. I, II. Credit to be arranged. PR: 
C. E. 204. Mr. Davis 

355. Soils Mechanics. I, II. Credit to be arranged. Staff 
397, 398. Research. I, II. Credit to be arranged. Mr. Davis and Mr. Speiden 



The College of Engineering 223 

Electrical Engineering 

Professors Forman and Hall; Associate Professors E. C. Jones and Seibert; 
Assistant Professor Reed; Instructor Keener 

UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 

3. Introductory Electrical Engineering. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Mr. Seibert 

*50. Principles of Electron Tubes and Circuits. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Phys. 113. 
Theory and applications of electron tubes and associated circuits. 

Mr. Seibert 

*51. Radio Receivers. S. 4 Hrs. PR: E. E. 50. Theory and analysis of ampli- 
tude and frequency modulated receivers. Television receivers. With 
laboratory work. Mr. Seibert 

*52. Principles and Practice of Communications. S. 4 Hrs. PR: E. E, 50. 
Lecture, recitation, and laboratory for radio and electronic techni- 
cians. Mr. Seibert 

*53. Propagation and Antenna Systems. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 52. Lecture, reci- 
tation, and laboratory for radio and electronic technicians. Mr. Seibert 

*54. Radio Servicing. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 51. Lecture, recitation, and laboratory 
for radio and electronic technicians. Mr. Seibert 

*55. Operation and Maintenance of Radio Transmitters. II. 5 Hrs. PR: E. E. 
53. Lecture, recitation, and laboratory. Credit for this course contingent 
on student passing Federal Communication Commission's radio tele- 
phone operator license examination. Mr. Seibert 
MOO. Elements of Electrical Engineering. II. 4 Hrs. Primarily for sophomores 
in electrical engineering. PR: Math. 108 (or registration in Math. 108); 
Physics 106 (or registration in Physics 106). Mr. Reed and Mr. Keener 
:: 102, *103. Elements of Electrical Engineering. I and II respectively. 4 Hrs. 
each semester. For students in mechanical and mining engineering. 

Mr. Hall and Mr. Reed 

104. Illumination. I, II. 2 His. PR: Physics 106. Mr. Forman 

110. Elements of Electrical Engineering. I, II. 5 Hrs. PR: Physics 106. For 
students in .chemical, civil, and petroleum and natural gas option in 
mining engineering. Mr. Hall and Mr. Jones 

124. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 5 Hrs. Special investigation or original research on 
some topic relating to electrical engineering. Mr. Forman and Mr. Hall 

180, 181. Electrical Problems. I and II respectively. Credit to be arranged. 
For sophomores and juniors. Staff 

230. Direct-Current Machinery. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 100. 

Mr. Jones and Mr. Reed 

231. Direct-Current Machinery Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. To accompany E. E. 230. 

Mr. Jones and Mr. Reed 
235. Alternating-Current Theory and Measurement. I. 4 Hrs. PR: E. E. 100. 

Mr. Forman and Mr. Jones 

237. Principles of Alternating-Current Machinery. II. 4 Hrs. PR: E. E, 102 

or E, E. 235. Mr. Jones 

239, 240. Alternating-Current Machinery. I and II respectively. 3 Hrs. each 

semester. PR: E. E. 237 accompanied by E. E. 241. Mr. Forman 

241. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. To accompany E. E. 239. 

Mr. Reed 



224 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

242. Advanced Electrical Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. PR: E. E. 241. Advanced and 
special laboratory problems. Mr. Jones 

244. Electrical Calculations and Design. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 102 or 230 and 
237 (or registration in E. E. 237). Mr. Jones 

245. Electric Control. I. 2 Hrs. PR: E. E. 237. Mr. Jones 
247. Electrical Power Transmission. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 237 or 103. Mr. Hall 

250. Electronics. II. 4 Hrs. B. K. 235. Theory of electronic devices, their char- 
acteristics, and application. Mr. Seibert and Mr. Keener 

251. Electrical Measurements Laboratory. II. 1 Hr. To accompany E. E. 250 
for communication majors. Mr. Seibert 

253. Radio Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 250. Mr. Seibert 

254. Radio Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 253. Mr. Seibert 

255. Radio Laboratory. I. 3 Hrs. To accompany E. E. 253. Mr. Seibert 

256. Radio Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. To accompany E. E. 254. Mr. Seibert 

257. Aircraft Electrical Systems. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 103. Remote indication 
control, heating, ignition, starting, and instruments. Mr. Seibert 

258. Aircraft Radio. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 103. Communications, navigation, 
blind landing, and absolute altimeter. Mr. Seibert 

260. Electrical Communications. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Math. 240 or 253. 

Mr. Forman 

261. Electrical Communications. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 260. Mr. Forman 
270. The Electrical Industry as a Public Utility. II. 3 Hrs. For seniors and 

graduates only. Economic principles involved in the selection and design 

of electrical equipment and in the utilization of electrical energy. 

Mr. Hall 
274. Industrial Applications of Electric Control. I, II. 3 Hrs. For seniors or 

graduate students. Mr. Hall 

280, 281. Electrical Problems. I and II respectively. Credit to be arranged. 

For junior, senior, and graduate students. Staff 

282. Symmetrical Components. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 239. Mr. Forman 

283. Telephone Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 235. Mr. Forman 
110. Business Law. I, II. 3 Hrs. General principles of business law. The law 

Mr. Forma 71 and Committee 

284. Transients. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 235. Mr. Forman 

285. Electric Power Transmission and Distribution. I. II. 3 Hrs. Advanced 
theory and calculation of transmission lines and networks. PR: E. E. 
247. Mr. Hall 

286. Industrial Control. II. 3 Hrs. PR: E. E. 245. Electrical control devices 
in industry, their application and use in the protection and control of 
electrical and mechanical equipment. Mr. Jones 

GRADUATE DIVISION 

397, 398. Research. I, II. Credit to be arranged. Advanced research or special 
investigations on some topic related to electrical engineering. 

Mr. Forman or Mr. Hall 



Tn i College of Engineering 225 

General 

Professors Forman and Boomslitek 
UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 
1. Engineering Lectures. I. (No credit). Required of all freshmen in en- 
gineering. A series of lectures designed to acquaint the engineering 
student at the beginning of his course with the profession he has chosen. 

Mr. Boomsliter 

101. Engineering Society. I, II. y 2 Hr. Primarily for juniors. Required of all 
candidates for degrees in engineering. Membership, attendance, and 
active participation in Engineering Society. Mr. Forman and Committee 

102. Engineering Society. I, II. y 2 Hr. Continuation of G. 101. For juniors. 

Mr. Forman and Committee 

103. Engineering Society. I, II. y 2 Hr. For seniors. Continuation of G. 101 
and 102. Mr. Forman and Committee 

104. Engineering Society. I, II. y 2 Hr. Continuation of G. 103. For seniors. 

Mr. Forman and Committee 

110. Business L^w. I, II. 3 Hrs. General principles of business law. The law of 

contracts. Standard contract forms. PR: Economics 103, 30, or 1 and 2. 

and M. 10Z. .Mr. Boomsliter 

Mechanical Engineering 

DRAWING, MACHINE CONSTRUCTION, POWER ENGINEERING, MACHINE 
DESIGN, AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Professor II. M. Cather; Associate Professor Grow; Assistant Professor Reynolds; 
instructors Delaney, L. E. .Tones, Martin, Murphy, Pierce, Runner and Wasemann 

UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 
*7. Welding and Heat Treatment. I, II. S. 1 Hr. Mr. Jones and Mr. Martin 

*10. Pipefitting. I, II. 1 Hr. Mr. Martin and Mr. Runner 

•11. Machine Work, I, II. S. 2 Hrs. Mr. Janes, Mr. Martin, and Mr. Delaney 

*12. Machine Work. I, II. S. 1 Hr. Continuation of M. E. 11, which is a pre- 
requisite. Mr. Jones, Mr. Martin, and Mr. Delaney 
*15. Welding, Forming, and Heat Treatment. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Molding and casting 
of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, oxy-acetylene welding, electric weld- 
ing, resistance welding of plates, pipe, tubing, etc. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and shop practice. Mr. Martin and Mr. Jones 
16. Production Control. I. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 11. The economic use of machine 
tools, planning assembly line manufacture, gauging, and inspection 
during the various processes of manufacture. Mr. Jones 
*20. Mechanical Drawing. I, II. 3 Hrs. Staff 
21s. Mechanical Drawing. SI. 2 Hrs. The use and care of drawing instru- 
ments, freehand sketching, and lettering. This course is intended for 
those who are teaching manual training in public schools. Mr. Cather 
25. Elements of Machine Design. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 11 and M. E. 20. 
Empirical design, standard commercial parts; i.e., bearings, shafting, 
couplings, pulleys, keys, screw fittings, limits, tolerances and allowances, 
nomenclature. Staff 
*26. Descriptive Geometry. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. E. 20 and solid geometry. 

Staff 



226 Curricular Requirements and Courses of [nstruction 

27. Mechanism. I, II. 2 Hrs. Lectures, recitations, and graphical solutions. 

PR: M. E. 20 and 26. Staff 

*29. Mechanism. I, II. 4 Hrs. Lectures, recitations, and graphical solutions. 

PR: M. E. 20 and 26. Staff 

*105. Machine Construction. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 12. Two three-hour periods. 

Mr. Jones and Mr. Martin 

-106. Shop Methods. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Continuation of M. E. 105. Two three-hour 

periods. Mr. Jones 

*107. Machine Construction. Semester and credit to be arranged. Advanced 

work for special students. Continuation of M. E. 105 and 106. Mr. Jones 

113. Machine Design. I. II. 4 Hrs. PR: M. 102 and M. E. 29. Two lectures and 

recitations and two three-hour computation periods. Mr. Pierce 

122. Mechanical Laboratory. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 221 or registration in 

M. E. 221. Mr. Cather and Mr. Reynolds 

123. Engineering Laboratory. 1. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 122. Mr. Reynolds 

124. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. Investigation or original research on some special 
topic relating to mechanical engineering. Staff 

180, 181. Mechanical Problems. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. For sophomores and juniors. 
203. Advanced Machine Design. I. 4 Hrs. Continuation of M. E. 113. Two 
lectures and recitations and two three-hour computation periods. 

Mr. Pierce 

205. Industrial Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Pierce 

220. Heat and Power Engineering. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Phys. 105 and 107 and 

Math. 108 (or reg. in Math. 108). Mr. Cather and Mr. Reynolds 

-221. Thermodynamics of Engineering. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Physics 105 and 107, 

and Math. 108 (or reg. in Math. 108). Mr. Cather and Mr. Reynolds 

*222. Heat Engines. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of M. E. 221. 

Mr. Cather and Mr. Reynolds 
*223. Steam Power Plants. I. 3 Hrs. PR: M. E. 221. Mr. Cather 

224. Steam Turbines. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. E. 222. Mr. Cather 

225. Gas Engines and Gas Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. Fuel gases, gas produc- 
. tion and transmission, gas engines, etc. PR: M. E. 222. Mr. Cather 

227. Steam Power Plant Design. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of M. E. 223. 

Mr. Cather 

228. Engineering Laboratory. II. 2 His. PR: M. E. 123. Mr. Cather 

229. Interna! Combustion Engines. II. 2 Hrs. PR: M. E. 222. Mr. Cather 
250. Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. E. 220 

or 222. Methods and systems of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning 
of various types of buildings, types of controls, and their applications. 

Mr. Cather 

260. Motion and. Time Study. II. 3 Hrs. Process and operation analysis essen- 
tial to increasing efficiency of manufacturing and decreasing worker 
fatigue. Mr. Pierce 

270. Industrial Lubrication. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. 102 and M. 104. Character- 
istics of crudes, refining methods, testing specifications, selecting, appli- 
cations, and purification of oils and greases for industrial use. 

280, 281. Mechanica 1 Problems. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. For juniors, seniors, and 
graduates. Staff 



The School op Mines 227 



GRADUATE DIVISION 

397, 398. Research. I, II. Credit to be arranged. Investigation or original 
research on some special topic relating to mechanical engineering. 

Mr. Cather and Staff 

Mechanics 

Professor Boomsliter, Associate Professor C. II. Cather; Assistant Professor 

Worrell 

UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 
M01. Statics. I, II. 3 Hrs. PR: Math. 108 (or registration in Math. 108), and 

Physics 105 and 107. Staff 

*102. Mechanics of Materials. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: M. 101. Staff 

*103. Materials Testing Laboratory. I, II. 1 Hr. PR: M. 102 or registration in 

M. 102. Staff 

*104. Kinetics. I, II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of M. 101. PR: M. 101. Staff 

200. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. I or II. 2 to 4 Hrs. PR: M. 102. Staff 

201. Advanced Kinetics. I or II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. 101 and 104. Staff 

202. Advanced Materials Laboratory. I or II. 2 to 4 Hrs. PR: M. 102. Staff 

COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF MINES 

Associate Professor Holland; Instructors Sandy and Howard 
UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION 

100. Mine Surveying. I. 2 Hrs. PR: C. E. 1. Mr. Sandy and Mr. Laird 

101. Mine Surveying. II. 2 Hrs. PR: E. M. 100. Mr. Sandy and Mr. Laird 
102s. Mine Surveying. SI. 5 Hrs. This course is a continuation of and gives 

field practice supplementing E. M. 101. It must be taken during the 

summer term immediately following the semester in which E. M. 101 

is taken. Mr. Sandy and Mr. Laird 

"106. Elementary Mineralogy. I, II. 1 or 2 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 4. Mr. Martens 

107. Mining Methods. I. 4 Hrs. Inspection trips, with written reports, are 
required. PR: Physics 106 and Geology 1. Mr. Sandy 

111. Mining. I. 2 Hrs. Explosives, timbering, drilling, and shaft sinking. 
PR: Chemistry 6 and Physics 106. Mr. Sandy 

114. Mine Management. II. 2 Hrs. PR: E. M. 212. Mr. Holland 

115. Mine Design. I. 2 Hrs. PR: E. M. 212 and registration in C. E. 122. 

Mr. Holland 

116. Mine Design. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of E. M. 115, which is prerequisite. 

Mr. Holland 

117. Industrial Safety Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Senior standing. Mr. Sandy 

118. Coal Preparation. II. 3 Hrs. PR: M. E. 212 and 202. Mr. Sandy 

119. Mine Equipment and Machinery. II. PR: E. E. 102 and E. M 212. 

Mr. Holland 

120. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. An individual problem on some phase of mining. 
None but exceptional students having high scholastic standing will be 
permitted to elect this course. Mr. Holland 

*201. Oil-Field Development. I. 2 Hrs. PR: Geology 3. Mr. Laird 



228 Curricular Requirements and Courses op Instruction 

202. Coal Laboratory. I, II. 1 Hr. Coal Analysis. PR: Chemistry 6 or Chem. 15. 

Mr. Sandy 
*203. Geological Surveying. II. 2 Hrs. PR: E. M. 101 and Geology 161. Mr. Laird 
2C4. Oil and Gas Production. II. 4 Hrs. PR: E. M. 201 and M. 101. Mr. Laird 
205. Gas Measurement Engineering. II. 2 Hrs. PR: E. M. 201 and C. E. 115. 

Staff 

212. Coal Mining. II. 4 Hrs. Haulage, hoisting, and drainage. PR: E. M. 111. 

Mr. Sandy 

213. Mine Ventilation. I. 3 Hrs. PR: E. M. 212 and 107. Mr. Holland 

GRADUATE DIVISION 

301, 302. Advanced Mine Design. I, II. Credit to be arranged. Advanced detail 
design and layout of coal mine plant, particularly incorporating new 
ideas of machines and mining methods. . Staff 

351s. Coal Mining. SI. 3 Hrs. PR: Chemistry 10 hours, physics 8 hours, and 
accompanied or preceded by general geology. This course is designed 
especially for students who are planning to teach mining subjects in 
high school, and is not open to students taking E. M. 102s, 111, and 212. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Holland 

397, 398. Research. I, II. Credit to be arranged. An individual problem in some 
phase of mining. A carefully prepared report is required. Mr. Holland 

o 



The Graduate School 



ORGANIZATION 

By order of the Board of Governors of West Virginia University a Uni- 
versity Graduate School is established, whose roots are implanted in all Uni- 
versity undergraduate work, irrespective of departments or schools. The 
Graduate School is empowered (1) to direct research and investigation with 
particular reference to problems of the state and (2) to train and recommend 
to the Board of Governors candidates for the degrees of Master of Science, 
Master of Science in Home Economics Education. Master of Science in the 
various Engineering branches, Master of Arts, Master of Music, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

All regulations governing the Graduate School such as the determination 
of curricula, projects, majors, minors, standards, thesis requirements, and 
like and similar matters shall be formulated by the Graduate Council anu 
presented to the Graduate Faculty for its consideration and action. 

THE STUDENT BODY 

Seniors in the colleges of West Virginia University who are within 1C 
semester hours of graduation may, with the approval of the Graduate Council, 
enroll for courses in the Graduate School, for which they may receive graduate 
credit after obtaining their bachelors' degrees. Such graduate courses must 
not have been offered for undergraduate credit, and in every case permission 
must have been requested before or at the time of enrolling for the course 
or courses. 



The Graduate School 229 



THE ADVISER 

The adviser will arrange a specific course of study to be approved by 
the Council and, in the case of candidates for advanced degrees, will preside 
at the candidate's qualifying and final examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

(For a List of Graduate Degrees Offered see page 59.) 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

1. Candidacy. 

Admission to candidacy for any graduate degree is conditioned upon the 
fulfillment of the requirements for admission to the Graduate School, and 
also the particular requirements of undergraduate preparation for the field 
of study in which the student wishes to specialize. Detailed information con- 
cerning candidacy for the Master's degree and the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy may be found on the pages immediately following. 

2. Scholarship: 

No credits are acceptable toward an advanced degree which are reported 
with a grade lower than C. 

Reasonable standards of oral and written English must be maintained. 

3. Curriculum: 

Credit toward a graduate degree may be obtained only for courses listed 
in this Catalogue and numbered 200-399. 

No more than fifteen hours of graduate courses in any cne semester nor 
more than six hours of graduate courses in any one term of the summer session 
may be carried by a student. Any exceptions to this rule must be approved in 
advance by the Graduate Council. 
■i. Residence and Extension : 

Residence credit for special field assignments and for work taken off the 
University Campus shall be allowed only with the prior approval of the Grad- 
uate Council. 

No more than 15 hours of extension work may be counted by any one 
student toward the Master's degree. 

The maximum credit that students pursuing graduate work by extension 
may receive in any one field shall be 8 semester hours. 

No more than 6 hours of graduate credit obtained in other approved 
institutions may be considered in meeting the requirements for the Master's 
degree in West Virginia University Graduate credit so accepted toward the 
Master's degree must meet the usual departmental requirements for a con- 
tinuous and unified program of graduate study and will reduce correspond- 
ingly the number of hours of graduate work by extension offered in West 
Virginia University extension centers that may be offered in meeting the 
requirements for the Master's degree. 

The time during which credit may be acquired in extension offered by 
institutions outside the state shall be limited in any area as determined by 
the University Committee on Extension and properly publicized by the Director 
of Extension. 



230 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Each graduate student in residence, whether taking course work or en- 
gaged in conducting research or in writing a thesis or report, must register at 
the beginning of each semester or term during which graduate work is being 
done. He must be registered during the session in which he is to appear for 
final examination. Under exceptional conditions and with the prior approval 
of the Graduate Council a graduate student may be permitted to meet a por- 
tion of the requirements for the degree in absentia, provided the customary 
residence and other requirements are met. 

The Graduate Council will allow credit for educational experience in the 
Armed Forces in partial satisfaction of advanced degree requirements for 
courses of the 200-399 series established by the Committee on Entrance by 
evaluation and/or by examination. Such credit, however, will not serve to 
reduce graduate degree residence requirements. 

5. Theses and Problem Reports: 

All theses and problem reports shall be presented in the form prescribed 
by the Graduate Council at least one month previous to the Commencement 
Day on which the degree is expected. If the tbesis or problem report is ac- 
cepted, typewritten and bound copies shall be submitted to the Secretary of 
the Graduate Council at least one week before the degree is to be conferred; 
a minimum of five copies of the master's or doctor's inesis or problem 
report is required. 

6. Final Examinations: 

The candidate shall not be eligible for the final examination until his 
thesis or problem report has been approved by the examining committee. 
Following the approval of the candidate's thesis or problem report and the 
satisfactory completion of the courses in residence and the satisfaction of 
other graduate requirements, he shall be given a final examination by his 
advisory committee. 

7. Com men cement: 

At the time of registration for the semester or session in which the candi- 
date expects to receive a graduate degree, he shall submit a formal request 
to the Chairman of the Graduate Council for the conferring of such degree. 
The candidate must have completed all requirements for the degree which he 
wishes to receive, at least one week before Commencement Day. 

THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Requirements for Candidacy 
Satisfactory fulfillment of General Regulation No. 1 for graduate degrees 
(stated on page 229) will admit an applicant to candidacy. 

Requirements for Completion 

The completion within a period of 7* years immediately preceding the 
conferring of the degree except with the permission of the Graduate Council, 
of no less than 30 credit hours of graduate work approved by the adviser. 

RESIDENCE: A minimum is required of two semesters, or one semester 
and three summer terms, or five summer terms of residence in full-time grad- 
uate study at West Virginia University. For students offering 15 credit hours 



*This ruling is temporarily disc;>niinued. 



The Graduate School 23i 



in extension, a minimum period of residence at West Virginia University of 
one semester or three summer terms shall be required for the Master's degree. 

THESIS OR PROBLEM REPORT: A thesis or problem report granting 
no more than 6 hours of credit may be required by the faculty of the college, 
school, or department in which the candidate's major interest lies. 

FINAL EXAMINATION: An examination, oral or written or both at the 
option of the candidate's examining committee, shall be required, covering the 
candidate's thesis or problem report, studies in his major and minor fields, 
and his ability to apply facts and principles. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: The candidate must meet the special re- 
quirements of the department in which. he pursues his major study. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Requirements for Candidacy 

Admission to the Graduate School and enrollment in graduate courses 
does not of itself imply acceptance of the applicant for a doctor's degree. 
After a period of residence the applicant will be admitted to a comprehensive 
preliminary or qualifying examination (either oral or written or both) in 
which he must demonstrate (a) a grasp of the important phases and problems 
of the field of study in which he proposes to major and an appreciation of their 
relation to other fields of human knowledge and accomplishments, (b) the 
ability to employ rationally the instruments of research that have been devel- 
oped in his major field, and (c) the ability to read French and German to the 
satisfaction of his examining committee. 1 

When an applicant has successfully passed his qualifying examination 
he will be formally promoted to candidacy for the doctor's degree. Admission 
to candidacy must precede the final examination for the doctor's degree by ai 
least one academic year. Graduate courses pursued in fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for the Master's degree, if of suitable character and quality, may 
be credited toward the doctorate. 

Requirements for Completion 

(a) CURRICULUM: The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not awarded 
for the mere accumulation of course credits nor for the completion of a definite 
residence requirement. The exact amount and nature of course work to be 
undertaken by a candidate will be determined in the light of his previous 
preparation and the demands of his chosen field of application. The aggregate 
of correlated courses of graduate instruction should, however, be no less than 
60 semester hours, exclusive of research or thesis, except research or thesis 
credits earned for the Master's degree. These credits shall be ordered and dis- 
tributed so as to promote broad and systematic knowledge and the ability to 
carry on independent research. 

_(b) RESIDENCE: In general the requirements for the Doctor of Phil- 
osophy degree contemplate at least three years of full-time graduate work 
beyond the bachelor's degree. A minimum of 36 weeks in residence in full- 
time graduate study at West Virginia University is required. 



1 With the approval of the GraclMate Council, one other language may be sub- 
stituted for French or German. 



Curriculak Requirements and Courses of [nstri i 

(c) THESIS: The candidate must submit a thesis pursued under the 
direction of the faculty of this University on some problem in the field of his 
major interest. The thesis must present the results of the candidate's in- 
dividual investigations and must embody a definite contribution to knowledge. 

id i SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: The candidate must satisfy such special 
requirements subject to the approval of the Graduate Council, as may be 
required by the faculty of the college or department in which his major lies. 
All required examinations in modern languages shall be taken not later than 
one academic year before the final examination for the degree. 

(e) FIXAL EXAMINATION: If the candidate's thesis is approved and 
he has fulfilled all other requirements stated above, he will be admitted to 
final oral examination on his thesis before his examining committee. At the 
option of this committee, a comprehensive written examination may also be 
required. 

o 

The School of Journalism 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

History 

The first instruction in journalism at West Virginia University consisted 
of a two-hour course in news writing offered in 1915 in the Department of 
English of the College of Arts and Sciences. A sequence of professional 
courses was inaugurated by the same department in 1920. As the demand 
increased, a complete professional curriculum was made available. In 1927 
an additional full-time instructor was engaged, larger quarters were obtained, 
and a separate Department of Journalism was created. 

In consequence of tho substantial development over nearly two decades 
and in view of the rapid advancement of professional schools of journalism 
throughout the nation, the University Board of Governors on April 22, 1939, 
separated the journalism unit from the College of Arts and Sciences and re- 
organized it as a School of Journalism with an administrative status similar 
to that of other schools and colleges of the University. Since that time the 
School has conferred the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism on 87, 
of whom 2S are men. Since 1920 the University has graduated 252 persons, 
of whom slightly more than half are men, with journalism as a major field 
of study. A fourth full-time instructor was added in 1946. 

Aims 

The main purposes of the school are these: (1) to find and prepare 
superior young men and young women who contemplate reporting and other 
journalistic writing, or the editing and management of newspapers or special 
periodicals, as a career; (2) to provide in addition to thorough and complete 
technical training the broad informational background and sure intellectual 
discernment that distinguish educated persons: (3) to cultivate a full sense 
of the responsibility that modern newspaper men and women must assume 
in their relation to the community, state, and nation, and familiarize them 



The School of Journalism 233 

with tested procedure in pursuing objectives of high social value; (4) to 
stimulate an inquiring attitude toward journalism as an institution and pro- 
mote scholarly research in its various branches; (5) to furnish a suitable 
educational foundation for persons ]ooking forward to business or profes- 
sional work closely related to journalistic practice. 

Standards 

From the beginning the instruction in journalism at West Virginia Uni- 
versity has been in accord with the best professional-school standards. The 
emphasis has ever been on quality, not numbers. Only students with a 
scholastic rating of approximately B or higher have been encouraged to take 
the basic courses in reporting, and those not able to maintain an equally 
high standard in the first journalism courses have been requested to choose 
a major elsewhere. 

The instructional staff has been engaged with careful attention to their 
individual ability to give expert instruction in particular fields. The curric- 
ulum has been kept constantly abreast of progress in leading educational 
centers. Class sizes have never reached proportions where individual instruc- 
tion had to be sacrificed. The school now conforms to recognized national 
standards, especially those required by the American Society of Journalism 
School Administrators, and is ranked with the superior professional schools 
of the United States. 

Practice Opportunities 

Opportunities for applying the principles of sound newspaper practice 
are good. The Daily Athenaeum, a five-day campus newspaper, is produced 
by journalism students in the various workrooms of the school where labora- 
tories are conducted from 2 to 5 p. m. and from 7:30 to 10:30 p. m. every 
day except Saturday and Sunday. Reporters working on news runs cover the 
University community thoroughly, and trained deskworkers not only edit the 
local reporters' copy but also prepare for publication the dispatches of state, 
national, and world origin received by United Press teletype. Local pictures 
are taken by the campus newspaper's own staff photographer, and other news 
pictures are selected from mats purchased from a national distributor. 

All reporters serve as correspondents of weekly and daily newspapers. 
Some get additional practice by working part-time for Morgan town dailies 
or by taking vacation positions on newspapers of their home community. 
Majors are especially urged to obtain vacation work on a good weekly or 
daily newspaper during the summers that precede their junior and senior 
years. As a rule, student journalists have staff positions on, or are regular 
contributors to, other campus publications. 

ADMISSION 

Regular Students 

A candidate seeking admission to the School of Journalism with the 
view df obtaining a degree must have satisfied the requirements for matricu- 
lation in one of the University undergraduate colleges and must have earned 
at least 58 semester hours of college credit. A student deficient in physical 



234 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

education and military science will be required to obtain them as soon as 
possible. 

During his freshman and sophomore years he should have completed 
satisfactorily all or most courses specified for pre-journalism majors. A 
regularly enrolled student may elect courses numbered below 100 provided 
such action will be advantageous in connection with a major or minor se- 
quence and provided the total credit value of such courses does not exceed 
12 hours. For all such courses, however, in excess of 6 hours taken during 
any one semester the maximum number of honor points that may be ac- 
quired will be one for each hour of credit. A pre-journalism student not 
maintaining at least a C average during his first two years in all college sub- 
jects is strongly advised not to enroll in the professional school. 

Typewriting and Shorthand 

Before or soon after entering the University, a student planning to be- 
come a journalism major should learn the touch system of typewriting. 
Prom the beginning every reporter is expected to submit copy in neat type- 
written form and to have a typing speed of no fewer than 40 words a minute. 
If after 8 weeks the reporter cannot demonstrate such typing ability, he may 
be asked to withdraw from the reporting course. He will find it especially 
advantageous to have his own machine. 

Since shorthand is of great practical value and frequently aids a gradu- 
ate in obtaining a position, all students, especially those expecting to become 
secretaries or assistants to executives, are urged to learn it before coming to 
college or during their freshman or sophomore year. 

The Degree 

A candidate who has satisfied all general requirements of the University 
and who as a regularly enrolled student of the School of Journalism has 
earned 64 semester hours of credit of a value specified in the foregoing and 
in the subjects listed in one of the professional curricula hereinafter out- 
lined will be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journal- 
ism, provided the combined number of his credits acquired as a pre-journal- 
isma student and as a regularly enrolled journalism major totals no fewer 
than 128. As a minimum professional requirement, 25 of the 64 semester 
credits earned after the student has enrolled in the school must be obtained 
in journalism subjects. Moreover, no fewer than 60 of the 64 hours men- 
tioned above shall be obtained in courses numbered between 100 and 300. 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must have completed 12 semester 
hours in one language or 6 semester hours in each of two foreign languages 
in college; or he must have offered 2 units in a modern foreign language 
for entrance and must have completed 6 hours in the same language in 
college. He must also have acquired 8 hours of credit in one of the following 
laboratory sciences: botany, chemistry, geology, physics, psychology, zoology, 
and biology. 



The School op Journalism 235 

The Minor Field 

Since the prospective newspaper worker needs the broadest and most 
thorough education possible, he will find his opportunities and usefulness 
enlarged if while in the professional school he devotes himself to a second 
field of concentration. To meet the requirements for a minor, he must earn 
at least twelve semester hours of credit in some other subject than journalism, 
nine of which must be in junior and senior courses. 

Minors especially recommended for journalism students are business 
administration, economics, education, English, history, political science, and 
sociology. Since there is a growing demand for journalistic writers who can 
interpret developments in agriculture, astronomy, chemistry, home economics, 
physics, and other related subjects, students with sufficient technical back- 
ground will be encouraged to select a minor in one of these scientific fields. 

CURRICULA 

The School of Journalism offers three curricula designed to fit students 
for specialized branches of journalistic practice or for occupations or pro- 
fessions for which journalistic training is desirable or necessary preparation. 
Each sequence leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism. 

The News-Ediroriaf Curriculum 

The news-editorial sequence is designed primarily for the student who 
wishes to prepare himself for work as a reporter, copyreader, special writer, 
or departmental editor and who hopes to advance later to a still more respon- 
sible position in the general news and editorial field. 

THE THIRD YEAR 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Jour. 103— Copy Editing 3 Jour. 104— Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 105 — Applied Newspaper Jour. 106 — Applied Newspaper 

Management 2 Management 2 

Jour. 127 — Hist, of American Soc. 101 — Intro, to Sociology 3 

Jour. 3 Jour. 220 — Newspaper and 

Jour. 113 — Principles of Ad- Magazine Article Writing 3 

vertising 3 Eng. 142 — Shakespeare 3 

Pol. Sci. 106 — Amer. State and Advanced Political Science 3 

Local Government 3 Electives 2-4 

Electives 2-4 



16-1S 16-18 

THE FOURTH YEAR 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Jour. 230 — Editorial Writing Jour. 231 — Social Responsibility 

and Policy 3 of Journalism 3 

Jour. 221— Critical Writing 2 Jour. 128— Adv. Reporting 3 

Eng. 181 — Bible Literature 3 Jour. 210 — Law of the Press 2 

Phil. 104 — Intro, to Philosophy 3 Advanced social science or 

Electives 5-7 literature or language 3-7 

Electives 8-10 

16-18 16-18 



236 



Curriculak Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



The Advertising-Management Curriculum 

The advertising-management prot'essional sequence is arranged for the 
student who expects tc enter some branch of the business department of a 
newspaper and who looks forward sooner or later to the management or own- 
ership of a publication Opportunities in the business department are con- 
sidered even better than in the news-editorial branch. 



THE THIRD YEAR 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Jour. 103— Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 105 — Applied Newspaper 

Management 2 

Jour. 110 — Newspaper Typog- 
raphy 2 

Jour. 113 — Principles of Ad- 
vertising 3 

Pol. Sc. 106 — Amer. State and 
Local Government 3 

Bus. 5 — Principles of Ac- 
counting 3 

Electives 0-2 



Jour 



Second Semester 
106 — Applied Newspaper 



Hrs. 



Management 2 

Jour. 112 — Publicity, Propaganda, 

and the Public Mind 2 

Jour. 114 — Advertising 

Copy and Sales 4 

Geol. 109 — Economic Geography _ 3 

Bus. 6 — Principles of Ac- 
counting 3 

Electives 2*-4 



16-18 



First Semester Hrs. 
Jour. 230 — Editorial Writing and 
Policy 3 

Eng. 142 — Shakespeare, or Eng. 

181— Bible Literature 3 

Soc. 101 — Intro, to Sociology 3 

Econ. and Bus. Administration 6 

General Electives 1-3 



THE FOURTH YEAR 

Second Semester 
Jour. 108 — Community News- 



16-18 



Hrs. 



piper 



Jour. 231 — Social Responsibility 

of Journalism 3 

Jour. 128 — Adv. Reporting 3 

Jour. 210 — Law of the Press 2 

Pol. Sci. 107 — Amer. City 

Gov't. 3 

Econ. and Bus. Administration 3-5 



16-18 



16-18 

The General Curriculum 

The general curriculum is planned for the following classes of majors: 
(a) those wishing to make journalism a special field of concentration while 
getting a broad, general education of modern content; (b) those expecting to 
follow radio journalism as a career; (c) those preparing to take a position in 
high school as teacher of journalism, English, and social sciences and as 
director of student publications; (d) those looking forward to work on special- 
ized business and trade periodicals, on household magazines and newspaper 
women's pages, or on agricultural and scientific publications; (e) those de- 
siring to be public-relations writers or directors or to enter the Federal or 
state civil service; and (f) those fitting themselves for secretaries or assist- 
ants to executives. 



Tin-: School of Journalism 



2::? 



THE THIRD YEAR 



First Semester Hrs. 

Jour. 103— Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 127 — Hist, of Amer. 

Journalism 3 

Soc. 101 — Intro, to Sociology 3 

Pol. Sc. 106— Amer. State and 

Local Government 3 

Electives in second field 

of concentration* 4-6 

16-18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Jour. 112 — Publicity, Propaganda, 

and the Public Mind 2 

Jour. 220 — Newspaper and 

Magazine Article Writing 3 

Geol. 109 — Economic Geography. _ 3 
Electives in second field 

of concentration* 8-10 



THE FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Second Semester 



16-18 



Hrs. 



Jour. 230— Editorial Writing 

and Policy 3 

Jour. 221 — Critical Writing or 

Advanced Eng. Composition 2 

Jour. 113 — Principles of Ad- 
vertising 3 

Phil. 104— Intro, to Philosophy __ 3 

Eng. 142 — Shakespeare 3 

Electives in second field 
of concentration* 2-4 



Jour. 108 — Community News- 
paper 2 

Jour. 128 — Adv. Reporting 3 

Jour. 231 — Social Responsibility 
of Journalism 3 

Electives in second field 

of concentration* 8-10 



16-18 



16-18 



GRADUATE STUDY 

Although at the present time the School of Journalism is devoting its 
instructional facilities chiefly to professional curricula that lead to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Journalism, it frequently provides a graduate minor 
for students taking the master's degree in a field of specialization related to 
journalism. 

THE PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 

During the last two and one-half decades alumni who had completed all or 
most of the professional courses in journalism have found little difficulty in 
finding desirable positions. Although the school cannot guarantee positions 
to graduates, it is glad to assist them in learning of openings and in making 
contact with employers. To this end it maintains without charge a place- 
ment register for both current and past graduates. Students and alumni 
are also invited to make free use of the University Placement Service in 
charge of H. E. Stone, secretary of loans and placement. 



*ln his second field of concentration a student pursu'ng the General Curriculum 
must acqu're, before graduation, at least 18 hours of credit in subjects bearing 
directly on his contemplated vocation. In sequence (b), he will give special 
attention to newscasting, news commentary, continuity writing, program build- 
ing, commercial copy-writing, and radio advertising. Tn sequence (c), he will 
take 20 hours of professional-educat'on courses. In sequence (f). he will include 
business mathematics, business communications, secretarial tra'ning, a year of 
shorthand, and other s'milar courses adapted to his anticipated vocational need. 



238 CuRRtCULAB Ki:qiii;i:m i:\tx AND COURSES of INSTRUCTION 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Professor Reed; Assistant Professors Bell and Sorelle; [nstructor Bond 
Abbreviations used in the announcements have the following meaning: 
I, a course given the first semester; II, a course given the second semester; 
I, II, a semester course given during each semester; Hrs., number of credit 
hours per course; PR, prerequisite. 

The following system of course numbering is employed: Courses 1-99, 
intended primarily for sophomores; courses 100-199, intended primarily for 
juniors and seniors; courses 200-299, advanced courses open to juniors, 
seniors, and graduate students. 

1A. Introduction to United States Journalism. II. 1 Hr. PR: English i 
with a. grade of C or higher Required of pre-journalism freshmen and 
open to others. Staff 

1. Newspaper Reporting. I, II. 3 Hrs. Two lectures and three laboratory 
hours. Students are required to know how to use typewriter or to 
acquire such knowledge during the first half of the semester. PR: 
English 1 and 2, with an average of 1.5 or higher for the two courses. 

Staff 

2. Newspaper Reporting. I, II. 3 Hrs. Two Lectures and three laboratory 
hours. Continuation of Journalism 1, which is prerequisite. Staff 

103. Copy Editing. I. 3 Hrs. PR: Journalism 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Bond 

104. Copy Editing. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Journalism 103 or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Bond 

105. Applied Newspaper Management. I. 2 Hrs. One lecture and two lab- 
oratory hours. PR: Journalism 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. Mr. Bell 

106. Applied Newspaper Management. II. 2 Hrs. One lecture and two lab- 
oratory hours. PR: Journalism 1, 2, and 105 or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Bell 
108. The Community Newspaper. II. 2 Hrs. PR: Journalism 1 and 2 or con- 
sent of instructor. Mr. Bell 
110. Newspaper Typography. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: Journalism 1 and 2 or consent 
of instructor. Mr. Bell 

112. Publicity, Propaganda, and the Public Mind. II. 2 Hrs. Miss Sorelle 

113. Principles of Advertising. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Bell 

114. Advertising Copy and Sales. I, II. 4 Hrs. Practical application of ad- 
vertising principles, with stress on newspaper advertising. Preparing 
newspaper layouts, writing retail copy, and servicing local newspaper 
accounts. Two lecture and conference hours and five laboratory hours 
a week. Limited enrollment. PR: Jour. 113 or adequate grounding in 
advertising principles. Mr. Bell 

120. News Photography. I, II. 2 Hrs. PR: Journalism 1 and 2 or consent of 
instructor. Miss Sorelle 

122. Elements of Radio Journalism. I. 2 Hrs. One lecture and two laboratory 
hours. PR: Journalism 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. Miss Sorelle 

123. Advanced Radio Writing. II. 2 Hrs. One lecture and two laboratory hours. 
PR: Journalism 1 and 2 and Journalism 122 or consent of instructor. 

Miss Sorelle 

127. History of American Journalism. I. 3 Hrs. Miss Sorelle 

128. Advanced Reporting. II. 3 Hrs. For seniors in journalism. Mr. Bond 
210. Law of the Press. II 2 Hrs. For seniors and graduates. Miss Sorelle 
215. High-school Journalism and Student Publications. II. 2 Hrs. Mr.Bell 

220. Newspaper and Magazine Article Writing. II. 3 Hrs. For juniors, seniors, 
and graduates. Mr - Reed 

221. Journalistic Critical Writing. I. 2 Hrs. For seniors and graduates. 

Mr. Reed 

230. Editorial Writing and Policy. I. 3 Hrs. For seniors and graduates. 

Mr. Reed 

231. Social Responsibility of Journalism. II. 3 Hrs. For seniors and graduates. 

Mr. Reed 



Thk College of Law 239 



The College of Law 



HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

The College of Law, established in 1S78, is the oldest professional school 
in the University. 

In 1897 the course of study Mas increased from one year to two years. 
Since 1912 the degree of Bachelor of Laws has been conferred only upon the 
satisfactory completion of three years of law-school work. From 1913 to 1924 
the requirement for admission was one year of college work; from 1924 to 1931 
the requirement was two years. Since 1931 the minimum pre-law require- 
ment for the degree has been three years of work of collegiate grade in an 
institution of approved standing. 

In 1914 the College of Law was admitted to membership in the Association 
of American Law Schools, which is an organization of leading schools for the 
purpose of maintaining high standards in legal education. The College of Law 
is on the list of schools approved by the American Bar Association. 

THE PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

It is the primary aim of the Law School to give the student an adequate 
preparation for the practice of law. This involves not merely imparting a 
knowledge of the legal rules and other materials which courts employ, but 
also, what is equally important, a training in the technique of legal thinking. 
The work of the student is based chiefly upon the study and discussion of 
decided cases and statutes, with collateral reading of textbooks and periodicals, 
elucidated by free discussion in the class. Special emphasis is given to those 
West Virginia cases and statutes which differ from the general law. Within 
limits, the school also seeks to inculcate an appreciation of the place of law 
in the ordering of society and to consider the problem of how law may more 
effectively adjust human relations. 

The following program of instruction is designed with these ends in view. 
The work of the first year is prescribed. All courses other than first-year 
courses are elective. Neither fewer than 13 nor more than 16 hours may be 
carried without the consent of the Committee on Scholarship. 

FIRST-YEAR COURSES 

Agency. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Mochem, Cases on Agency 
(3rd ed.). Mr. Colson 

Common Law Remedies. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Cook, Readings on Forms of 
Action at Common Law. Mr. Carlin 

Contracts. 6 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester, two hours a week in the sec- 
ond semester. Williston, Cases on Contracts (4th ed.). Mr. Donley 



The program of courses as given here is subject to change. 



240 Curricular Requirements and Courses of [nstruction 

Criminal Law. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the first semester. Harno, Cases on Criminal 
Law and Procedure (2d ed.). Mr. Lugar 

Equity I. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the second semester. Walsh, Cases on Equity. 

Mr. Lugar 
Personal Property. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Casebook to be announced. 

Mr. Goodwin 
Real Property I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Aigler, Cases on Titles (3d 
ed.). Mr. Goodwin 

Torts. 6 Hrs. 

Six hours a week in each semester. Bohlen, Cases on Torts (4th ed. 
by Harper). Mr. Dickinson 

COURSES OPEN TO SECOND-YEAR AND THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS 

Administrative Law. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Gellhorn, Cases on Admin- 
istrative Law (2d ed.). Mr. Abel 
Coal, Oil and Gas. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the second semester. Kulp, Cases on Oil and 
Gas. Mr. Donley 

Common Law Pleading (including Drafting of Pleadings). 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Sunderland, Cases on 
Common Law Pleading (2d ed.). Mr. Carlin 

Constitutional Law. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. McGovney, Cases on Con- 
stitutional Law and Supplement. Mr. Abel 
Corporations. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Dodd and Baker, Cases on 
Business Associations, Corporations. Mr. Colson 

Credit Transactions. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Sturges, Cases on Credit 
Transactions. Mr. Colson 

Damages. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. McCormick, Cases on Dam- 
ages. Mr. Dickinson 
Equity II. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the first semester. Walsh, Cases on Equity. 

Mr. Lugar 
Equity Pleading and Practice. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Prerequisite: Common Law 
Pleading. Clephane, Equity Pleading and Practice, and selected cases and 
statutes. Mr. Carlin 

Evidence. 5 Hrs. 

Five hours a week in the first semester. Morgan and Maguire, Cases 
on Evidence (2d ed.). Mr. Hardman 

Future Interests. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the second semester. Casebook to be an- 
nounced. Mr. Goodwin 
Insurance. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Patterson, Cases on Insur- 
ance (2d ed.). Mr. Lugar 
Landlord and Tenant. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Jacobs, Cases on Land- 
lord and Tenant (2d ed.). Mr. Carlin 



The Ooi lege op Law 241 



Municipal Corporations. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Tooke and Mclntire, Cases 
on Municipal Corporations (3d ed.). Mr. Colson 

Negotiable Instruments. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the second semester. Smith and Moore, Cases 
on Bills and Notes (3d ed.). Mr. Dickinson 

Practice and Procedure. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Prerequisite: Common Law 
Pleading. Selected cases, statutes, and lectures. Mr. Carlin 

Practice Court. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Prerequisite: Common 
Law Pleading and Practice and Procedure. Mr. Carlin 

Public Utilities. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Casebook to be announced. 

Mr. Hardman 
Quasi Contracts. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Casebook to be announced. 

Mr. Donley 
Sales of Personal Property. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the first semester. Void, Cases on Sales. 

Mr. Abel 
Taxation. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Casebook to be an- 
nounced. Mr. Abel 
Trusts. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Scott, Cases on Trusts 
(3d ed.). Mr. Colson 

THE PRACTICE COURT 

Supplementing the procedural courses and, in particular, the courses in 
Practice and Procedure, the College of Law conducts a Practice Court under 
the instruction and direct supervision of a member of the faculty. Its primary 
purpose is to give the students practical experience in coordinating and apply- 
ing, in an actually litigated case, the legal knowledge which they have acquired 
in their classroom courses. The cases are tried exactly as they would be tried 
in an ordinary court. The first session is presided over by Professor Carlin, 
who has charge of the course in Practice Court, and the other sessions are 
presided over by a judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals or of one of the 
circuit courts of West Virginia. 

The court exercises original jurisdiction in law and equity, and appellate 
jurisdiction in appeals from inferior tribunals. Statements of facts are fur- 
nished, such as would be related to a lawyer in active practice by his client. 
Each student must determine whether or not upon such facts the particular 
case in hand is one of common law or equity. He must then frame his plead- 
ings, serve his summons or notice, and answer his adversary's pleadings until 
issue is joined in legal manner. Thereupon the case is brought on for trial 
or hearing in strict accordance with legal procedure, witnesses are examined 
and cross-examined, and the case is conducted through all the various stages 
of trial or hearing down to and including the judgment, decree, or sentence; 
after which, should the case be appealed, it must be carried through the 
Supreme Court, involving the preparation of the record on appeal, briefs of 
counsel, and argument. 



242 CURMCULAB REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF [nSTRUCTION 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws is conferred upon those who have met the 
requirements for entrance to the College of Law as candidates for this degree 
and who have satisfactorily passed examinations in courses aggregating 
eighty-one credit hours, distributed over three years' residence, and who have 
obtained an average grade of C 1 as hereinafter provided. Except with the per- 
mission of the Scholarship Committee these eighty-one hours must be taken in 
no more than six semesters or the equivalent thereof in summer school, and the 
last twenty-seven hours of work must be taken in the College of Law of Wesi. 
Virginia University. When a student, because of admission with advanced 
standing from another law school, needs less than eighty-one hours in order to 
satisfy the requirements for this degree, the C average required for graduation 
is computed on the basis of work taken in the College of Law. No student 
may receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws without at least three semesters 
in residence at the College of Law and the successful completion of courses 
aggregating at least one-half of the total number of hours required for 
graduation. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Written examinations are held at the end of each semester in all courses. 
Reports of students' grades are made at the end of each semester. 

All courses extend either through the entire year or through one semestei . 
No credit will be given for less than an entire course except by special order of 
the Committee on Scholarship. A grade given at the end of the first semester 
in a course extending throughout the year does not carry credit, but such 
first-semester grade may be considered in determining the final grade. 

Final grades are based primarily on the written examinations. But in 
determining a grade the instructor may give such weight as he deems best to 
daily recitations or other classroom assignments. He may refuse examination 
to any student because of poor attendance. 

No student who absents himself from any regular examination without 
being excused therefrom by the faculty of the College of Law will receive 
credit unless he successfully repeats the course. If absence from a final ex- 
amination is permitted by the faculty, the student's grade in that course will 
be withheld until he has passed the next regular examination in the course. 
Application for leave to be absent from a regular examination must be made 
before the hour at which such examination closes. 

To be graduated, a student must obtain an average grade of C, computed 
on the basis of all work taken during the first three years or on the basis of the 
first 81 hours, if the student has not taken the required 81 hours during the 
first three years.- 



] The C average requirement does not apply to students who entered befort 
the fall of 1939. For rules governing such students see the Law School Bulletin 
for 1938-39. 

-This rule does not apply to students who entered before September, 1939. 
For rules governing such students see the Law School Bulletin for 1938-39. 



I'm. Coi LEG : OF J, aw 2i:> 



A student who at the end of the third or any subsequent semester has a 
grade of D or less in more than half his work, computed on the basis of the 
total number of hours which he has taken, shall be excluded permanently from 
the College of Law. 2 

A student who fails to pass more than half his work, computed on the 
basis of hours carried during any semester, shall be suspended. Upon appli- 
cation to the Scholarship Committee, a student so suspended, unless excluded 
under the preceding rule, may be readmitted, but with the understanding that 
if he again fails to pass half his work he shall be excluded permanently from 
the Law School. 

Unless previously excluded on account of poor scholarship, a student who 
has received a grade of D in any course is privileged to take the next regular 
examination in that course for the purpose of raising his grade. No special 
examinations will be given under this rule. 

Students in Other Colleges 

Students of at least senior standing in other colleges of the University 
may be permitted to take work in the College of Law subject to the regula- 
tions of the colleges where they are registered and of the College of Law, but 
conditioned in each case upon the consent of the instructor giving the course 
which such students desire to take. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR 

Under the provisions of the West Virginia Code 1931, ch. 30. art. 2, sec. 1, 
those who receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws from West Virginia Uni- 
versity may be admitted to the bar without further examination. 

All persons seeking admission to the West Virginia bar, except those who 
hold the degree of Bachelor of Laws from West Virginia University, are re- 
quired to pass the state bar examination. 

Information as to the bar examinations and as to other matters relating to 
admission to the bar may be obtained upon inquiry directed to the Secretary, 
State Board of Law Examiners, Charleston, West Virginia. 

THE WEST VIRGINIA LAW QUARTERLY 

The West Virginia Law Quarterly is published in December, February, 
April, and June by the College of Law. It is the official publication of the 
West Virginia Bar Association. 

The editors of the Student Note and Recent Case Department of the Law 
Quarterly are members of the second- and third-year classes, chosen each year 
from those students who made the highest grades in the preceding year. 
This department affords to students an opportunity to do research work of a 
practical nature. 

o 



244 Curriculak Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



The School of Medicine 



INSTRUCTION IN MEDICINE 

Regular instruction in subjects preparatory to the study of medicine was 
first given in West Virginia University in 1871, the chair of anatomy, physi- 
ology, and hygiene having been established in that year. >A curriculum 
covering the first two years of a standard four-year medical course was pro- 
vided in 1902, and the work was placed in charge . of the College of Medicine 
with a resident faculty of six men. In 1912 the College of Medicine became 
the School of Medicine. In reorganizing the work an medicine the Board of 
Regents retained the general character of the curriculum previously offered 
but provided for a larger faculty, more laboratories, and more adequate 
equipment. 

The School of Medicine is listed as a Recognized School of Basic Medical 
Sciences by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American 
Medical Association. It is also a member of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges. 

Agreement With Medical College of Virginia 

Only the first two years of medicine are given at West Virginia Uni- 
versity. There has been made an agreement with the Medical College of 
Virginia at Richmond for the transfer of as many as twenty students, resi- 
dents of West Virginia, who have completed the first two years at West Vir- 
ginia University. At the Medical College of Virginia these students pay the 
same tuition as paid by the residents of Virginia. Upon graduation, diplomas 
are issued jointly by the two schools. Other students in the class may, as in 
the past, transfer to various medical schools for the completion of their work. 

THE STANDING COMMITTEES 

EXECUTIVE: E. J. Van Liere (chairman), G. S. Dodds, F. R. Whittlesey, and 

0. B. Pride. 
ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLARSHIP: G. S. Dodds (chairman), S. B. Chandler, 

C. C. Fenton, P L. MacLaculan, and C. K. Sleeth. 
LIBRARY: S. B. Chandler (chairman), J. C. Stickney, P. L. MacLachlan, C. K. 

Sleeth, and J. M. Slack. 
RESEARCH: E. J. Van Liere (chairman), P. VV. Nortkup, D. F. Marsh, and P. L. 

MacLaculan. 
SEMINARS: G. S. Doj.'DS (chairman), J. C. Stickney, E. J. Van Liere, C. K. 

Sleeth, and J. M. Slack. 
CLINICAL AND SPECIAL FACILITIES: J. J. Lawless (chairman), C. B. Pride, 

C. C. Fenton, G. R. Maxwell, F. R. Whittlesey, and C. K. Sleeth. 
CURRICULUM: C. K. Sleeth (chairman), P. L. MacLachlan, E. J. Van Liere, 

D. F. Marsh, ami G. S. DoDi>s. 

STUDENT LOANS AND SCHOLARSHIPS: E. J. Van Liere (chairman), G. S. 
Dodds, P. L. MacLachlan, and ,T. C. Stickney. 



The School of Medicine 



215 



The John Nathan Simpson Lectureship 

In 1933 the West Virginia chapter of the Phi Beta Pi medical fraternity 
instituted the John Nathan Simpson Lectureship, honoring Dr. John N. Simp- 
son, Dean Emeritus of the School of Medicine, giving an annual lecture by 
some one distinguished in medical research or practice. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The School of Medicine gives no degrees in medicine (except as noted on 
preceding page), inasmuch as only the first two years of medicine are given. 
It. however, cooperates with the College of Arts and Sciences in granting the 
Bachelor of Science degree, upon the completion of the two years of medical 
work, to those students who comply with certain requirements of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

For a suggested curriculum for premedical students see page 124. 

Curriculum in Medical Technology 

The School of Medicine conducts a curriculum in Medical Technology 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (Medical Technology). During 
the first two years students are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences; 
during the last two years in the School of Medicine. For further details see 
page 130. 

THE SCHEDULE OF COURSES FOR 1947-48 



Hrs. per week 
Lect. | Lab. | Total | Lect. | Lab. | Total 



Hrs. per semester 



G E a> 






m 



First Year — First Semester 



Gross Anatomy 201 

Histology 211 

Biochemistry 231 . , 



2 


8 


10 


3 


9 


12 


4 


9 


13 



32 
48 
64 



| 128 
| 144 
I 144 



| 160 6 

| 192 | 6 
| 208 7 



First Year — Second Semester 



Gross Anatomy 202 

Neuro-Anatomy 203 .... 

Embryology 212 '. 

Medical Bacteriology 221 
Physiology 242 



2 


6 


8 


32 


2 


6 


8 


32 


2 





2 


32 


3 


9 


12 


48 


2 


3 


5 


32 



96 I 128 

96 | 128 

32 

144 | 192 

48 80 



Second Year — First Semester 



Physiology 243 

Gen. and Tumor Pathology 251 

Pharmacodynamics 262 

Hygiene 222 

Introductory Medicine 272 . 

Psychobiology 273 

Biostatistics 274 

Physical Diagnosis 271 



5 


6 


11 


80 


96 


5 


9 


14 


80 


144 


3 





3 


48 





2 





2 


32 








2 


2 





32 


1 





1 


16 





1 





1 


16 





1 





1 


16 






176 
224 
48 
32 
32 
16 
16 
16 



246 



CURRICTJLAR REQUIREMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Second Year — Second Semester, First Half 



Applied Anatomy 204 

Clinical Pathology 252 . . . 
Special Pathology 254 ... 
Medical Pharmacology 263 

Obstetrics 291 

History of Medicine 275 . . 
Physical Diagnosis 271 . . . 
Introductory Medicine 272 
Surgery, Principles of 281 



2 


4 


2 


4 


1 


2 


4 


6 


1 2 





1 





| 1 


2 


I 2 





1 2 






2 ! 



16 
16 
8 
32 
16 



16 
16 



32 
32 
16 
48 





16 






48 
48 
24 
80 
16 
8 
24 
16 
16 



2** 
*** 
*** 
*** 
*** 



*** 
*** 
*** 



Second Year — Second Semester, Second Half 



Special Pathology 252 | 

Clinical Pathology 254 | 

Medical Pharmacology 263 ...j 
Clinical Anesthesiology 264 . . J 

Obstetrics 291 | 

Physical Diagnosis 271 | 

Introductory Medicine 272 . . . j 
Surgery, Principles of 281 .... I 



2 I 
7 I 

3 I 
I 



4 

10 

6 



| 16 16 

I 24 
I 24 



1 

2 I 



16 



16 



32 

56 80 | 

24 | 48 | 






16 16 

I 16 I 16 I 



16 



16 

32 j 
32 

32 



THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

NOTE — Courses marked " 1M are required of first-year students; those 
marked " - " are required of second-year students. 

In addition to the required courses there are listed some elective courses 
for the benefit of other University students who may need them. They are 
given only when, in the opinion of the department concerned and of the Dean,, 
it is considered advisable. If there should arise a demand for any of these 
courses, the Medical School will try to meet the need, but the schedule 
will be contingent upon the extent to which staff members are occupied with 
the required medical courses. 

Gross Anatomy and Neuro-anatomy 

Professor Chandler; Associate Prefossor C ark ; Assistant Professor Williams, 

Assistant Hess 

201. ' Gross Anatomy. I. 6 Hrs. Lecture, 2 hours per week; laboratory, 8 hours. 
202.' Gross Anatomy. II. 4 Hrs. Continuation of Anatomy 201. Lecture, 2 hours 

per week; laboratory, 6 hours. 
203. 1 Neuro-anatomy. II. 4 Hrs. Lecture, 2 hours per week; laboratory, 6 hours. 
204.- Applied Anatomy. II. 2 Hrs. Lecture, 2 hours per week; laboratory, 4 

hours during first half of semester. 

206. Anatomy of the Sympathetic Nervous System. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to 
be arranged. Open to properly qualified students. 

207. Applied Anatomy of the Pelvis and Perineum. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to 
be arranged. Open to properly qualified students. 

301. Advanced Anatomy. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. Open to 
properly qualified students. 



♦Course continues throughout the year. 
**Course completed it mid -semester. 
♦^Course continue. 1 '.hroughout the semester. 



The School of Medicine 247 



Histology and Embryology 

Professor DODDS ; Assistant Professor Williams 
211.' Histology. I. 6 Hrs. Histological structure and elementary embryology 

of tissues and organs. Lecture, 3 hours per week; laboratory, 9 hours. 
212.' Human Embryology. II. 2 Hrs. Comprehensive survey of human develop- 
ment in relation to gross and microscopic structure. Lecture, 2 hours per 
week. 

216. The Histology and Development of the Skeletal System. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. 
Hours to be arranged. Open to properly qualified students. Laboratory 
work and study of current literature. 

217. Advanced. Embryology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Topics to be chosen to meet spe- 
cial needs of students. Hours to be arranged. Open to properly qualified 
students. 

311. Research in Microscopic or Developmental Anatomy. I or II or Yr. 2-5 Hrs. 
Hours to be arranged. Open to properly qualified students. 

Bacteriology and Public Hygiene 

Associate Professor Slack ; Assistant Wilson 

220. Pathogenic Bacteriology. I. 5 Hrs. Required of students in pharmacy 
and medical technology. Open to other qualified students. Lecture, 2 
hours per week; laboratory, 8 hours. 

221.' Medical Bacteriology. II. G Hrs. Lecture, 3 hours per week; laboratory, 
9 hours. 

222.- Public Hygiene. I. 2 Hrs. Lecture, 2 hours per week. 

226. Advanced Bacteriology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. Open to 
graduates and advanced students. 

321. Research in Bacteriology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. PR: Bacteriology 221 or equiva- 
lent. 

Biochemistry 

Professor MacLaciii ax ; Assistants Gover and MoGee 

139 or 239. General Biochemistry. II. 4 Hrs. Fundamental biochemistry of 
plants and animals with special reference to man. PR: Inorganic and 
organic chemistry. Quantitative analysis desirable. Lecture, 3 hours per 
week; laboratory, 5 hours. Graduate students required to do one hour 
additional work per week for 4 hours' credit. 

231. 1 Biochemistry. I. 7 Hrs. Lecture, 4 hours per week; laboratory, 9 hours. 

236. Advanced Biochemistry. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. With special emphasis on bio- 
chemical methods. Hours to be arranged. Open to properly qualified 
students. 

331. Research in Biochemistry. I or II or Yr. 2-5 Hrs. Open to properly qualified 
students. 

Physiology 

Professor Van Liere ; Associate Professor Northup ; Assistant Professor Stickney 

141. Elementary Physiology. II. 4 Hrs. For students in Pharmacy and Medical 
Technology. Lecture, ?> hours per week; laboratory, 3 hours. 



248 Curriculab Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

242. 1 Physiology. II. 3 Hrs. Physiology of muscle and nervous system. Lec- 
ture, 2 hours per week; laboratory, 3 hours. 

243." Physiology. I. 7 Hrs. Physiology of circulation, respiration, digestion, 
metabolism, secretion, endocrines, and special senses. Lecture, 5 hour? 
per week; laboratory, 6 hours. 

246. Seminar in Physiology. Yr. No credit. 

247. Advanced Physiology of Circulation and Respiration. Yr. 2-5 Hrs. Hours 
to be arranged. 

248. Physiology of Gastro-intestinal System. II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. 

249. Nervous Physiology and Special Senses. Yr. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. 
341. Physiology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Research in Physiology leading to the master 

of science degree. 

Pathology 

Professor FENTON; Assistant Professor Wade; Instructor EDMISTON' 

151. Clinical Laboratory Diagnostic Methods. II. 4 Hrs. Study of blood, exu- 
dates, transudates, gastic contents, urine, etc. Lecture, 2 hours per 
week; laboratory, 6 hours. Required of students in Medical Technology. 

251. 2 General and Tumor Pathology. I. 7 Hrs. Includes both gross and micro- 
scopic studies with demonstrations. Lecture, 4 hours per week; labora- 
tory, 10 hours. 

252.- Special Pathology. II. 2 Hrs. A study of special diseases with gross and 
microscopic specimens from selected autopsies. Lecture, 1 hour, labora- 
tory, 2 hours per week during first half of semester; lecture, 2 hours per 
week; laboratory, 2 hours during second half of semester. 

2,54.- Clinical Pathology. II. 3 Hrs. A laboratory course in blood, gastric con- 
tents, urine, etc., and their pathological and clinical significance. Lecture, 
2 hours per week; laboratory, 4 hours during first half of semester; lec- 
ture, 3 hours per week; laboratory, 7 hours during second half of semester. 

256. Advanced Pathology. I or II. 3 Hrs. Microscopic and gross specimens 
from selected autopsies. PR: Pathology 251. 

351. Experimental Pathology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. Open to 
properly qualified students. 

Pharmacology 

Associate Professor Marsh; Instructor Ross; Lecturers Tucker and HAYMAN 

262." Pharmacodynamics. I. 3 Hrs. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

263. 2 Medical Pharmacology. II. 4 Hrs. Lecture, 4 hours per week, laboratory, 
6 hours, first half of semester; lecture, 3 hours per week, laboratory, 3 
hours, second half of semester. 

264. 2 Clinical Anesthesiology. II. No credit. Practical demonstrations of anes- 
thesia to be arranged. 1 hour per week, second half of semester. 

266. Biochemorphology. II. 2 Hrs. Lecture, 2 hours per week. Relation be- 
tween chemical constitution and physiological action of medical agents. 
PR: Pharmacology 262, or Chemistry 238 or 277. 

2,67. Bioassay and Comparative Pharmacology. I or II. 3 Hrs. Lecture and 
demonstrations, 2 hours per week; laboratory, 3 hours. Cellular pharina- 



The School of Medicine! &49 



codynaniics and comparative mammalian pharmacology. PR: Pharma- 
cology 262; or Chemistry 238 or 277 and Histology 211; or Pharmacy 110. 

268. Advanced Pharmacology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. Rational 
investigation of new drugs. 

269. Anesthesiology. II. 3 His. Lecture, 2 hours per week; laboratory, 3 hours. 
PR: Physiology 242. 

361. Research in Pharmacology. I or II. 2-5 Hrs. Hours to be arranged. PR: 
Graduate status in physiology, chemistry, or agriculture. 

Medicine 

.iatc Professors I.- ess and Bleeth; Assistant Professors Maxwell. 
Whittlesey, salkix : Instructors Johnson, Starkly, 
Teitei.baum, and Gadzikowski 

271. J Physical Diagnosis. Yr. 3 Hrs. Lecture. 1 hour per week during first 
semester: lecture, 1 hour per week, laboratory. 2 hours during first half 
of second semester; lecture, 2 hours per week, practical work with pa- 
tients. 2 hours during second half of second semester. Hospital clerk- 
ship at Hopemont Sanitarium. 1 week. 

272. J Introductory Medicine. Yr. 3 Hrs. Medical clinic — demonstration of clin- 
ical cases, 2 hours per week during first semester: lecture, 1 hour per 
week during first half of second semester; lecture, 2 hours, demonstration 
of clinical cases. 2 hours per week during second half of second semester. 
Hospital clerkship at Hopemont Sanitarium. 1 week. 

273. - Psychobiology. I. 1 Hr. Introduction to the study of human personality, 
normal and abnormal. Lecture, 1 hour per week. 

274.- Biostatistics. I. 1 Hr. Planned to aid in the understanding of the statis- 
tical methods commonly used in medical and biological work, and in the 
evaluation of experimental data in these fields. Lecture, 1 hour per week. 

History of Medicine 
Professor Chaxdi lk 

275.- History of Medicine. II. Xo credit. A brief history of the development of 
the science and art of medicine. Lecture. I hour per week during first half 
of semester. 

Introductory Surgery 

Associate Professor Puide 

281.' Principles of Surgery. II. 2 Hrs. Lecture, 2 hours per week during first 
half of semester; lecture. 2 hours per week during second half of semes- 
ter, demonstrations of clinical cases and operative technique, 2 hours. 

Obstetrics 

Professor Van Liere 

291.- Obstetrics. I. 2 Hrs. An introductory course in obstetrics. Lecture, 2 hours 
per week. 

■ — o 



250 Ourbiculab Requirements and Courses cf Instruction 

The Division of Military Science and Tactics 

Professor Lukert: Assistant Professors HAWKINS, Blaney, Norrie, Marshall, 
Evans, White, and Kohnstamii 

ELEMENTARY — FIRST YEAR 

t. Military Science 1. 2 Hrs. 3 hours per week. 

World military situation, leadership drill and exercise of command, 
weapons and marksmanship, maps and aerial photographs, National Defense 
Act, and R. O. T. C. 

2. Military Science 2. 2 Hrs. 3 hours per week. 

Continuation of subjects taught during first semester. 

ELEMENTARY — SECOND YEAR 

3. Military Science 3. 2 Hrs. 3 hours per week. 

World military situation, leadership, drill and exercise of command, 
physical development methods, maps and aerial photographs, military ad- 
ministration, evolutions of warfare, and military law. 

4. Military Science 4. 2 Hrs. 3 hours per week. 

Continuation of subjects taught during first semester. 

ADVANCED — FIRST YEAR 

1. Military Science 105. Infantry, Engineers. Signal and Air. 3 Hrs. 5 hours 
per week. 

Military leadership, psychology, personnel management, exercise of 
command, military problems of the United States, occupied territories, 
military law and boards. 

2. Military Science 106. Infantry, Engineers, Signal and Air. 3 Hrs. 5 hours 
per week. 

Tactics and technique of the elected arm or branch of service. 

3. Military Science 106 (Summer Camp). Infantry, Engineers, Signal and Air. 
No additional credit. 

Mandatory to qualify for ADVANCED — SECOND YEAR. Conducted 
at government expense from about second week in June to last week in 
August. 320 hours. Tactics and technique, practical. 

ADVANCED — SECOND YEAR 

4. Military Science 107. Infantry, Engineers. Signal and Air. 3 Hrs. 5 hours 
per week. 

Command and staff, military teaching methods, psychological warfare, 
geographical foundation of national power, leadership and exercise of com- 
mand, combined and joint operations, military mobilization and demobiliza- 
tion. 

5. Military Science 108. Infantry, Engineers, Signal. 3 Hrs. 5 hours per week. 

Tactics and technique of elected arm or branch of service. 
Air Corps: perconnel management and military administration. 



Tin: SCHOOl OF MUSIC 251 



The School of Music 
GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School of Music of West Virginia University is an Associate Member 
of the National Association of Schools of Music. It was established in 1897 
and is situated in two buildings. One contains two studios, three studio-class- 
rooms, and six practice rooms; the other contains the office, two studios, ten 
practice rooms, one classroom, and the locker-room. 

The equipment consists of 20 upright pianos and 13 grand pianos, an elec- 
tric organ, a two-manual practice organ, and a three-manual pipe organ, 
modernized to conform to specifications of the American Guild of Organists. 
The pipe organ is situated in Reynolds Hall, and the others in the School 
of Music. 

STUDENT CONCERTS 

Students giving satisfactory performances appear in recital. The object 
is to afford opportunity for the students to apply in public the proficiency that 
has been developed in the studio. 

All music students are required to attend the regular student recitals, to 
take part in them whenever so assigned, and to attend all concerts given 
under the auspices of the University. They are expected to identify them- 
selves with the various organizations of the school and are required to enter 
any to which they are assigned by the Director. 

Students of the School of Music are not allowed to take part in public 
programs or to join musical organizations without the consent of their re- 
spective instructors and the Director of the school. 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

SCHOLARSHIP: Messrs. Cuthbert and V.'ood and Miss HlNKEL. 

CONCERTS AXD RECITALS: Messis. Cutjibekt, Briggs, Wood and McGregor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The School of Music offers a four-year curriculum in voice, violin, piano, 
pipe-organ, theory and composition, and public-school music, leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music (B. Mus.). 

The Bachelor of Music degree is conferred upon any student who com- 
plies with the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, sat- 
isfies all entrance and departmental requirements, and completes one of the 
following curricula in music (136 hours) with an average of one honor point 
per credit-hour: ' 

A. Piano, violin, pipe-organ, or voice 

B. Theory and composition 

C. fublic-school music 



'Honor points in excess of those earned for credit of S hours in Glee Club, 
Chorus. Orchestra, unci Band will not be counted towards requirements for gradu- 
ation. 



252 



CURRICULAR RKQUIKKMKNTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Before graduation, all candidates for the degree Bachelor of Music must 
demonstrate the required proficiency in playing at sight piano accompaniments 
of moderate difficulty, and they must have performed in a minimum of four 
Student Recitals. In addition, all candidates for the degree Bachelor of 
Music in Public School Music must show proficiency in Voice and in one Band 
or Orchestral Instrument. 

THE SUGGESTED CURRICULUM IN APPLIED MUSIC 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music in 
Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ 



:si 


HMAN 


SOPHOMORE 




'S. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. 77 


vs. 


4 


Applied Major 4 


Applied Major 4 


Applied Major 


4 


2 


Applied Minor 2 


Applied Minor 2 


Applied Minor 


2 


4 


M. 2 4 


M. 3 4 


M. 4 


4 




Glee., Cho., Bnd., 


M. 79 2 


M. 80 


2 


1 


or Orch. 1 


Glee, Cho., Bnd., 


Glee, Cho., Bnd. 


, 


3 


English 2 3 


or Orch. 1 


or Orch. 


1 


1 


P. ed.-> 1 


English 3 


English 


3 




Fr., Ger., or 


P. ed. (W) 1 


P. ed. (W) 


1 


D 


Ital. 3 


— 







First Sem. Hr 
Applied Major 
Applied Minor 
M. 1 
Glee, Cho., Bnd., 

or Orch. 
English 1 
P. ed.* 
Fr., Ger., or 

Ital. 



(W) 18 (W) 18 

Mil. sc. (men)i 2 Mil. sc. (men)i 2 



(W) 17 (W) 17 

Mil. sc. (men)i 2 Mil. sc. (men)i 2 



(M) 18 



(M) 18 



(M) 20 



(M) 20 





JUNIOR 




SENIOR 


First Sem. Hrs. 


Second Sem. Urs. 


First Sem. Ilrs. 


Second Sem. Hrs. 


Applied Major 


4 


Applied Major 4 


Applied Major 


4 


Applied Major 4 


Applied Minor 


2 


Applied Minor 2 


Applied Minor 


2 


Applied Minor 2 


M. 107 


2 


M. 108 2 


M. 113 


2 


M. 114 2 


M. 109 


2 


M. 110 2 


M. 117 


2 


M. 118 2 


M. 153 


1 


M. 154 1 


M. 155 


1 


M. 156 1 


Music elec. 


2 


Music elec. 2 


M. 182 or 183 


2 


M. 199 2 


Glee, Cho., Bnd., 


Glee, Cho., Bnd., 


M. 240 


2 


M. 241 2 


or Orch. 


1 


or Orch. 1 


M. 281 


2 


— ■ 


Acad. elec. 


3 

17 


Acad. elec. 3 
17 




17 


15 



'See footnote on next page. 
-See footnote on next page. 



The School of Music 



253 



THE SUGGESTED CURRICULUM IN APPLIED MUSIC 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music in 
Voice 



FRESHMAN 




SOPHOMORE 


First Son. 


Mrs. 


Second S, in. 


77 rs. 


First Son. 


Ers. 


Second Son. II rs. 


Voice 


4 


Voice 


4 


Voice 


4 


Voice 4 


Piano 


2 


Piano 


2 


Piano 


2 


Piano 2 


M. 1 


4 


M. 2 


4 


M. 3 


4 


M. 4 4 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


M. 79 


2 


M. 80 2 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Glee or Cho. 1 


P. ed.-' 


1 


P. ed.-' 


1 


P. ed.^' (W) 


[ 


P. ed.- 1 (W) 1 


Fi\, Ger., or 




Fr.. Ger., or 




Fr., Ger., or 




Fr., Ger., or 


Ital. 


3 


Ital. 


o 


Ital. 


3 


Ital. 3 


(W) 


18 


(W) 


IS 


(W) 


17 


(W) 17 


Mil. sc. (men) 


i 9 


Mil. sc. (men) 


i 2 


Mil. sc. (men) 


i 2 


Mil. sc. (men)i 2 



(M) 20 



(M) 20 



(M) 18 



(M) 18 







JUNIOR 








SENIOR 




First S( 


°>n. 


TIrs. 


Second Son. 


77 rs. 


First Son. 


77r.s. 


Second Sem. 


T7/-.9. 


Voice 




4 


Voice 


4 


Voice 




4 


Voice 


4 


Piano 




2 


Piano 


2 


Piano 




2 


Piano 


2 


M. 107 




2 


M. 108 


2 


M. 113 




2 


M. 114 


2 


M. 109 




2 


M. 110 


2 


M. 117 




2 


M. 118 


2 


M. 180 




2 


English 


Q 


M. 182 




2 


M. 183 


2 


English 




o 


Acad. elec. 


3 


M. 240 




2 


M. 241 


2 


Acad. elec. 


o 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Glee or 


Cho. 


1 


M. 199 


2 


Glee or 


Cho. 


1 

19 




17 






15 


Glee or Cho. 


1 

17 



iMilitary science is required of all male students except those who at the time 
of matriculation are 23 years of age or have completed no less than 58 hours of 
work and all who have credit for 4 hours of military science or 1 unit of entrance 
credit in military academy. Students must register for military science upon their 
entrance into the University and continue in the course until the full requirement 
has been met or until a regular exemption card is filed in the Registrar's office. 

2Two hours of physical eduueation for men, to be taken during the first year 
of residence, and four hours of physical education for women, to be taken during 
the first and second years in residence, are required for graduation of students 
presenting fewer than 58 semester hours, unless previous credit has been allowed. 



254 



Curriculak Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



THE SUGGESTED CURRICULUM IN THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music in 
Theory and Composition* 

FRESHMAN SOPHOMORE 



First Sent. 


Mrs. 


Second Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Son. 


Hrs. 


Second Son. 


Hrs. 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


i 


M. 1 


4 


M. 2 


4 


M. 3 


4 


M. 4 


4 


M. 79 


2 


M. 80 


2 


M. 107 


2 


M. 108 


2 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Glee or Cho. 


1 


Orchestra 


1 


Orchestra 


1 


Orchestra 


1 


Orchestra 


1 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


q 


English 


o 


English 


o 


P. ed.- 


1 


P. ed.^ 


1 


Fr., Ger., or 




Fr., Ger., or 






— 




— 


Ital. 


o 
o 


Ital. 


O 


(W) 


16 


(W) 


16 


P. ed. (W)2 


L 


P. ed. (W)-' 


1 


Mil. sc. (men; 


H 2 


Mil. sc. (men) 


i 2 




— 









— 




— 


(W) 


19 


(W) 


19 



(M) IS 



(M) IS Mil.sc. (men)i 2 Mil.sc. fmen)i 



(M) 20 



(M) 20 





JUNI 


OR 








SENIOR 




First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Son. 


11 


'rs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Second Son. 


Hrs. 


Applied 


4 


Applied 




4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


M. 109 


2 


M. 110 




2 


M. Ill 


3 


M. 112 


s 


M. 113 


2 


M. 114 




2 


M. 155 


1 


M. 156 


1 


M. 11.7 


o 


M. 118 




2 


M. 180 


2 


M. 198 


2 


Glee or Cho. 


or 


Glee or Cho. 


or 




M. 182 


2 


M. 183 


2 


Band or M 




Band or M 






M. 186 


2 


M. 187 


2 


153 


I 


154 




1 


M. 240 


2 


M. 241 


2 


Orchestra 


1 


Orchestra 




1 


Inst. Class 


1 


M. 281 


2 


Acad. elec. 


3 


Fr., Ger., or 








. — 




— 


Fr., Ger., or 




Ital. 




3 




17 




18 


Ital. 


3 


Inst. Class 




1 










Inst. Class 


1 

















16 



19 



*Tn order to be approved for candidacy in this field at the beginning 1 of the 
Junior year, a student working- towards the degree of Bachelor of Music in Theory 
and Composition must have maintained ;it least an average of B in all Theory 
courses required in the Freshman and Sophomore yens, and he must have at- 
tained and demonstrated the required proficiency in Piano. 

1 Military science is required of all male students except those who at the time 
of matriculation are 2.} years of age or have completed no less than 58 hours of 
work, and all who have credit for 4 hours of military science or l unit of entrance 
credit in military academy. Students must register for military science upon their 
entrance into the University and continue in the course until the full requirement 
has been met or until a regular exemption card is filed in the Registrar's office. 

2Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the first year of 
residence, and four hours of physical education for women, to be taken during the 
first and second years in residence, are required for graduation of students pre- 
senting fewer than 58 semester hours, unless previous credit has been allowed. 



The School of Music 



255 



THE SUGGESTED CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC-SCHOOL MUSIC 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music in 
Public-School Music* 





FRESHMAN 




SOPHOMORE 




First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Si < ond Sem. Hrs. 


First Son. 


Hrs. 


Second Son. 


77r.9. 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


M. 1 


4 


M. 2 


4 


M. 3 


4 


M. 4 


4 


M. 79 


2 


M. 80 


•) 


Glee, Orch., 




Glee, Orch., 




Glee, Orch., 




Glee, Orch., 




End., or Cho. 1 


End., or Ch 


o. 1 


Bnd., or Cho. J 


Bnd., or Cho. 


1 


English 


3 


P. Sp. 


3 


English 


3 


English 


3 


Soc. studies 


9 


Soc. studies 


3 


Sc. or math. 


3 


Sc. or math. 


3 


Psychol. 1 


3 


P. ed.-' (W) 


1 


P. ed.a 


1 


P. ed.- 


1 


P. ed^ (W) 


1 


2nd Field 

Instr. Class 


o 

1 


(W) 


18 


(W) 


18 


(W) 


19 


(W) 


20 


Mil. sc.i 


2 


Mil. sc.i 


2 


Mil. sc.i 


9 


Mil. sc.i 


o 


(M) 


20 


(M) 


20 


(M) 


20 


(M) 


21 




JUN 


IOR 






SEN 


IOR 




First Sem. 


Ers. 


Second Son. Hrs. 


First Son. 


Hrs. 


Second Son. 


Hrs. 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


4 


Applied 


1 


M. 107 


2 


M. 108 


•T 


M. 117 


2 


M. 118 


2 


Instr. Class 


1 


M. 182 or 183 


•> 


M. 185 


o 


Instr. Class 


1 


Glee. Orch., 




Instr. Class 


L 


Instr. Class 


1 


Glee, Orch., 




Band, or Cho. 1 


Glee, Orch., 




Glee, Orch., 




Band, or Ch 


LO. 1 


Soc. studies 


3 


Band, or Cho 


. ] 


Band, or Cho. L 


M. 241 


2 


2nd Field 


2 


Soc. studies 


3 


M. 240 


2 


Ed. 120 


2 


Ed. 106 


3 


2nd Field 


5 


2nd Field 


3 


Ed. 169 


2 


Ed. 109 


2 


Ed. elec. 


2 


H. Ed. 


n 


Ed. 214 


2 










Ed. elec. 


2 


Ed. 224 


3 



IS 



20 



20 



19 



All students majoring in Public-school Music must meet the general aca- 
demic and professional requirements for all high-school teachers as prescribed 
in State Bulletin for Certification of Teachers, in addition to the School of 
Music degree requirements. 

Subject to the approval of the Director of the School of Music, Public- 
school Music may be chosen as a single teaching field, with training required 
in both Secondary and Elementary School Music. 

Candidates for certification in music may be recommended for certification 
in one field with an upper limit of 68 hours in music and with no fewer than 
48 hours distributed in subjects other than Education, approved by the Direc- 
tor of the School of Music. 



*See W. V. U. Bulletin on Teacher Certification lor Second-field Requirements. 

iMilitary science will not be accepted as physical education. Women may meet 
the four-hour physical education activity requirement by taking - group 1 (Swing- 
ing-), 2 (Dancing) 3 (Individual Sport), and 4 (Group Sport); men may meet it by 
taking P. E. 1, 2, and 180. 

2Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the first year of 
residence, and four hours of physical education for women, to be taken during- the 
first and second years in residence, are required for graduation of students pre- 
senting fewer than 58 semester haus. unless previous credit has been allowed. 



256 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Theory of Music and General Courses* 

Professor Cuthbert; Associate Professors Einkel, Briggs, and Wood; Assistant 
Professors Brown, English, Holland, and McGregor; Instructors Rhodes and 
; Instructors Emeritus Moore and Si 

1. Theory. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: M. 72 or its equivalent. Staff 

2. Theory. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR:Music 1. Staff 

3. Theory. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: Music 1 and 2. Staff 

4. Theory. I, II. 4 Hrs. PR: Music 1, 2, and 3. Staff 

Music 1, 2, 3, and 4 constitute a composite course in 
musical theory, including fundamentals, sight reading, ear 
training and dictation, elementary and advanced harmony, 
keyboard harmony, and an approach to elementary count- 
erpoint. 
72. Introduction to Music. I, II. or 2 Hrs. Fundamentals of reading, rhythm, 
and theory; terminology. This course or its equivalent is required for all 
entering freshman Music majors, without credit. Mr. McGregor 

77. Enjoyment of Music. I, II. 1 Hr. A non-technical course dealing with 
the elements of music-rhythm, timbre, form, harmony, melody, etc. 
Not open to music majors. Mr. Wood 

79. Survey of Music Literature and History. I. 2 Hrs. General survey of musical 

literature and history. Miss Hinkel 

80. Survey of Music Literature and History. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Music 
79. Miss Hinkel 

107. Form and Analysis. I. 2 Hrs. A detailed study of the structure of music. 

Mr. Briggs 

108. Form and Analysis. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Music 107. Mr. Briggs 

109. Introductory Counterpoint. I. 2 Hrs. Strict two-part counterpoint in the 
five species. Mr. English 

110. Counterpoint. II. 2 Hrs. Strict and free counterpoint in three and four 
parts. Mr. English 

111. Double Counterpoint and Canon. I. 3 Hrs. Bauble counterpoint at the 
octave, tenth and twelfth; strict and free imitation. Staff 

112. Fugue. II. 3 Hrs. Analysis and writing of classical fugue. PR: Music 111. 

Staff 

113. Introductory Composition. I. 2 Hrs. PR: M. 4. Original creative writing 
in the smaller forms. Mr. English 

114. Composition. II. 2 Hrs. PR: M. 113. Continuation of original writing. 

Mr. English 

115. Sight Playing. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of the factors essential to the sight play- 
ing of varied piano compositions. Staff 

116. Sight Playing. I, II. 1 Hr. Continuation of Music 115. Staff 

117. Orchestration. I. 2 Hrs. PR: M. 4. Arrangements for string orchestra. 
Projects taken from choral and piano compositions. Elements of wood 
winds and brass. Mr. Wood 

118. Orchestration. II. 2 Hrs. PR: M. 117. Arrangements for wood wind and 
brass separately and together with strings. Transcriptions of piano 
compositions. Mr. Wood 

180. Survey of Operatic Music. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Hinkel 

182. Choral Conducting. I, II. 2 Hrs. The conductor's art in the choral field, 

including practical experience in conducting choral groups. Miss Hinkel 



*No additional fees charged for theory-of-music and general courses. 



The School of Music 25' 



183. Instrumental Conducting and Score Reading. I, II. 2 Hrs. The conductor's 
art in the instrumental field, including score reading and practical 
experience in conducting instrumental groups. Mr. McGregor 

185. Public-school Music and Adolescent Voice. I, II. 3 Hrs. Essentials of 
public-school music, including the study of changing voice. Miss Hinkel 

186. Composition. I. 2 Hrs. Original writing of vocal music. PR: M. 113 and 
M. 114. Mr. English 

187. Composition. II. 2 Hrs. Original writing of instrumental music. PR: M. 
113 and M. 114. Mr. English 

198. Original major work in composition. I, II. 2 Hrs. Required for degree in 
Theory and Composition. Staff 
Men's Glee Club. I, II. 1 Hr. each semester. Mr. Cuthbert 
Women's Glee Club. I, II. 1 Hr. each semester. Miss Hinkel 
University and Community Orchestra. I, II. 1 Hr. each semester. 

Mr. Wood 
University and Community Mixed Chorus. I, II. 1 Hr. each semester. 

Mr. Cuthbert 
Band. I, II. 1 Hr. each semester. Open to male students who have satis- 
fied the basic military requirement and have been approved by the 
director of the Band. Mr. McGregor 

200s. Band, Orchestra, and Chorus Clinic. 2 Hrs. Special problems of organi- 
zation and development, including literature, rehearsal technique, drill- 
ing, tuning, and motivation of student practice. Lecture and discussion 
groups. This clinic will function with laboratory groups of high-school 
students. Staff 

240. History of Music. I. 2 Hrs. Survey of the progress of music history from 
medieval times to the end of the classical-school period. Mr. Wood 

241. History of Music. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Music 240. including the 
romantic and modern schools. Mr. Wood 

281. Survey of Symphonic Music. I, II. 2 Hrs. Miss Hinkel 

Voice 

Professor CVtiibert; Assistant Professors McGregor and Holland; 
Instructor — 

The material used is selected according to individual needs. Vocalises; 
English, Italian, French, and German song literature; arias from standard 
operas and oratorios. Before graduation each student is required to give a 
public recital of selections chosen from the standard literature for the voice. 

199. Graduation Recital. I, II. 2 Hrs. (Required for degree). 

Piano 

Associate Professor Beiggs; Assistant Professor English; Instructors Rhodes 

and — 

The material used is selected according to individual needs. Technical 
studies, etudes, and standard compositions of Bach, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, 
Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, Debussy, Dohnanyi, Scriabine, 
etc. Before graduation each student is required to give a public recital. 
199. Graduation Recital. I II. 2 Hrs. (Required for degree). 



258 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Violin 

Associate Professor Wood 

The material used is selected according to individual needs. Technical 
studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, etc. Solos and concertos by Wieniawski, Vieux- 
temps, Sarasate, Viotti, Spohr, Mozart, etc. Before graduation each student 
literature for the violin, including concertos of Bruch, Mendelssohn, Conus, 
Paganini, etc. 
199. Graduation Recital. I, II. 2 Hrs. (Required for degree.) 

Pipe Organ 

Assistant Professor English 

The material used is selected according to individual needs. Technique; 
standard works of Bach, Mendelssohn, Guilmant, Hollins, etc. Before gradu- 
ation each student is required to give a public recital of compositions chosen 
from the standard literature for the pipe organ. 
199. Graduation Recital. I, II. 2 Hrs. (Required for degree.) 

Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Associate Professor WOOD and Assistant Professor McGregor 

Individual lessons; standard methods; materials selected to meet indi- 
vidual needs. 
199. Graduation Recital. I, II. 2 Hrs. (Required for degree.) 

Ensemble 

Professor Cuthbert and Associate Professor Wood 

153, 154. Accompanying. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. The course furnishes 

opportunity to acquire the art of accompanying songs and violin and 

cello solos. 
155, 156. Chamber Music. I and II. 1 Hr. per semester. The study of sonatas, 

trios, and string quartettes of the most famous composers. Open to 

violinists, cellists, pianists, and viola players. 

Instrument Classes 1 

Associate Professor Wood and Assistant PYofessor McGregor 

191. Trombone. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of the trombone. Tone production, simple 
exercises and scales, easy pieces, positions of the slide trombone, and 
their relationship. Literature of brass instruments. 

192. Cornet. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of the cornet. Tone production, simple exercises 
and scales, easy pieces, fingering of cornet. Literature of brass instru- 
ments. 

193. Clarinet. I, II. I Hr. Study of the clarinet. Boehm system. Tone produc- 

tion, simple scales, and exerciser. 

194. Violin. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of the violin. Scales, simple^pieces, exercises, 
positions, tuning, etc. 

iStndents may use their own instruments, or instruments may lie rented for a 

fee of $2.50 per semester. 



The School of Music 259 



195. Flute. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of the flute. Boehm system. Tone production, 
simple scales, and exercises. 

196. Viola and Cello. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of the viola and cello. Scales, simple 
pieces, exercises, positions, tuning, etc. 

197. Percussion. I, II. 1 Hr. Study of percussion instruments. 

Graduate Courses 

Candidates for the Master's degree in Music are required to have com- 
pleted the prescribed four-year curriculum of undergraduate study in Music, 
or to have completed such a curriculum, or its equivalent, at some institution 
of recognized standing. 

General qualifying examinations are required of all candidates for the 
degree of Master of Music. 

Each candidate for a degree must select his major subject in that depart- 
ment of Music in which his degree is to be taken, and submit a thesis show- 
ing marked attainment in some phase of this subject. 

All Music courses leading toward the Master's degree in Music. must be 
chosen from the 300 series in Music. However, elective courses may be chosen 
from the 200 or 300 series. 

The requirements for the degree Master of Music in Public-school Music 
constitute 20 hours in Music and 10 hours elective in Education or Arts and 
Science subjects. The Music courses include 301(2), 302(2), 305(3), 306(3), 
309(3), 313(3), and 399(4). Credit for work in Band and Orchestra Instruments 
will be accepted towards the Advanced Applied Music requirements. 

The requirements for the degree Master of Music in Applied Music con- 
stitute 20 hours in Music and 10 hours elective in Arts and Science subjects. 
The Music courses include 301 (4), 302 (4), 307 (3) or 313 (3), 308 (3), 309 (3), 
and 399 (3). Credit in Advanced Applied Music must be earned in Piano, Voice, 
Violin, or Pipe Organ. 

301. Advanced Applied Music. I. 2 or 4 Hrs. Continuation of study in Applied 
Music (voice, piano, violin, pipe organ, band and orchestra instruments), 
including public performance of advanced compositions. Staff 

302. Advanced Applied Music. II. 2 or 4 Hrs. Continuation of Music 301. Staff 

305. Advanced Public-school Music. 1. 3 Hrs. Survey and critical study of the 
vocal and instrumental repertoire of Public-school Music, with discussions 
of essentials in its performance. Miss Hinkel 

306. Advanced Public-school Music. II. 3 Hrs. Continuation of Music 305. Com 
prehensive study, evaluation, and interpretation of musical masterpieces 
suitable for use in Public-school Music, including all of the principal 
types. Miss Hinkel 

307. Advanced Composition. I, II. 3 Hrs. Composition in larger forms. 

Mr. English 

308. Music Literature. I, II. 3 Hrs. Survey and critical study of music literature 
in the major field of Applied Music. Staff 

309. Advanced Conducting. I. 3 Hrs. Study and practice in the conducting of 
advanced choral and instrumental works, including advanced score-read- 
ing. Mr. Wood 

313. Advanced Orchestration. II. 3 Hrs. A study in advanced technique of 

orchestral arranging, including arranging of Bach's and Beethoven's solo 

' instrumental works. Mr. Wood 

399. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. Including research in the Major or related field 

of music. Staff 

o 



260 Curricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

The College of Pharmacy 
ORGANIZATION AND OBJECTIVES 

In response to the request of the West Virginia State Pharmaceutical 
Association, a forward-looking group of pharmacists practicing in the state 
who recognized the necessity for more thoroughly educated and hetter-trained 
pharmacists, the Board of Regents in 1914 established a Department of Phar- 
macy in the School of Medicine. The first course offered was a two-year 
course leading to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph. G.). 

In 1917 additional courses of three and four years, leading to the degrees 
of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph. C.) and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B. S. Phar.), were established. The course leading to the degree of Gradu- 
ate in Pharmacy was discontinued in 1924, and the course leading to the de- 
gree of Pharmaceutical Chemist was discontinued in 1932. Since 1932, a mini- 
mum of four years of study has been required. 

The College of Pharmacy was established as a separate division of the 
University, by order of the Board of Governors, effective July 1, 1936. 

The chief purpose of the College of Pharmacy is to provide a systematic 
instruction in pharmacy, its allied sciences, and such other subjects as are 
deemed to be essential in the education of a pharmacist, that he may meet the 
present and future demands of the profession in an able and intelligent man- 
ner. Its chief aim is to prepare its students for the intelligent practice of 
dispensing pharmacy, but it offers the facilities and instruction necessary for 
the practice of other branches of the profession. 

Graduates of the College of Pharmacy are eligible for examination to 
practice pharmacy in any state, but graduates of this College who success- 
fully pass the West Virginia State Board of Pharmacy examination are privi- 
leged to reciprocate with forty-five other states and with the District of 
Columbia, Alaska, and Porto Rico, without further examination, provided 
they possessed the experience requirement of these states before taking the 
examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S. Phar.) is conferred 
upon any student who complies with the general regulations of the Uni- 
versity concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance and college requirements, 
and completes the basic two-year course, together with one of the following 
curricula providing for specialized training during the third and fourth years: 

A. Retail Pharmacy (142 hours) 

B. Industrial Pharmacy (145 hours) 

The curriculum for the first two years is the same for all students. At 
the beginning of the third year the student is expected to select a field of 
specialization and pursue for the remaining two years the courses outlined in 
that group. 

Students who fail to complete the requirements for graduation within 
seven years from their first registration in the College shall satisfy the re- 
quirements in effect at the time they apply for graduation. 



Tut: College ok Pharm. 



261 



Substitutions. A student who desires to substitute another course in 
place of any course prescribed in his curriculum must obtain permission for 
such substitution from the Committee on Scholarship. 

BASIC COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE* 



First Year 



First Sem. Jlrs. 

Botany 1 4 

Chem. 1 4 

Military 1 2 

English 1 3 

Pharm. 1 3 

Pharm. 2 2 

Phys. Ed. 1 ... 1 



Sec. Sem. Hrs. 

Botany 2 4 

Chem. 2 4 

English 2 3 

Military 2 2 

Pharm. 3 2 

Pharm. 10 3 

Phys. Ed. 1 ... 1 



Second Year 
First Sem. Urs. Sec. Sem. 



Chem. 5 . 
Econ. 1 . . 
Military 3 
Pharm. 5 
Pharm. 4 
Pharm. 11 



Chem. 6 . 
Econ. 2 . . 
Military 4 
Pharm. 6 , 
Pharm. 7 
Pharm. 12 



Urs. 
.. 4 
.. 3 
.. 2 
. . 4 
.. 2 
.. 3 



Pharm. 9 2 



19 



19 



Retail Pharmacy! 



19 



18 





Third Year 






Fou 


rth Year 




First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Sec. Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Se 


m. 


Hrs. 


Sec. Sem. 


Hrs. 


Chem. 233 . 


.. 5 


Chem. 238 . 


... 4 


Bacter. 


220 


. . 5 


Pharm. 109 


... 2 


Physics 1 . . 


.. 3 


Pharm. 8 . . 


...2 


Pharm. 


108 


... 3 


Pharm. 113 


... 5 


Physics 3 . . 


.. 1 


Pharm. 107 


.. . 2 


Pharm. 


110 


... 3 


Pharm. 118 


... 1 


Pharm. 103 


.. 2 


Pharm. 114 


...2 


Pharm. 


201 


... 3 


Pharm. 202 


...2 


Pharm. 106 


.. 2 


Physics 2 . 


... 3 


Pharm. 


203 


... 2 






Pharm. 101 


. . 1 


Physics 4 . 


. . . 1 


Pharm. 


205 


... 2 






Pharm. 102 


.. 1 


Physiol. 141 


... 4 













15 



18 



Industrial Pharmacyf 



18 



10 



First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Sec. Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Sem. 


Hrs. 


Sec. Sem. 


TIrs. 


Chem. 163 . 


...3 


Chem. 238 . 


.. 4 


Bacter. 220 


.. 5 


Biochem. 239 


. 4 


Chem. 233 . 


... 5 


Pharm. 8 . . . 


.. 2 


Pharm. 108 


... 3 


Pharm. 109 . 


. 2 


Pharm. 103 


...2 


Pharm. 104 


.. 2 


Pharm. 110 


...3 


Pharm. 113 . 


. 5 


Pharm. 106 


...2 


Pharm. 107 


.. 2 


Pharm. 201 


... 3 


Pharm. 118 . 


. 1 


Pharm. 205 


. .. 2 


Physics 2 . . 


.. 3 


Pharm. 203 


.. . 2 


Pharm. 202 . 


. 2 


Physics 1 . 


... 3 


Physics 4 . 


.. 1 










Physics 3 . 


... 1 


Physiol. 141 


.. 4 











18 



18 



16 



COMBINED PHARMACY AND MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



14 



Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy in the College of 

Pharmacy and to the Degree of Bachelor of Science (Medical Technology) 

in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of MedJcine. 

The Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy degree in the College of Pharmacy 

and the Bachelor of Science (Medical Technology) degree in the College of 



*Upon entering-, those who plan to follow the Pharmacy — Medical course or 
the Pharmacy — Medical Technician course should elect zoology instead of botany 
during- the first year. Psychology, 3 hours, a modern foreign language, 12 hours, 
and comparative anatomy are requ'red for the Pharmacy — Medical course. 

^Additional approved elective courses to make a total of 142 hours are re- 
quired for graduation. 

tAdditional approved elective courses to make a total of 145 hours are re- 
quired for graduation. 



262 



CUBMCDLAR Kl.QllKKM BNTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Arts and Sciences and in the School of Medicine are conferred upon any stu- 
dent who complies with the general regulations of the University concerning 
degrees, satisfies all entrance and college requirements, and the first two 
years of the basic two-year course outlined on page 261, and the three-year 
curriculum outlined below. The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy to 
be awarded upon completion of the first four years of the curriculum, and 
the degree of Bachelor of Science (Medical Technology) to be awarded upon 
completion of the curriculum of the fifth year. 

Students completing the basic two-year curriculum and desiring to pur- 
sue the following curriculum must make application and secure the approval 
of the appropriate committee of the School of Medicine. 



Third Year 



First Sew. 



Hrs. 



Zoology 231 5 

Chemistry 233 5 

Pharmacy 103 2 

Pharmacy 106 2 

Physics 1 3 

Physics 3 1 



Second Sem. Hrs. 

Chemistry 238 4 

Parasitology 120 4 

Pharmacy 8 2 

Pharmacy 107 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4 1 

Physiology 141 4 



18 
Fourth Year 



20 



First Sem. Hrs. 

Pharmacy 108 3 

Pharmacy 110 3 

Pharmacy 201 3 

Pharmacy 203 2 

Pharmacy 205 2 

Eacteriology 220 5 



Second Son. Hrs. 

Biochemistry 239 4 

Pharmacy 109 2 

Pharmacy 113 5 

Pharmacy 118 1 

Pharmacy 202 2 

Pathology 101 4 



18 
Fifth Year* 



18 



First Son. Hrs. 

M.T. Urine analysis 5 

M.T. Normal hematology 4 

M.T. Microtechnique 3 

M.T. Applied serology 4 

M.T. Applied parasitology 1 



Second Sem. Hrs. 

Hospital Assignment 5 

M.T. Applied bacteriology 4 

M.T. Special hematology 3 

M.T. Metabolimetry 3 

M.T. Electrocardiography 2 



17 17 

COMBINED PHARMACY AND MEDICAL COURSES 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy in the College of 
Pharmacy and to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in the College of 

Arts and Sciences and in the School of Medicine 
The Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Arts and Sciences and 
in the School of Medicine and the Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy degree in 
the College of Pharmacy are conferred upon any student who complies with 
the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all 
entrance and college requirements, and the first year of the basic two-year 



♦Owing- to t lie nature of the work in the fifth year, there will probably be de- 
partures from the scheduled sequence of courses. 



The College of Pharmacy 



263 



course outlined on page 261, and the four-year curriculum outlined below, the 
last two years of which are taken in the School of Medicine. 





Secon 


d Year 






Third 


Year 




First Si m. 


Jlrs. 


St c. Sem. 


Hrs. 


First Sem. 


Jlrs. 


Sec. Sem. 


Hr 


Chem. 5 . . 


... 4 


Chem. 6 . . . 


. 4 


Chem. 163 . 


.. 3 


Chem. 36 . . 


. 6 


Fr. or Ger. 


.. 3 


Fr. or Ger. 


. 3 


Fr. or Ger. 


.. 3 


Fr. or Ger. 


. 3 


Military 3 


.. 2 


Military 4 . 


. 2 


Pharm. 106 


2 


Pharm. 107 


. 2 


Pharm. 4 . 


... 2 


Pharm. 6 . . 


. 4 


Physics 1 . . 


.. 3 


Psychol. 101 


. 3 


Pharm. 5 . 


.. 3 


Pharm. 7 . . 


. 2 


Physics 3 . 


.. 1 


Physics 2 . . 


. 3 


Pharm. 9 . 


.. 2 


Pharm. 12 . 


. 3 


Pharm. 108 


.. 3 


Physics 4 . . 


. 1 


Pharm. 11 


.. 3 






Zool. 231 . . 


.. 5- 







19 18 20 18 

The fourth and fifth years to be completed as per curriculum of the first 
two years in the School of Medicine. In view of the fact that the enrollment 
of the School of Medicine is limited, application for entrance must be made in 
accordance with the regulations of the School of Medicine. 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVE COURSES 



First Semester 

Subject Hrs. 

Biol. 1 — Biology 4 

Bot. 221— Plant Physiol 4, 

Bus. Ad. 121— Elements of 

Marketing 3 

Bus. Ad. 141 — Business Law 3 

Chem. Ill — Synthetic Inorganic 

Chemistry 4 

Chem. 214— Organic Qual. Anal. ... 3 
Chem. 251 — Industrial Inorganic 

Chemistry 3 

Chem. 63 or 163— Physical 

Chemistry 3 

Chem. 247 — Stereochemistry 2 

Chem. 141 — Assigned Topics ..1 to 5 

Chem. 277— Synthetic Drugs 2 

Chem. 343 — Advanced Organic 

Chemistry 4 

Econ. Ill — Money and Banking ... 3 
French 1 — (When not offered for 

entrance credit) 3 

Geol. 1 — General Geology 3 

Geol. 284 — Mineralogy 4 

German 1 — (When not offered 

for entrance credit) 3 

German 121 — Scientific German ... 3 
Journal. 113 — Prin. of Advertising . 3 

Math. 3 — College Algebra 4 

Math. 4 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

Pharm. 115 — Microscopy 2 to 3 

Pharm. 116 — Pharmaceutical 

Investigation 2 to 3 

Physics 109 — Problems in General 

Physics 2 

Speech 11 — Public Speaking 3 

Sociol. 101— Intro, to Sociol 3 

Zool. 3 — General Zoology 4 



Second Semester 

Subject Hrs. 

Zool. 231 — Comparative Anat 5 

Bus. Ad.127— Salesmanship 2 

Bus. Ad. 122— Marketing of 

Manufactured Goods. - 3 

Chem. 252— Indust. Org. Chem 3 

Chem. 162 — Colloidal Chem 4 

Chem. 274 — History of Chem 2 

Chem. 142 — Assigned Topics ... 1 to 5 

Chem. 214 — Organic Qual. Anal 3 

Chem. 277 — Synthetic Drugs 2 

Ch. Eng. 102— Blow-Pipe Anal. 

and Assaying 2 

Ch. Eng 201— Unit Organic 

Processes 3 

Ch. Eng. 202— Water Exam, and 

Purification 2 

Econ. 114 — Corporation Finance ... 3 
French 2 — (When not offered 

for entrance credit) 3 

Geol. 1 — General Geology 3 

German 2 — (When not offered 

for entrance credit) 3 

German 122 — Scientific German ... 3 

Math. 3 — College Algebra 4 

Math. 4 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

Pharm. 115 — Microscopy 2 to 3 

Pharm. 116 — Pharmaceutical 

Investigations 2 to 3 

Physics 110 — Problems in General 

Physics 2 

Physics 116 — Photography 3 

Speech 11— Public Speaking 3 

Zool. 2— Vertebrate Zool 4 

Psychol. 1 — Intro, to Psychol 3 

Psychol. 10 — Applied Psychol 3 



264 CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS AXI) COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

(For explanation of abbreviations see page 88) 
Professors Hayman and Bergy; Associate Professor Geilek ; Instructor Wojcik 

1. Theoretical Pharmacy. I. 3 Hrs. Descriptive and experimental lectures 
and recitations, embracing a study of the apparatus and technique neces- 
sary for the correct procedure in the manufacture of pharmaceutical 
preparations (86 hrs.). Lectures and recitations. Mr. Geiler 

2. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic and Stoichiometry. I. 2 Hrs. Lectures and 
recitations (36 hours). Mr. Wojcik 

3. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic. II. 2 Hrs. Continuation of Pharmacy 2. Lec- 
tures and recitations (36 hours). Mr. Wojcik 

4. Operative Pharmacy Lectures. I. 2 Hrs. A systematic consideration of 
the various official preparations for which the Pharmacopoeia and Na- 
tional Formulary give formulas and processes. Lectures and recitations 
(36 hours). Mr. Geiler 

5. Operative Pharmacy Laboratory. I. 3 Hrs. This course is carried in con- 
junction with Pharmacy 4. The representative classes of preparations of 
the Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary are manufactured. (100 
hours). Mr. Geiler 

6. The Art of Compounding. II. 4 Hrs. The more difficult pharmaceuticals 
and miscellaneous preparations are considered in connection with the 
modern methods of compounding. Lectures and recitations (72 hours). 

Mr. Bergy 

7. Art of Compounding Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. A laboratory course in con- 
junction with Pharmacy 6. Laboratory (100 hours). PR: Pharmacy 4 and 5. 

Mr. Bergy 

8. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. II. 2 Hrs. An intensive study of the 
Harrison Narcotic Law, the West Virginia Pharmacy Law, and other 
state and national laws pertaining to pharmacy. Lectures and recitations 
(36 hours). Mr. Hayman 

9. Pharmaceutical Latin. I. 2 Hrs. Pronunciation, declension, English and 
Latin translations, comparisons, abbreviations and vocabularies of medi- 
cine and pharmacy. Lectures and recitations (36 hours). Mr. Wojcik 

10. Vegetable Histology. II. 3 Hrs. The microscopical characteristics of 
starches, powdered vegetable drugs, and their adulterants. Lectures and 
recitations (18 hours), laboratory (100 hours). Mr. Geiler 

11. Pharmacognosy. I. 3 Hrs. An intensive study of vegetable and animal 
drugs, their collection, preparation, constituents, and applicability. Lec- 
tures and recitations (54 hours). Mr. Hayman 

12. Pharmacognosy. II. 3 Hrs. A continuation of Pharmacy 11. Lectures and 
recitations (54 hours). Mr. Hayman 

101. Commercial Design. I. 1 Hr. Practical water-color lettering emphasizing 
arrangement and color harmony, for show cards and store windows. 
Laboratory (50 hours). Mr. Hayman 

102. Accounting. I. 1 Hr. Laboratory (50 hours). Mr. Hayman 



The College of Pharmacy 265 

103. Hygiene. I. 2 Hrs. Lectures and recitations (36 hours). Mr. Eergy 

104. Qualitative Analysis of the Alkaloids and Synthetics. II. 2 Hrs. Laboratory 
(100 hours). Mr. Bergy 

106. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 1. 2 Hrs. Deals specifically with inorganic 
chemistry as applied to pharmacy. Lectures and recitations (36 hours). 

Mr. Bergy 

107. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. II. 2 Hrs. A continuation of Pharmacy 106. 
Special attention to the chemistry and adaptability of germicides fungi- 
cides, paraciticides, rodenticides, etc. (36 hours). Mr. Bergy 

108. Prescriptions and. Incompatibilities. I. 3 Hrs. The prescription is studied 
relative to the interpretation of the chemical, pharmaceutical, and thera- 
peutical incompatibilities, posology, art of dispensing, and Latin nomen- 
clature. Lectures and recitations (54 hours). Mr. Hayman 

109. Prescription Practice. II. 2 Hrs. A laboratory course embracing prescrip- 
tion filling and dispensing. Laboratory (100 hours). Mr. Hayman 

110. Assay and Pharmaceutical Testing. I. 3 Hrs. A critical study of 
U. S. P. & N. F. methods of assays. Lecture (18 hours), laboratory (100 
hours). Mr. Geiler 

113. U. S. P. and N. F. II. 5 Hrs. A comprehensive study of the United States 
Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary, including review on related 
subjects. Recitations (90 hours). Mr. Hayman 

114. Commercial Pharmacy. II. 2 Hrs. The establishment, management, and 
development of a modern pharmacy, with special emphasis on business 
economics, accounting, correspondence, salesmanship, and advertising. 
Lectures and recitations (36 hours). Mr. Geiler 

115. Advanced Microscopy. I or II. 2 to 3 Hrs. A laboratory course concerned 
with the microscopy of vegetable foods and technical products, quantita- 
tive microscopic methods, and micrometry. Permission of instructor must 
be obtained before electing. Laboratory (100 to 150 hours). Mr. Hayman 

116. Pharmaceutical Investigation. I or II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Original investigation 
in pharmacy or pharmaceutical chemistry. Laboratory and collateral 
reading. (100 to 150 hours). Mr. Hayman and Staff 

117. Dispensing. I or II. 1 or 2 Hrs. A practical course in University Pharmacy 
under the supervision of a registered pharmacist in compounding, pricing, 
and filing prescriptions. Laboratory (50 to 100 hours). 

Mr. Hayman and Staff 

118. New and Nonofficial Remedies. II. 1 Hr. A critical study of the most 
recent pharmaceutical introductions as approved by the Council of 
Pharmacy of the American Medical Association. Lectures and recita- 
tions (18 hours). Mr. Bergy 

120. Cosmetics. I. 1 or 2 Hrs. A laboratory course devoted to compounding 
a large number of preparations of this type, including perfumes (50 or 
100 hours). Mr. Bergy 

121. Household Products. II. 1 or 2 Hrs. Laboratory (100 hours). Mr. Bergy 
201. Pharmacology. II. 3 Hrs. A general survey of the pharmacological, anti- 
dotal, and therapeutic action of the more potent drugs which the pharma- 
cist is called upon to dispense. Lectures and recitations (54 hours). 

Mr. Bergy 



266 Curriculae Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

202. Pharmacology. II. 2 Hrs. A continuation of Pharmacy 201. Lectures and' 
recitations (36 hours). Mr. Bergy 

203. Biological and Chemical Therapy. I. 2 Hrs. A thorough study of hormones, 
vitamins, glandular products, the newer chemical medicinals, and the 
methods of preparation and standardization of biologicals. (36 hours). 

Mr. Bergy 
205. History of Pharmacy. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Bergy 



The School of Physical Education and Athletics 

ORGANIZATION 

For purposes of administration and instruction the School of Physical 
Education and Athletics is organized into the following departments: 
I. Service program for men. 
II. Service program for women. 

III. Curriculum for majors and graduate students preparing for positions 
in health and physical education, athletic coaching, and recreation. 

IV. Intramural Sports. 

The various departments of the school serve the students of all depart- 
ments of the University by providing a systematic program of physical edu- 
cation and recreation. 

The department of curriculum for majors provides professional training 
for all men and women who are desirous of becoming teachers of physical 
education and coaches in high schools and colleges, or directors of public 
recreation. Those who complete the course will also have satisfied the pre- 
requisites for entrance into departments in universities giving training in 
physical therapy. Anyone completing the course of study outlined by the 
school and authorized by the University and receiving an honor-point average 
of one honor point for each credit hour taken in the University qualifies for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (B.S.P.E.). Courses 
are also offered in health and physical education at the graduate level leading 
to the Master of Science degree. The bulletins and announcements of the 
Graduate Council should be referred to for further details of the residence 
and course requirements. 

THE STANDING COMMITTEES 
SCHOLARSHIP: Miss Hurst; Messrs. Semon and Tors. 
GRADUATE: Miss Griffin (Chairman); Messrs. Eomney and Yost. 
INTRAMURAL SPORTS: Messrs. Romney, Semon (chairman), Tork, and senior 

managers. 
PLACEMENT AND RECOMMENDATION: Miss Griffin; Messrs. Eicher and 

Tork. 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL: G. O. Romney (chairman), C. L. Colson, H. M. Fridley, 

J. O. Knapp, faculty members; G. W. Jackson and I. L. VanVooriiis, Alumni 

members; R. G. Gentry, student member; and Wm. G. Thompson, Board of 

Governors, ex officio. 



The School of Physical Education axd Athletics 267 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education may be con- 
ferred upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements and offers 
128 hours 1 ' with grade of D or above, and an average grade of C. 

Required and Elective Subjects 

Of the 128 hours which are required for the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Physical Education, at least 40 hours are required in the School of 
Physical Education and Athletics. The remaining hours must be selected 
from such courses as may be approved by the adviser. A candidate for a de- 
gree is required to make a selection of one of the teaching combinations on 
page 268 and to complete the number of semester hours required in each teach- 
ing group. 

The courses are arranged to meet the University requirements for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education as well as the state re- 
quirements for certification. The curriculum for the four-year course has 
been so arranged that consideration is given 'to the various activities which 
should constitute a well-rounded program of physical education for boys and 
girls of high-school age. These courses are arranged in eleven groups as follows: 

A. Required courses in physical education which include the theory 
and practice of physical education courses for men and women are: 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13, 14, 43, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 113, 114, 
127, 141, 142, 143, 144, and 156 for men; and Physical Education 15, 
16, 25, 26, 27, 28, 57, 58, 59, 60, 125, 126, 127, 128, 151, 157, 158, 159, 
and 160 for women. These courses are known as the Physical Educa- 
tion block. 

B. Required theory courses in physical education are: Physical Edu- 
cation 71, 74, 77, 150, 166, 167, 175, and 277. 

C. Required courses in recreation which include both theory and prac- 
tice in recreation for men and women are: Recreation 1, 2, 3, and 101. 

D. Required courses in health education, namely, Health Education 2, 101. 

E. A required course in safety education, namely, Safety Education 181. 

F. Required courses in English and speech 

G. Required courses in science which furnish a background for physical 
education. 

H. Required courses in education which consider the principles of gen- 
eral education. 
I. Required courses in social studies. 

J. Required courses in military science for men of the University. 

K. Elective courses which are taken at the pleasure of the student. 

It is understood that a sound and vigorous body is essential to all stu- 
dents who elect this curriculum. Each student must, therefore, pass a thorough 
physical examination before he will be allowed to enroll in this program. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the personal and professional qualifications 
of the student as well as upon a high standard of scholarship. 

Student teaching of high-school classes in physical education, as well as 
practice coaching of high-school athletic teams is available in the University 
Rural High School. Student assistance in college classes in physical education 
is required in connection with the service programs for both men and women. 



2 Students may decrease the number of hours required for graduation by doing- 
work of superior quality. For details see page 57. 



268 Cobbicular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 



Additional practice opportunities are frequently available in the Monongalia 
County Schools. 

Recommendation for Certification 

The prospective teacher who intends to apply for certification for school 
service in the state should take care to satisfy the requirements for other 
teaching subjects and the required courses in education and physical education. 

The Certification Requirements 

For a statement of the conditions governing the preparation of high- 
school teachers and their recommendation to the State Board for certification, 
see the special Bulletin, Requirements Applicable to Degrees and to Teacher 
Certification. 

The General Physical Education Requirements for Certification 

All students who plan to be certificated to teach must meet the University 
requirements of a minimum of four (4) hours (men) and six (6) hours (women) 
of Health and Physical Education. The specific courses offered to meet this re- 
quirement are as follows: FOR MEN (except majors in physical education): 
Physical Education 1* (1) 2* (1) Health Education 180 (2). Total, 4 hrs. FOR 
WOMEN (except majors in physical education) : One course in each of the 
following groups: Athletics 9 or 10; Dancing 2, 3, 4, 5, or 15; Individual Activ- 
ity 6, 7, 8, 17, or 57; Swimming 1 or 16; Health Education 180. Total 6 hrs. 

Suggested Teaching Combinations for First-Class 
High-School Certificates 

1. Physical education and biological science. 

2. Physical education and mathematics. 

3. Physical education and social studies. 

4. Physical education and English. 

5. Physical education and physical and general science. 

6. Physical education and physical science. 

7. Physical education and biological and general science. 

8. Other combinations approved by the adviser. 

THE GENERAL AND SPECIALIZED CURRICULA 

A General Curriculum looking toward broad, general preparation in the 
fields of health and physical education, athletic coaching, and public recre- 
ation and providing teacher certification and graduation with a degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education is offered by the School of Physical 
Education and Athletics. 

Plans have been approved also for the development of three Specialized 
Curricula looking toward additional and more detailed training in either 
health education, athletic coaching, or public recreation. Students generally 
will take, in their first two years, background work in science and the general 



♦This requirement should be m^t by the inen In their first year of residence 
and by the women in their first two years of residence. 



Thk School of Physical Education and Athletics 269 

liberal arts subjects. In the Junior year opportunity is offered to continue 
the general curriculum, which provides broad training in health and physi- 
cal education, athletic coaching, and recreation, or to elect one of the three 
specializing curricula, which will enable the student to devote more time to 
the chosen field of either health education, athletic coaching, or recreation. 

THE SERVICE PROGRAM FOR MEN 

Associate Professor TORK; Assistant Professors RODGERS, Smith, and SEMON; In- 
structors Eichek, Patton, and Howell 

The courses offered in this department are designed to meet the needs of 
tbe men of the University for an organized program of instruction and rec- 
reation during their period of residence. The purposes of the department 
are to develop recreational skills which can be enjoyed while in college and 
invested in leisure time after college, to establish habits of regular partici- 
pation, and to develop favorable attitudes tow T ard wholesome play. 

Students completing Physical Education 1 and 2 meet the University re- 
quirements of two hours' credit in physical education as a prerequisite for 
graduation of all students subject to this requirement. 

During Freshmen Week all freshmen will report to the Health Service 
for physical and medical examination. These examinations are the guide 
in the selection of a program of physical education for the individual student. 

Courses 

1. Service Program for Men. I. 1 Hr. Required of all freshmen men in the 
University (except majors in physical education). 

Students who are found to be physically unable to engage in regular 
activity will be assigned to the restricted group for a restricted program 
of physical education recommended hy the University physician and un- 
der the direction of the Staff of the department. 

Students w T ho wish to substitute Varsity athletics for Physical Education 
1 or 2 may do so by obtaining permission from both the coach of the re- 
spective sport and the director of the service program. Members of this 
athletics-for-credit group are required to take all tests and examinations 
given to the regular group. Credit in Physical Education 1 and 2 earned 
by participation in the athletics-for-credit group will not be accepted by 
the State Department of Education for certification. 

All other students will be assigned to the regular group for the regular 
program of physical education under the direction of the Staff. These 
students will be organized into groups for instruction and organized com- 
petition in the following activities: 

Calisthenics, running, obstacles, apparatus, tumbling and medicine ball, 
touch football, badminton, relays, basketball, boxing, wrestling. 

Mr. Tork and Staff 

2. Service Program for Men. II. 1 Hr. Continuation of course I. Required 
of all freshmen men in the University (except majors in physical educa- 
tion). 

Students in the regular group will be organized into groups for organized 
competition in the following activities: 

Calisthenics, running, obstacles, apparatus, tumbling and medicine ball, 
basketball, group games, handball, track and field relays, bag striking, 
softball, and baseball. Mr. Tork and Staff 



270 Gurriculak Requirements and Courses op Instruction 

THE SERVICE PROGRAM FOR WOMEN 

Professor Griffinj Assistant Professors ERLANGER and HURST; Instructors 

Thorn and White 

The courses offered in this department are designed to meet the needs 
of the women of the University for an organized program of instruction and 
recreation during their period of residence. Four semester hours of three 
periods each week are required for graduation of all women students unless 
they enter with 58 hours of advanced credit. The offerings include both indoor 
and outdoor activities. 

Each woman student subject to the foregoing requirements is required 
to pass a minimum test in swimming, play skillfully one highly organized 
sport and one individual sport, meet a definite standard of rhythm, and gain 
a knowledge of hygiene in relation to wholesome living. 

The four semesters of work should be selected from the following four 
groups : 

Group 1 — Physical Education 1 or 16 (Swimming) 

Group 2 — Physical Education 2, 3, 4, 5, or 15 (Dancing) 

Group 3 — Physical Education 6, 7, 8, 17, or 57 (Individual Sport) 

Group 4 — Physical Education 9 or 10 (Group Sport) 

Courses 

These courses need not be taken in sequence. 

1. Swimming, Diving, and Life Saving. I, II. 1 Hr. Staff 

2. Elementary Modern Dancing. I, II. 1 Hr. Staff 

3. Folk Dancing. I, II. 1 Hr. Staff 

4. Tap Dancing. II. 1 Hr. Staff 

5. Social Dancing. I. 1 Hr. (Limited to beginners.) Staff 

6. Stunts, Tumbling, and Pyramid Building. I, II. 1 Hr. Staff 

7. Archery. I, II. 1 Hr. 

8. Minor Sports. I, II. 1 Hr. Staff 

9. Athletics. I. 1 Hr. Soccer and Volleyball. Staff 

10. Athletics. II. 1 Hr. Basketball and Softball. Staff 

11, 12, 13, and 14. Restricted Activities. I, II. 1 Hr. (May be substituted for 
the required courses upon recommendation of the Health Service). Staff 

15. Advanced Modern Dancing. I, II. 1 Hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 2. Staff 

16. Advanced Swimming, Diving, and Life Saving. I, II. 1 Hr. PR: Phys. 
Ed. 1. Staff 

17. Tennis. II. 1 Hr. Staff 
57. Gymnastics. I, II. 1 Hr. Conditioning exercises. Staff 

101, 102. Service Program for Junior Women. I and II. 1 Hr. Students may 
select any course from the above groups for which they have not previ- 
ously received credit. Staff 

103, 104. Service Program for Senior Women. I and II. 1 Hr. Students may 
select any course from the above groups for which they have not previ- 
ously received credit. Staff 

THE CURRICULUM FOR MAJORS 

The curriculum for majors is organized to provide professional training 
for all men and women who are desirous of becoming teachers of health and 
physical education in the high schools and colleges or directors of recreation 
in municipal systems or technicians in physical therapy. During the past 



The School of Physical Education and Athletics 



2?j 



decade there has been an increasing interest in the physical activities of the 
boys and girls of school age as well as in inter-institutional athletics. In 1927 
the State of West Virginia adopted a state-wide program of physical education 
for all secondary schools of the state. To meet this need for adequately 
trained teachers of physical education the department of curriculum for 
majors was organized. 

The courses are arranged to meet the University requirements for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education as well as the state 
requirements for certification. The curriculum for the four-year course has 
been so arranged that consideration is given to the various activities which 
should constitute a well-rounded program of physical education for boys 
and girls of high-school age. 

The Four-year Curriculum in Physical Education 

(Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education) 
Physical education for men (47); for women (44); health education (4); 

recreation (7) ; safety education (2) ; English and speech (12) ; social studies 

(12); science — -anatomy, biology, chemistry, physiology (20); education (20); 

military science (men) (8) ; electives (men) (23): electives (women) (25). 
NOTE: Humanities 1 may be substituted for four Hrs. of social studies, 

and Humanities 2 fulfills the requirement in English Literature. 

NOTE: For late changes in the system of numbering theory and practice 
courses in physical education, see the revised bulletin, "Announcements of the 
School of Physical Education and Athletics, 1947-48 Session/' 

The Curriculum in Physical Education for Men 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hrs. sec. Sem. Hrs. First Sem. nrs. Sec. Sem. Hrs. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 Chemistry 1 . . 4 Chemistry 2 . . 4 

Biology 1 4 History 2 3 Phys. Ed. 46 . . 1 Phys. Ed. 12 . . 1 

History 1 3 Phys. Ed. 14 . . 1 Phys. Ed. 113 . 1 Phys. Ed. 114 . 1 

Phys. Ed. 11 . . 1 Phys. Ed. 45 . 1 Phys. Ed. 77 . . 2 Phys. Ed. 157 . 1 

Phys. Ed. 44 . . 1 Speech 11 ... 3 Recreation 1 . . 2 Phys. Ed. 74 . . 4 

Phys. Ed. 71 . . 1 Mil. Sci. 2 2 Mil. Sci. 3 2 Recreation 2 . 3 

Mil. Sci. 1 2 Biol, or other Electives . . 2 or 4 Health Ed. 2 . . 2 

Electives ..2 or 3 electives 4 Mil. Sci. 4 2 



17 or 18 




THIRD YEAR 


First Sent. nrs. 


See. Sem. II 


Educ. 106 3 


Zoology 151 ... 


Educ. 109 2 


Phys. Ed. 150 . 


Phys. Ed. Ill . 2 


Phys. Ed. 160 . 


Phys. Ed. 156 . 1 


Educ. or other 


Phys. Ed. 175 . 3 


electives 5 to 


Safety Ed. 181. 2 




First Aid 2 




Electives 3 





14 or 16 
FOURTH YEAR 



IS 



First St m. Hrs. 
Phys. Ed. 191 . 2 
Phys. Ed. 141. 1 
Fhys. Ed. 143 . 1 
Phys. Ed. 158 

(or elect.) . . 1 
Health Ed. 101 2 

Educ. 120 2 

Educ. 152 2 

Educ. 224 3 

Educ. 214 2 



Sec. Sem. 1 

Phys. Ed. 192 
Phys. Ed. 142 
Phys. Ed. 144 . 
Phys. Ed. 158 
(or elect.) . 
Phys. Ed. 277 

Educ. 120 2 

Educ. 152 2 

Educ. 224 3 

Educ. 214 2 



18 



14 or 16 



16 



17 



272 



CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS AM) COURSES OF 1 NS I'Kl <TI<>.\ 



The Curriculum in Physical Education for Women 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 



First St ■■. J l>s. 

English 1 3 

History 1 3 

or 

Humanities 1 . 4 

Biology 1 .... 4 
Phys. Ed. 5 

(elect.) 1 

Phys. Ed. 25 . . 1 

Phys. Ed. 27 . . 1 

Phys. Ed. 28 . . 1 

Phys. Ed. 71 . . 1 



St c. Sem. 
English 2 
History 2 3 

or 
Humanities 2 . 4 
Phys. Ed. 5 

(elect.) 1 

Phys. Ed. 15 . 1 
Phys. Ed. 16 . . 1 
Phys. Ed. 24 . . 1 
Biol, or other 

electives 4 to 7 



J Irs. 
.. 3 



15 or 16 



15 to IS 



THIRD YEAR 



First St m. Jlrs. 

Educ. 106 3 

Fduc. 109 2 

Phys. Ed. 26 . . 1 
Phys. Ed. 126 . 1 
Phys. Ed. 127 . 2 
Phys. Ed. 175 . 3 
Safety. Ed. 181 . ? 
Electives 2 



///. 



Sec. Son. 
Zoology 151 . . 
Phys. Ed. 57 . . 
Phys. Ed. 60 . 
Phys. Ed. 151 . 
Phys. Ed. 166 . 
Electives . .4 to 



First Sem. 



II r. 



Chemistry 1 . . . 
Phys. Ed. 37 . . 
Phys. Ed. 59 . . 
Phys. Ed. 77 . . 
Phys. Ed. 167 . 
Recreation 1 . . 
Elective . . 3 to 



Sec. Sem. Hrs 

Chemistry 2 . . 4 
Phys. Ed. 74 . . 4 
Phys. Ed. 58 . . 1 
Phys. Ed. 70 . . 1 
Phys. Ed. 114 . 1 
Phys. Ed. 157 . 1 
Recreation 2 ..3 
Health Ed. 2 . 2 
Phys. Ed. 38 
(elect) 2 



15 to 17 
FOURTH YEAR 



17 to 19 



First Sem. Jlrs. 
Phys. Ed. 191 . 2 
Phys. Ed. 158 

(or elect.) . 1 
Phys. Ed. 159 . 2 
Health Ed. 101 2 

Educ. 120 2 

Educ. 152 2 

Educ. 224 3 

Educ. 214 2 



Sec. Sem. Hrs. 

Phvs, Ed. 192 . 2 
Phys. Ed. 158 

(or elect.) . 1 

Phys. Ed. 160 . 2 

Phvs. Ed. 277 . 3 

Educ. 120 2 

Educ. 152 2 

Educ. 224 3 

Educ. 214 2 



16 



15 to 17 



16 



17 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR MEN AND WOMEN: Introduction to Physi- 
cal Fducation (1): Personal and Community Hygiene (2); School Health Prob- 
lems (2);; he Camping Movement (2); Management and Direction of Play- 
grounds (2); Management and Direction of Social Centers (2); Administration 
of Public Recreation (2); Safety Education (2); Anatomy (4); Kinesiology (3); 
Administration of Physical Education (2). Total 24 hrs. 

THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Professors Romney, Griffin, and Morris; Associate Professor Tork; Assistant 

Professors ERtANGER, Htjrst, Rodgers, Smith, and Semon; Instructors Eiciier, 

Kern, Pattox, Thorn, White, Yost, and Howell 

LOWER DIVISION 

11 



Football. 1. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of football. 

Messrs. Kern and Rodgers 
High-school Activities. I. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in an activity pro- 
gram suitable for junior and senior high-school boys. Mr. Semon 
Marching. Games, and Relays. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in an activity 
program suitable for junior and senior high-school boys. Mr. Semon 
14. Baseball. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of baseball. 

Mr. Rodgers 



12 



13 



Tin-; School of Physical Education and Athletics 273 

28. Modern Dancing. I. 1 Hr. Elective. Miss Erlanger 

43. Club Leadership. I. 1 Hr. Aims and program of activities of character- 
building organizations for boys. Mr. Semon 

44. Basketball. I. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of basket- 
ball. Mr. Patton 

45. Apparatus and Tumbling. II. 1 Hr. Natural activities in tumbling and the 
fundamentals of work on the apparatus. Staff 

46. Track and Field Athletics. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the funda- 
mentals of track and field athletics. Mr. Smith 

UPPER DIVISION 

111. Athletic Conditioning and Training. I. 1 Hr. Lectures, demonstrations, 
and practice work in the training and conditioning of athletes. Mr. Smith 

113. Wrestling and Boxing. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the fundamentals 
of wrestling and boxing. Mr. Rodgers 

114. Minor Sports. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of bowl- 
ing, badminton, golf, handball, tennis, and volleyball. Staff 

126. Clog and Tap Dancing. I. 1 Hr. Elective. Miss Hurst 

131. Service Program Assisting. I. 1 Hr. 

132. Service Program Assisting. II. 1 Hr. 

141. Theory of Coaching Football. I and SII. 1 Hr. 9 weeks. Theory and prac- 
tice including study of various systems and styles of play with special 
lectures on and practical experience in officiating. 

Messrs. Kern and Rodgers 

142. Theory of Coaching Track. II and SII. 1 Hr. 9 weeks. Theory and practice, 
with special lectures on and practical experience in officiating, and ad- 
ministration of track and field meets. Mr. Smith 

143. Theory of Coaching Basketball. I and SII. 1 Hr. 9 weeks. Theory and prac- 

tice, including study of various systems and styles of play with special 
lectures on and practical experience in officiating. Mr. Patton 

144. Theory of Coaching Baseball. II and SII. 1 Hr. 9 weeks. Theory and prac- 
tice, with special lectures on and practical experience in officiating. 

Mr. Rodgers 

156. Swimming, Life-saving, and Water Safety. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice 
in aquatics and safety and their use in the program of physical education. 
An opportunity will be given to qualify for the American Red Cross Water 
Safety Instructor Certificate. Mr. Tork 

157. Graded Games and Lead-up Games. I. 1 Hr. Games for all ages which may 
be used in the home, school, playground, and gymnasium, and lead-up 
games for the various sports. Miss Hurst 

158. Ballroom Dancing. II. 1 Hr. Technique of ballroom dancing and methods 
of teaching. Staff 

161. Officiating Basketball and Football. I. 2 His. Rules, techniques of officiat- 
ing, and laboratory work. 



274 Curricuiar Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

Theory and Practice of Physical Education for Women 

Physical Education 15, 114, 24, 25, 26, 28, 38, and 71 are required of fresh- 
man women; Physical Education 16, 27, 59, 60, 70, 74, and 77 are required of 
sophomore women; Physical Education 57, 58, 126, 127, 151, 157, 158, 166, 167, 
175, and 181 are required of junior women; and Physical Education 159, 160, 
191, and 192 are required of senior women. Assisting is arranged individually 
at convenient hours and is required of all major students without credit. 

NOTE: For late changes in the system of numbering theory and practice 
courses in physical education, see the revised bulletin. "Announcements of the 
School of Physical Education and Athletics, 1947-48 Session." 

LOWER DIVISION 

15. Advanced Modern Dancing. II. 1 Hr. Continuation of P. E. 28. 

Miss Erlanger 

16. Advanced Swimming. II. 1 Hr. Continuation of P. E. 27, and technique of 
instruction. Staff 

24. Basketball Technique and Softball. II. 1 Hr. Fundamentals and practice 
in softball, selected lead-up games. Technique and practice in teaching 
and officiating basketball. Miss White 

25. Soccer, Speedball, and Basketball. I. 1 Hr. Fundamentals and practice in 
playing soccer, speedball, fieldball, and basketball. Miss White 

26. Minor Sports. II. 1 Hr. Fundamentals and practice in playing paddle 
tennis, table tennis, and archery. Staff 

27. Swimming and Diving. I. 1 Hr. Elementary and advanced strokes, stand- 
ard dives. Staff 

28. Modern Dancing. I. 1 Hr. Techniques of modern dance, methods of teach- 
ing different age groups, and a knowledge of the historical background 
of dancing from primitive times to the present. Miss Erlanger 

38. Dance Composition. II. 2 Hrs. Problems in force, time, and spaee as 
elements of expressive movement. Miss Erlanger 

57. Gymnastics. I. 1 Hr. The Swedish, German, and Danish gymnastic sys- 
tems which have been practiced in the United States, studied as back- 
ground for an understanding of the modern program. Staff 

58. Stunts, Tumbling, and Heavy Apparatus. II. 1 Hr. Stunts, tumbling, and 
pyramid building suitable for elementary, junior, and senior high-school 
girls. Knowledge of and skill in heavy apparatus is included. Miss White 

59. Folk Dancing. I. 1 Hr. The history of Folk Dancing, knowledge of funda- 
mentals, and study of dances from all countries. Miss Hurst 

60. Folk Dancing. II. 1 Hr. A continuation of P. E. 59. Miss Hurst 
70. Senior Life Saving and Water Saving. As outlined by the American Red 

Cross. Theory of organizing and directing a camp water front. 

UPPER DIVISION 

114. Minor Sports. II. 1 Hr. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of bowl- 
ing, badminton, golf, handball, tennis, and volleyball. Staff 

126. Clog and Tap Dancing. I. 1 Hr. Fundamentals and practice in clog and tap 
dancing. Miss Husst 



The School of Physical Education and Athletics 2?5 



157. Graded Games and Lead-up Games. I. 1 Hr. Games for all ages which 
may be used in t're home, school, playground, and gymnasium, and 
lead-up games in the various sports. Miss Hurst 

158. Ballroom Dancing.*II. 1 Hr. Technique of ballroom dancing and methods 
of teaching. Staff 

159. Materials Summary. I. 1 Hr. Practice and techniques of physical-education 
activities. Officiating in intra-mural games. Staff 

160. Materials Summary. II. 1 Hr. Continuation of P. E. 159. Staff 
NOTE: An opportunity is provided for individual specialization in sports, 

swimming, or dancing, in addition to the activities of the block program. If 
students are especially interested in specialization in dancing, their course 
will include some allied subjects such as history of art, pageantry, dramatics. 

Theory Courses in Physical Education 

LOWER DIVISION 

For Men and Women 

Physical Education 

71. Introduction to Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. Orientation course designed 
to acquaint students with purposes, scope, and possibilities in health, 
physical education, recreation, and coaching in the school program. 

Miss Griffin and Staff 

*74. Anatomy. II. 4 His. Required of Physical Education majors. Dr. Morris 

77. History of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. The development of physical 

education from early civilization to the present time, giving attention to 

the early Greek and Roman periods, the German, Swedish, and Danish 

systems, and developments in the modern programs in the various 

countries. Miss Griffin 

Health Education 

2. Personal and Community Hygiene. II. 2 Hrs. Those phases of hygienic 
living which should be understood by all college students. Special em- 
phasis placed on the personal aspects of hygiene. This course may not be 
elected as a substitute for Phys. Ed. 180. Mr. Semon 

Recreation 

1. An Introductory Course. I. 2 Hrs. Introducing the general field of recrea- 
tion, including philosophy, aims, general objectives, specific fields, etc. 

Mr. Tork 

2. Playgrounds and Community Centers. I. 3 Hrs. Arranged to prepare physi- 
cal-education students for direction and supervision of playgrounds and 
social centers in the municipal-recreation program. Mr. Tork 

3. The Camping Movement. I. 2 Hrs. Training camp counselors. The essen- 
tials embraced are: history of organized camps, aims, camp sites and 
equipment, activities, vocational opportunities, the requirements and 
qualifications of personnel. Mr. Smith 



♦Accepted by the State Department of Education as a cognate in the field 
of biology. 



2?6 Curricular Requirements and Courses op Instruction 

UPPER DIVISION 
For Men 

150. Modified and Corrective Activities. II. 3 Hrs. The diagnosis of abnormal 
cases found in the classroom including overweight, underweight, post- 
operative, postural, and flat-foot cases, with the prescription of activities 
for their correction. Staff 

For Women 

151. Club Leadership for High-school Girls. II, SII. 2 Hrs. A study of the Girl 
Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Girl Reserves, and other movements which are 
designed as character-building organizations for adolescent girls. Special 
attention will be given to methods of leadership based on adolescent 
psychology. Miss Griffin 

166. Modified and Corrective Activities. II. 3 Hrs. Analysis of normal posture 
and individual deviations with treatment of the latter by physical activity 
and massage. The course will cover personal health problems that can be 
treated by exercise. Miss White 

167. Movement and Its Rhythmic Structure. I. 2 Hrs. Designed to give an un- 
derstanding of the nature and scope of rhythm in the physical education 
program. Opportunity is offered for practice in the analysis of dance 
steps and the building of dance patterns. Miss Erlanger 

For Men and Women 

127. First Aid. I. 2 Hrs. Standard and Advanced First Aid as outlined by the 
American Red Cross plus the Special Course which is given by a repre- 
sentative from National Red Cross Headquarters. Miss Hurst 

175. Kinesiology. I. 3 Hrs. The principles of the mechanics of bodily move- 
ments in relation to the anatomical structure. Miss White 

181. Safety Education. II. 2 Hrs. Safety needs and practices in the home, on 
the highways and streets, in schools and on playgrounds, and in industry. 
Educational procedures and programs of education at various levels are 
presented. Miss Griffin 

277. Administration of Physical Education. II and SI. 2 or 3 Hrs. The modern 
theories in physical education and guiding principles in organization and 
administration of the program. Mr. Romney 

Health Education 

101. School Health Problems. I. 2 Hrs. Problems facing teachers and school 
administrators in the school day. Staff 

180. Public-school Health. 1, II. 2 Hrs. This course in hygiene meets the general 
requirements for state teachers' certificates. (Not open to major physical- 
education students.) Dr. Morris 

191. Tests in Health and Physical Education. I, Si. 2 Hrs. Anthropometric and 
functional tests in health and physical education. Staff 

192. Physiological Analysis of Activities. II, SII. 2 Hrs. A beginning course 
in the study of physiological changes which occur in the body during 
exercise. Staff 



The School of Physical Education and Athletics 277 

The Graduate Curriculum in Physical Education 

(Leading to the Degree of Master of Science) 

I. Candidacy: 

The candidate must hold the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Education or its equivalent from an approved college. The equivalent is deter- 
mined by the Committee on Graduate Courses of the School of Physical 
Education and Athletics as follows: 

1. At least 24 semester hours, which is an undergraduate minor in physi- 
cal education as described in the University's Bulletin, Requirements Applicable 
to Degrees and to Teacher Certification. 

2. Experience in participating in athletics, in teaching health and physi- 
cal education courses, and in coaching athletics will be evaluated by special 
examination as possible equivalents to some of the above requirements. For- 
mer members of the armed forces may establish credit for educational experi- 
ence either by certification or examination. 

3. Additional undergraduate hours may be required of students who have 
had inadequate preparation. 

II. Matriculation: 

Students who wish to register in the Graduate School should: (1) Have 
an official transcript of college credits sent to the Registrar; (2) File formal 
application for Admission to the Graduate School with the chairman of the 
Graduate Council, 320 Chemistry Euilding; (3) Fill out two sets of forms for 
evaluation of credits and experience and return to the chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Courses of the School of Physical Education and Athletics. 
NOTE 1 : Graduate credit accepted from other approved institutions. 

1. No less than 30 hours, including a thesis, of graduate work approved 
by the Graduate Council, the Adviser, and the Committee on Graduate Courses 
of the School of Physical Education and Athletics, are required. At least 15 
hours, exclusive of the thesis, will be in Physical Education, and the remain- 
ing hours in related subjects or other fields. One-third of the hours required 
for the degree must be in course numbered 300 or above. 
Note 2: Substitution of course aork for thesis. 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate work of grade C or above 
may, by prior written agreement with the adviser and Graduate Council, be 
accepted toward a Master's degree from any approved institution, provided 
the total of all work for the Master's degree by extension and from another 
institution will not exceed 15 semester hours. 

III. Course Requirements: 

Especially qualified students may petition for permission to substitute 
for the Master's thesis 6 hours of work over and above the 30 hours regularly 
required for the Master's degree. 

NOTE: Courses marked by an asterisk (*) are required of all candidates 
for the Master of Science degree. 

224. Physiological Analysis of Activities. I and SII. 2 Hrs. Analysis of physi- 
ological changes which occur in the body during exercise. Miss Erlanger 

243. National Youth Service Organizations and Their Contribution to Health 
and Physical Education and Recreation. SI. 2 Hrs. This course will dis- 
cuss the organization and program of national agencies and their potential 
contributions to the school program in health education, physical educa- 
tion, and recreation. 



278 Cukricular Requirements and Courses of Instruction 

271. Administration of Camps and the Preparation of Camp Counselors. II and 

SI. 3 Hrs. The principles involved in the modern camping program and 

the methods of organization and administration of organized camps. A 

special problem in administration or program will be undertaken. Mr. Tork 

276.* Advanced Public-school Health. I, II, and SI. 2 or 3 Hrs. Preventive medi- 
cine and hygiene with particular emphasis on recent advances. Dr. Morris 

277.* Administration of Physical Education. II and SI. 2 or 3 Hrs. The modern 
theories in physical education; guiding principles in the organization 
and administration of physical education; and the objectives, content, 
and materials of activities in the gymnasium and on the playground. Staff 

279s. Safety Education — Safe Driving. SII. 1 Hr. Open to selected high-school 
teachers. Mr. Eicher 

281. Safety Education. II, SI. 2 Hrs. A study of the modern safety education 
program and its place in the public school day. Various educational 
methods which will make for the reduction of common accidents in fac- 
tories, the home, the school, the street, camps, and playgrounds will be 
considered. Term paper required. Miss Griffin 

282. Administration of Public Recreation. I and SI. 2 Hrs. The modern concept 
of the public recreation program and its contribution to the leisure time 
problem. A special problem in organization or program will be under- 
taken. Mr. Romney 

283. Organization and Development of Industrial Recreation. II and SI. 2 Hrs. 
Primarily for students who have had some work or experience in recre- 
ation and are interested in a more complete knowledge of the field or 
plan to seek positions in industrial recreation. Mr. Tork 

287. History of Physical Education. I and SI. 2 Hrs. The development of physi- 
cal education from early civilization to the present time with particular 
emphasis on its relation to general education and other world move- 
ments. Miss Griffin 

290. Adaptation and Evaluation of Activities in Physical Education. II and SI. 
2 Hrs. The formulation of criteria for continuous curriculum revision in 
accord with educational principles and in recognition of individual 
needs, abilities, and interests. A special problem will be undertaken. 

Miss Griffin 

292. Principles and Program of Physical Education in the Elementary Schools. 
SI. 2 Hrs. Relation of physical education in the elementary schools to 
present-day educational philosophy and procedures. Analysis of courses 
of study of outstanding city and state departments as a background for 
formulating tentative curricula for use in local situations. Mr. Tork 

293. Organization and Administration of Intramural Sports for Men and 
Women. I, SI. 2 Hrs. A critical analysis of intramural sports programs 
with a view to justification from the standpoint of objectives and of con- 
tribution to the general welfare of the students participating. Problems 
of organization and administration of programs for men and women on the 
secondary and college levels. A term paper of practical value will be 
required. Mr. Semon 

294. Modern Trends and Principles of Physical Education. II and SI. 2 Hrs. 
Critical analysis of current problems in field of physical and health edu- 
cation and their solution in the light of sound principles. Recent trends 
and probable growth of responsibilities will be surveyed. Mr. Semon 

300.* Thesis. I, II, SI, and SII. 2 Hrs. Mr. Webster 

369. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. II, SII. 2 Hrs. Op- 
portunity for independent study under supervision. 

374. Psychology of Coaching. T and II. 2 Hrs. Psychological principles under- 
lying present methods of coaching athletic sports. Laws of learning, cur- 
rent experiments, and selection of teaching material. Mr. Tork 

378.* Problems in Health and Physical Education. I, II, SI, and SII. 2 Hrs. Solu- 
tion of selected problems in health and physical education. Staff 



The School of Physical Education and Athletics 279 

389.* Tests in Health and Physical Education. II, SI, and SII. 2 Hrs. Anthro- 
pometric and functional tests in health and physical education. Staff 

396.* Seminar in Health and Physical Education. I and SI. 2 Hrs. Limited to 
advanced students who have had experience in this field and who have a 
fundamental knowledge of educational research. The Master's thesis may 
be initiated in this course. Staff 



Part IV 



Degrees Conferred by the University 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1945-46 

The following is a list of degrees conferred by the University during the 
year 1945-46. Degrees conferred on August 24, 1945, are indicated by an 
asterisk (*); those conferred on January 26, 1946, by a double asterisk (**). 
All other degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, June 3, 1946. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Helen Louise Ambler 
Nancy Lee Amos . . 
Liberty Marian Antalis 
Georgia Hazel Austin 
Jeanne Baker . . . 

**Marjorie Thomas Ballengee 
Dee Anne Bonsib . . . 
Eleanor Margaret Boyle 
William Brannan . . 

Anastasia Burns . . . 
William Forrest Carroll 
Amelita Velia Cartelle . 
Ramona Jean Chapman . 
Kathleen Carr Coleman . 
Robert Calton Cowan, Jr. 
*Fred John Coyer . . . 

**Katherine Ann Creel 
Martha Marie Cross . . 
Edna Kathleen Crummett 
Max Wayne Carl Cubbon 
Julia Lee DeBolt . . . 
Margaret Anne DeFazio 
*Annie Catherine Delp 
:: Maxine Deutsch . . 

**Marcus William Dodd 
Mary Ellin Duncan . 
Patricia Anne Duncan 
Mary Frances Dunlap 
Carolyn Ruth Eberly 
Janet Kay Echols . . 

**Guy Buele Epling . . 

Ruth Eskew .... 

Evelyn Ruth Fogle . 

Carol Leyman French 

*Irene Lucille Gallagher 



Mathematics . . . Morgantown 

History Wheeling 

English Weirton 

French Walton, N. Y. 

Psychology .... Morgantown 

Speech Beckley 

Psychology .... Scarsdale, N. 1 

Psychology .... Morgantown 

Pre-Medicine .... Morgantown 

History Coram, N. Y. 

Pre-Medicine . . . Morgantown 

Spanish Oak Hill 

Chemistry .... Chester 

Psychology .... Wheeling 

Pre-Medicine . . Morgantown 

English Lansing 

French Morgantown 

English Philippi 

English Harrisville 

English Clarksburg 

English Fairmont 

English Clarksburg 

English Mullens 

Speech - Charleston 

Physics Charleston 

Speech Morgantown 

Zoology Thomas 



Pre-Medicine 
Speech . . . 
English . . . 
Political Science 
Speech . . . 
Library Science 
Speech . . . 
Pre-Medicine 



Dorsey Carlyle Gamsjager . Pre-Medicine 



Saint Albans 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Lewisburg 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Welch 

Wheeling 

Grafton 



282 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



**Hettie Jo Gates . . . 

Lela Glassberg .... 

Virginia Ruth Godfrey . 

♦Paul Edwin Gordon . . 

William Fred Gott . . 

*Janis Gover 

Margaret Ann Gower . 

James Alexander Graham 

*Robert Greco .... 

** Frank Tod Griffith . . 

♦♦Michael Gussie .... 

"Thomas Brock Hardman 

Wilda Jean Harold . . 

Howard Thomas Hughes, Jr 

* Ernest Quentin Hull . . 
Marjorie Ann Ice . . . 

** Florence Olivia Isenberg 
♦Thomas Richards Johns II 

Marjorie Ruth Jones . 
*Harold Oliver Kamons 
♦James Staats Kessel . 
♦Mary Katherine Kincaid 

Laeh Klein .... 

* Lucille Mary Kraus . 
Alice Clare Leach . . 
Barbara Leigh Lemley 
Richard Allen Lewis . 

**Leo John Littman, Jr. 
Helen Elizabeth Loar 
Jeanne Trevillian Lough 
Huston Thomas Lyttleton 
Peggy Nelson McClung . 
Margaret J. Rardin MeConnell 
Robert Mullen McCune, Jr 
John Howard McCutcheon 
Robert Gayle McQuain 
** Ralph Miller . . . 
Agnes Mary Minor . 

*Floy Jack Moore . . 

♦William C Morgan, Jr. 
William Richard Morgan 
Louise Lorentz Muffly 

♦David Walker Mullins 
Martha Jo Murray . . 

♦Joseph Morton Natterson 
Lena Irene Orlandi . 
**Milton Merrele Ostroff 

♦Ernest Franklin Pauley 



Psychology . 
Sociology 
Psychology . 
Pre-Medicine 
Economics 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
P re-Law . . 
Pre-Medicine 
.Political Science 
History . . 
Pre-Medicine 
Art .... 
Chemistry 
Pre-Medicine 
Speech . . 
Sociology . 
Pre-Medicine 
Spanish . . 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
S/ociology 
Political Science 
Psychology . 
English . . 
Pre-Medicine 
Economics 
Library Science 
History . . 
Political Science 
Art .... 
Speech . . 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Law 
Zoology . . 
Chemistry 
English . . 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
Sociology 
Pre-Medicine 
French . . 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Medicine 
Economics 



Charleston 

Linden, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Fairmont 

Clarksburg 

Everettville 

Saint Albans 

Everettville 

Morgantown 

Harrisville 

Rices Landing, Pa. 

Charleston 

Parkersburg 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Parkersburg 

Ripley 

Summersville 

Morgantown 

Great Neck, N. Y. 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Charleston 

Albert 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Martinsburg 

Chester 

Morgantown 

Green Bank 

Walkersville 

Saint George 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Welch 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Logan 

Clarksburg 

Wheeling 

Ashford 

Charleston 

Charleston 



Baccalaureate Decrees Conferred, 1945-4G 



283 



Dorothy Marie Puffinberger 

Florence Marjorie Quinn 
*Jean Reycroft .... 
♦Raymond J. Reynolds . 
*Robert Earl Richard . . 

Elizabeth Ann Riggs . . 

William McDaniel Schaeffer 

Aaron Maurice Schwartz 
* Emerson Grant Shannon 

Charlotte Shapiro . . . 

Tony Wright Shillingburg 

Artha Jane Shutts . > 

Carl Ellsworth Slaughter 

Cody Lane Smith . . 

♦Gene Hope Smith . . 

*Mary Ash worth Smith 

• ;: *Mary Kathryn Smith 

Vivian Hall Smith . . 

Margaret Patricia Speissegger 
*Richard George Stansbury . 

Barbara Bennett Stathers 
*Donald Karl Stockdale . 

Emmy Henrietta Sturken 

Ara Long Sumney . . . 
**Darrel Harold William 
Burl Tallman .... 

Ann Elliott Taylor . . 

Orville Harold Taylor . 

Harry Ernst Walkup . . 

Virgie Rowles Wallace . 

Nancy Louise Wooster . 

Frank Roy Yoke, Jr. . . 

Nancy Juliana Zinn . . 



French . . 

Mathematics 

E otany . . 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Medicine 

Psychology 

Journalism . 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Medicine 

Sociology 

Sociology 

Pre-Medicine 

Political Science 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Medicine 

Art . . . , 

Psychology 

Economics 

History 

Pre-Medicine 

Zoology 

Pre-Law . 



Political Science 
Sociology 
Economics 
Pre-Medicine 
English . . 
Speech . . 
Pre-Law 
Speech . . 



Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Monessen, Pa. 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

New York, N. Y 

Welch 

Keyser 

Bismarck 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Beckley 

Glenville 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Closter, N. J. 

Pine Grove 

Ridgeley 
Charleston 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mount Hope 
Belle 

Morgantown 
Parkersburg 
Wheeling 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Business Administration) 

James David Bailey Bluefield 

Anna Mary Bowling White Sulphur Springs 

Wesley Craft Brashear Morgantown 

Margaret Alice Collins Grafton 



Willa Printz Copenhaver 



Grafton 



George Thomas Dodd Moorefield 

Donald Dean Franz Morgantown 

Betty Lewis Gates Charleston 

Mary Jane Holden Wheeling 

Richard Paul Hutchinson Fairmont 

**Robert Morris Kerns Bridgeport 

Helen Marie Ketchum Wayne 

Blanche Leonard Parkersburg 



284 Hkgrees Conferred by the University 

**Eleanor Lenore McComas Huntington 

Tommie Ballard McCoy Peterstown 

George Lyle McQuistion Morgantown 

Dorothea Mae Smith Morgantown 

Flora Jane Stewart Charleston 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Chemistry) 

John Minge Boiling Huntsville, Ala. 

Thelma Louise Cain Fairmont 

Mary Elizabeth Forman Clarksburg 

Dora Lee Harris Chester 

Jean Anita Long Morgantown 

Betty Lanier Watson Thomas 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Social Work) 

Malmarie Beveridge Morgantown 

Acacia Bernice Crowell Charleston 

Carolyn Mary Earnshaw Glen Dale 

Martha Jane Fleming Clarksburg 

Ruth Ann Fundis Wheeling 

Rebecca Lee Hughes Charleston 

Carolyn Nell Reed . . •• Glenville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Edward Nolan Adams Tyler, Texas 

Regina Margaret Barberia . Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1943 

♦Richard Waitman Berry Flatwoods 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

♦Elmond LeMoyne Coffield Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Lee Roy Minor Conn Blacksville 

Albert James Davis, Jr Danville, Va. 

Nevea Ilda Donell Weirton 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Edward Arnold Felder Norwich, Conn. 

A. B., University of Miami, 1945 

♦Emil Joseph Ferrara Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

*Vernetta Eileen Fike Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

Paul Edwin Gordon Clarksburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

*Ray Silvio Greco Fairmont 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Robert Greco Everettville 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

Thomas Brock Hardman Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

♦David Alonzo Haught, Jr Huntington 

B. S., Pharm., West Virginia University, 1943 

♦William Sawyers Herold Summersville 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1945-46 285 

Leonard Preston Hudnall Pratt 

B. <S., West Virginia Institute of Technology, 1945 
Ernest Quentin Hull Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University. 1945 

* Shelby Edward Jarrell Packsville 

William Eugene Kincaid Parkersburg 

* Clarence Archie Logue Newell 

*Louis Amadea Loria Hepzibah 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Ewing William McPherson Eerby, Va. 

B. S., Emory and HenryCollege, 1944 

Michael Judson Moore Killarney 

A. B., West Virginia University, 194 5 
*Margaret Agnes Morgan Eeckley 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
*Richard Young Morgan Mount Hope 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
William C Morgan, Jr. . . . Welch 

A. B., West Virginia University, 194 5 
David Walker Mullins Logan 

A. B., West Virginia University. 1945 
*Karl Johnson Myers, Jr. Philippl 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
Joseph Morton Natterson Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

Albert Edward O'Hara Weston 

B. a, West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1944 

*Frank McDonald Peck Logan 

A. B., West Virginia University, 194 3 
*James William Peck Summersvillt 

"William Allan Phillips Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

*Robert Martin Poske Indianapolis, Ind 

B. S. (Chem. ), West Virginia University, 1944 

Raymond J. Reynolds Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 
Robert Earl Richard Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 
John Thomas Rodgers Wellsburg 

*Eugene Philip Salvati Holden 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Warren Glea Sarrell .... Ellijay, Ga. 

Richard Samuel Stephens Bluefield 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Donald Karl Stockdale Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

*Leon Stutzman Shepherdstown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

*Roy Sherman Temeles Weirton 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
*Charles Woodrow Thacker Philippi 

*James Alpha Thompson Clarksburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
Clarence Vincent Townsend Martinsburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

*Carl Christopher Tully Charleston 

B. S., Morris Harvey College, 1937 



28 6 Degrees Conferred by the University 
♦William Nelson Walker, Jr Clarksburg 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1943 

* William Tilden Williams Beckley 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Robert Clark Wingfield Elkins 

A. B., West Virginia University, 11)4 4 

Robert Gerald Wysong Clarksburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 194 4 

BACHELOR OF LAWS 

Mat Daniel Bouldin, Jr Burnwell 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1939 
**Leo Bridi Lester 

James Wesley Gilmer Matoaka 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1941 
John Grant Hackney Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1941 
Peter Woodrow Hendricks Orgas 

A. B., New River State College, 1939 
Franklin William Kern Charleston 

A. B., Morris Harvey College, 1940 
Robert Franklin Martin Shinnston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1933 
M. S., West Virginia University, 1934 
George Willis May Fairmont 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
Isaac Raymond Murphy Philippi 

A. B., Concord State Normal School, 1925 

A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1930 
♦♦Vance Evans Sencindiver Martinsburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 
♦♦Charles Vincent Wehner Chester 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1943 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Edward Peter Bartkus Thomas 

B. S. (Oh. E. Elect.), West Virginia University, 1941 

♦♦Benjamin Goldman Weirton 

James Simms Miller Saint Albans 

Dickran Avedis Tefankjian North Bergen, N. J. 

**Mary Lawson Williams Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

♦♦Anthony Carl Colangelo Pittsburgh, Pa. 

♦♦John Joseph Ridge way Point Marion, Pa. 

Harry Allen Talbott Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Electrical Engineering Electives) 

♦♦Arthur Ernest Previll Rand 

BACHELOR OF SCiENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Charles Eugene Brockmeyer Charleston 

A. B., Marshall College, 1933 

B. S. (Eng. Elect.), West Virginia University, 1934 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1945-46 287 

George Sturgiss Chadwick, Jr Fairmont 

Jack Evans Crumpler 

Richard Henry Gabriel Fairmont 

Charles Franklin Peer Charles Town 

**Harley Gordon Pyles Fairmont 

Fred Jacob Seiler, Jr Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Oliver Teays Burgess Saint Albans 

Herbert Taylor DeRigo Star City 

Stanford Fertig Marlinton 

George Riley Fortney Enterprise 

Junior Darle L/ouke Mill Creek 

Hobert Kenneth Nicholson Avon 

Jules Vincent Powell Clarksburg 

Shannon Panter Scott Princeton 

♦Charles Leon Smith Ravenswood 

♦♦Don-aid Kenneth Summers Charleston 

Charles William Stemple Aurora 

♦Elwood Alex Wagoner Springfield 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Doris Spray Belt Troy 

Martha Jean Blake Saint Marys 

Ruth Pendleton Boggs Franklin 

Mary Lenore Boyles Clarksburg 

Glenda Gene Callahan Camden-on-Gauley . 

Jayne Catherine Carder Morgantown 

Dorothy Elizabeth Cox ,. Huttonsville 

Cecelia Debendarfer Grafton 

♦♦Mary Louise Elmore Tariff 

Ernestine Lewis Ferguson Morgantown 

♦♦Lena Jo Hauldren Hamlin 

Mary Kathleen Headlee Morgantown 

Martha Jeanne Hopkins Cameron 

♦♦Delores Grace Kappos Wheeling 

♦Lucille Hosey La wall Morgantown 

Ruth Virginia Lee Clarksburg 

Bree Coffindaffer Morecraft Gassaway 

Mary Bishoff Orr Morgantown 

♦Sylvia Hall Phillips Philippi 

♦♦Mary Lois Price Bridgeport 

Betty Louise Pyle Morgantown 

Marjorie Ann Ramsey Logan 

Elizabeth Jane Randal Williamson 

♦♦Geraldine Winifred Reed Newburg 

Jane Ann Roll Charleston 

June Rose Simmons Clarksburg 



288 Degrees Conferred by the University 

**Joanna Violet Strosnider Elacksville 

**Betty Jo Sullivan Pennsboro 

Zillah Hortence Taylor . Newburg 

Beulah Grace Wilson Brandonville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

Roland Dyer Cowger Fort Seybert 

Percy Fonce Deverick Walton 

Donald Hall Lough Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Gerlanda Vincenza Amato Pemberton 

**Barbara Vossler Eabb Maysville 

Daisy Walters Bell Morgantown 

**Mary Matilda Calemine Keyser 

*Agnes Dicken Cannon Levels 

*Barbara Watkins Dent Morgantown 

Marjorie Smith Durling Philippi 

Mary Eleanor Gibson Charleston 

Nancy Annice Hamilton Fhilippi 

*Thelma Shreeves Houldsworth Charleston 

Emily Flint Humphries Hinton 

Betty Hermine Landau Charleston 

Mildred Lazich Weirton 

** Margaret Newlon Montgomery Tunnelton 

Megan Eleanor Pritchard Morgantown 

Albert Roy Raines Riverton 

**James Nutter Rice Elkins 

Helen Mae Sheffer . * Charleston 

Margaret Ladriere Smith Pennsboro 

Mary Jane Webster Martinsburg 

BACHELOR IN SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

Mary Theresa Angotti Morgantown 

Mary Virginia Dent Grafton 

Frances Mayfield Montagna Morgantown 

B. S. H. E., West Virginia University, 194 

**George Bowers Rice Shinnston 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1939 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Virginia Lindsey Boyles Philippi 

*Antonetta Constance Canacari Morgantown 

*Bernelle Virginia Davidson Hagerstown, Md. 

Frank George DeVincent Morgantown 

Dorothy Lee Glover Burton 

♦Ann Davis Hewitt Harrisville 

^Robert William Hill Morgantown 



Graduate Degrees Conferred, 1945-4C 28.) 

Ellenor Jean McCrady Clay 

Eleanor Spangler Noland ■ Morgantown 

Helen Vesta Robinett Wayne 

Helen Florence Rogerson Clarksburg 

**Helen Ann Stobinsky Oak Hill 

Dorothy Eloise Wildman Morgantown 

Mary Elizabeth Wiles Fairmont 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OF MINES 

Robert Moore Lewis Otsego 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

June Hope Burford Charleston 

Robert Rollie Dutton Morgantown 

*Doris Eleanor Dye Elkins 

**Betty Elaine Johnson Everettville 

Josephine Elizabeth Kelly Morgantown 

Yvonne Auvil Lowther Booth 

William Newton McGee, Jr Morgantown 

Natalie Blair Pembroke Grafton 

Sylvia Belle Price Marmet 

Lilly Maxine Ward Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN JOURNALISM 

Sarah Louise Arnett In wood 

Charles Wesley Edgar, Jr New Martinsville 

*Emma Josephine Hill Charleston 

Marjorie Lamb Fairmont 

Emma Woodyard Laughlin Spencer 

**Mary Elizabeth Roles Lillybrook 

Dixie Irene Smith Parkersburg 

Sarah Jeanne Smith Wheeling 

**Nicha Soure White Sulphur Springs 

CHEMICAL ENGINEER 

*Randolph C. Specht Knoxville, Tenn. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

*Henry Sheldon Areford . . . Education . . . Morgantown 

A. B., "West Virginia University, 1927 

Claire Burns Bailey .... Education . . . Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1921 

*Nellie Rozella Baliker . . . Education . . . Star City 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1942 

*Wanda Netau Beall .... English .... Uffington 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1927 

*Juanita Shahan Blackburn . English .... Saint George 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1941 

*William Thomas Blankenship Education . . . Gauley Bridge 

A. B. in Ed., Concord College, 1943 

*Edith Blumert English .... Hollidays Cove 

B. S. Ed., West Virginia University, 1941 

♦Josephine Jentes Brickels . English .... Morgantown 
B. S. Ed., Ohio State University, 1929 



290 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



*Edward Bridi Education . . . Lester 

A. B. in Ed., Concord State Teachers College, 1933 
**Ruby Florence Bright . . . Education . . . Dunbar 
A. B., West Virginia University, 1917 

*James Kenna Burke .... Political Science . Newburg 
A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1932 



Jacob Ernest Campbell . . . Education 

LL. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

♦*Francis Michael Casey . . . Education 

B. S. in Ed., Fordham University, 1929 

♦Justus Arthur Deahl .... Education 

A. B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 

Henry Clinton Fike .... Education 



Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Tunnelton 



192G 



Morgantown 



A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1940 



♦Clyde Foley Education 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College 
*Delbert Excell Gilmore . . . Education . . 

B. S. Ed., University of Cincinnati, 1939 
♦Morris Jacob Haller .... Education . . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1917 
Verona Clayton Haller . . . Education . . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1923 
♦Curtis Langford Harbert . . Education . . 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College 
♦Elinore Scott Hutchinson . . Education . . 

A. B., West Virginia University. 1921 
*Victorine Augusta Louistall . Education . . 

B. S. Bus. Ad., West Virginia State College, 1936 

♦Elouise Postlethwaite McCoy Education . . . Akron, Ohio 
A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1934 
♦♦Summers Dailey McCrum, Jr. History .... 
A. B. in El. Ed., Shepherd College, 1941 
Blanche Jean McQuiston . . Education . . . 
A. B., West Virginia University, 1939 

♦♦Ollie Mayhall Education . . . 

A. B., West Liberty State Teachers College, 193' 
♦Webster Earl Miller .... Education . . . 
A. B., West Virginia University, 1928 
Myrtle Alice Phares .... Education . . . 
A. B. in El. Ed., Davis and Elkins College, 1937 

Verdie Phares Education . . . Morgantown 

A. B. in El. Ed., Davis and Elkins College, 1937 
Harold Barr Proudfoot . . . Education . . . Grantsville 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

*Otis Kermit Rice Education . . . Hugheston 

B. S. in El. Ed., Morris Harvey College, 1943 
A. B., Morris Harvey Coiiege, 1944 

:!: Georgia Anthony Roller . . . Political Science . Charleston 

A. B. in Ed., Morris Harvey College, 1932 

♦Kate Meredith Roller .... Education . . . Morgantown 
A. B., West Virginia University, 1916 

Kenneth Charles Schubel . . Economics . . . Irvington, N. 
A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

♦Cecil Rosco Shrewsberry . . Education . . . Odd 
A. B. in Ed., Concord State Teachers College, 1941 

Genevieve Poland Smell . . . Education . . . Morgantown 

A. B.. West V : rginia University, 1917 

Joseph Franklin Snider . . . History .... Grafton 
A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1937 



Bruceton Mills 
1938 
. Hundred 



Morgantown 
Morgantown 

Madison 

1936 
Sandyville 

Clarksburg 



Kingwood 
Morgantown 
Moundsville 
Terra Alta 
Morgantown 



Graduate Degrees Conferred, 11)45-4(5 291 



Spencer 

!, 1935 

Cairo 

. Mount Hope 

. Cassville 

. Madison 

. Morgantown 



**Mary E. Williams Tamplin . Education . . . Racine 

B. S. Ed., West Virginia University, 1936 
**Sigel Elridge Taylor .... Education 

A. B. in Ed., Glenville State Teachers Coil* 
♦Opal Gertrude Vincent . . . Education 

A. B., West Virginia University. 1926 
♦Andrew Lawrence Walker . . Education 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1928 
♦Leo Walter Watkins .... Education 

B. S. Ed., West Virginia University, 1940 
♦Warren Stewart Way .... Education 

A. B., Georgetown College, 1935 
♦♦Margaret S. Willard .... Education 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1937 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 
Russell Clarke Butler . . . Vocational Agr. . Morgantown 

B. S. Agr., West Virginia University, 1930 

Wilbert Franklin Chambers . Zoology .... Weirton 

A. B., West Virginia University, 19 4 5 
Donald Wayne Eicher . . . Physical Education Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1937 

Lemuel Goode Animal Husbandry Saulsville 

B. S. Agr., West Virginia University, 1942 

Harry Richard Lothes . . . Physical Education Dunbar 

B. S. P. E , West Virginia University, 1940 
Thomas Roy Manley .... Genetics .... Fairmont 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1940 
♦Zoila Reyes-Galvis Chemistry . . . ^ogota, Colombia 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1945 

♦♦John Semon Physical Education Morgantown 

B. S. P. E., West Virginia University, 193S 

Charles Roy Shirley .... Vocational Agr. . Berkeley Springs 

B. S. Agr., West Virginia University, 1941 
Genevieve Fike Ward . . . Physical Education Morgantown 

B. S. P. E., West Virginia University, 1941 
Charity Wheeler White . . . Physical Education Bridgeport 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1938 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

♦Donald Thompson Worrell Morgantown 

B. S. E. E., West Virginia University. 1940 

MASTER OF SCIENCE (Home Economics Education) 
♦Vada Kathryn Atha Barrackville 

A. B. in Ed., Fairmont State Teachers College, 1939 

♦♦Mabel Sidell Spencer New Martinsville 

B. S. H. E., West Virginia University, 1925 

MASTER OF MUSIC 

♦Emma Jane Rhodes Point Marion, Pa. 

B. Mus. in Piano, West Virginia University, 1942 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OF MINES 

Fred Rees Toothman Hepzibah 

B. S. E. M., West Virginia University, 1941 

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE OF SOCIAL WORK 

Nancy Brokaw Ebeling Wheeling 

B. S. (Social Work), West Virginia University, 194 5 

Mary June Gilbert Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1944 

Robert Burr James Morganville 

A. B., Salem College, 1945 



292 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



DEGREES CONFERRED 1870-1946 

Bachelor's Degrees 



< 


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PQ 


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2* 

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2 

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6 

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3 

3 

CQ 

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3 

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CO 

PQ 


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£ 

GO 

PQ 




t*. 
CO 

CQ 


a 

§ 

—a 

CO 

PQ 


m 
3 



1870 


1 

1 
4 
7 
7 
6 
3 
7 
5 
2 
2 
3 
7 
9 
3 
4 
5 
2 
4 
9 
6 
8 
6 
12 
8 
10 
8 
. 11 
9 

12 

. 46 

. 30 

25 

. 29 

28 

20 

18 

32 

20 

27 

. 27 

. 27 

. 27 

28 

28 

. 35 

. 40 

. 62 

. 40 

42 

. 79 

. 93 

56 

. 125 

. 130 

. 132 

169 

198 

. 211 

. 230 

264 

252 

. 209 

. 233 

. 216 

. 202 

214 

. 239 

. 249 

. 230 

. 192 

218 

. 219 

. 169 

. 108 

. 101 

116 

b 5666 






































1 


1871 


1 












































2 


187? 












































4 


1873 


6 












































13 


1874 












































7 


1875 


6 
2 

1 
1 
2 












































7 


187fi 












































9 


1877 












































9 


1878 












































6 


187Q 


1 
2 










































4 


1880 










































6 


1881 










































a 


188? 


2 
3 

3 

1 
1 

"3 

6 
4 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
2 
5 
2 
1 

"2 
3 

4 

3 
6 
5 
12 
9 
13 
25 
8 
9 
8 
11 
22 
29 
48 
47 
43 
53 
58 
55 
48 
49 
42 
42 
54 
52 
48 
54 
43 
23 
17 
24 
30 
57 
53 
54 
57 
58 
83 

1424 


1 
5 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
7 










































10 


1883 










































17 


1884 










































9 


1885 










































13 


1886 










































13 


1887 










































11 


1888 










































13 


1889 










































19 


1890 










































12 


1891 


14 
18 
11 
23 
24 
35 
44 
18 
40 
9 
9 

17 
10 
8 
22 
17 
12 
8 
2 
12 
12 
17 
15 
12 
14 
9 

16 
5 
2 
16 
12 
17 
20 
18 
26 
26 
37 
35 
42 
42 
40 
42 
45 
32 
29 
44 
30 
37 
35 
34 
30 
28 
9 
6 
4 
11 

1259 










































26 


189? 


4 

5 
5 
3 

"2 

6 
7 








































30 


1893 








































30 


1894 












1 




























39 


1895 






































41 


1896 












1 




























48 


1897 










5 

1 


























66 


1898 










1 
1 
2 
2 

1 


1 
























45 


189q 


1 
































66 


1900 
































58 


1901 


3 
8 
6 
2 
4 
9 

14 
6 

15 
7 
6 
9 
3 
4 
8 
2 
5 
4 

ii 

7 
7 
4 
9 

14 
19 
13 
7 
8 
7 
9 
11 
8 
5 
7 
13 
6 
7 
7 
5 
3 
6 
2 
9 

1 

355 




































45 


190? 


2 

2 
3 

6 
4 
6 
4 
5 
7 
9 
1 

4 
2 
4 

2 
5 
5 
8 
8 
3 
5 
7 
3 
7 
2 
4 
7 
7 
5 
9 
8 
5 
10 

19 
13 
19 
9 
11 
6 
7 

269 


































54 


1903 




































48 


1904 




































42 


1901 




































S3 


190fi 














3 

7 

1 

6 






















65 


1907 






























75 


1908 






























51 


190fl 




































56 


1910 










2 




















60 


1911 


2 








• 4 
12 
10 
17 

14 

18 

25 

22 

15 

22 

24 

18 

25 
24 
17 
33 
47 
50 
47 
33 
: 
2 
12 

744 
























68 


191? 


























84 


1913 


5 
1 

2 

"5 

7 
9 
2 
6 
11 
10 
7 
3 
3 
2 
5 
4 
4 

"7 

4 
5 
11 
9 

5 

8 

8 

.... 

149 


2 
5 

6 


























61 


1914 










1 






















76 


1915 


























102 


1916 
































80 


1917 














2 
17 
17 
25 
19 
28 
22 
39 
31 
32 
36 

40 

42 

45 
40 
30 

841 


















121 


1918 


4 
3 
5 
7 
6 
9 

18 
17 
9 

15 
17 
15 
24 
21 
17 

16 
20 
13 
11 
15 
18 
16 
15 
6 
17 
14 
4 
1 

3S4 




















85 


1919 






























76 


1920 














5 
10 
4 

3 


10 
11 
5 








2 






169 


1921 


2 
3 
4 
7 
6 
4 
7 
4 
5 
9 
7 
6 

10 
14 
26 
21 
19 
21 
31 
29 
24 
23 
17 
3 
5 

320 


1 
1 

3 

5 

3 

2 
.... 

27 
















199 


192? 
















194 


1923 






















294 


1924 
















1 






2q8 


1925 
















307 


1926 


1 






2 
3 






351 


1927 








394 


1928 














383 


192fl 












10 
14 


23 

25 

19 

37 

49 

30 
48 
32 

18 
19 
20 

542 




430 


1930 










1 

17 

26 

25 

20 

29 
28 
15 

12 

7 

10 

304 


2 

6 

7 

8 
7 
13 

6 

4 
4 

102 






482 


1931 










491 


1932 
1933 










479 

499 


1934 










439 


1935 


















455 


1936 










1 




6 

13 

8 
14 
17 

14 
9 

14 

109 






.503 


1937 














473 


1938 














500 


1939 










12 
11 

10 

1 
1 
3 

54 


15 
16 

11 

8 
9 

85 


51 y 


1940 














514 


1941 










587 


194^ 














552 


1943 














477 


1944 














344 


1945 














267 


1946 


13 


3 


34 


4 






329 


Total 


46 


46 


12858 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



293 



Master's Degrees 



YEAR 


A.M. 


M.S. 


LL. M. 


M.S. 
Agr 


M.S. 
C.E. 


M.S. 
M. E. 


M.S. 
Ch. E. 


M.S. i M.S. 
EM. ' E. E. 


M. 

Mus. 


Totals 


1873 


2 
4 
7 
2 
12 
3 
7 
5 
2 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 
5 
4 
1 
2 
















1 


1874 
















2 


1875 
















4 


1876 


5 


















12 


1877 


















2 


1878 




















12 


1879 


5 
2 


















8 


1880 


















9 


1881 


















5 


1882 


2 


















3 


1883 


















5 


1884 
















3 


1885 












:::::::::::::::: 






3 


1886 


3 
3 
4 














12 


1887 










:::;::::::::::::l:::::::: 




6 


1888 
















9 


1889 












::::::::::::::* 




4 


1890 


1 












; 




2 


1891 














2 


1892 


















1893 




















1894 


1 
















j 


1895 


















1896 


1 

1 
















1 


1897 


















1898 




1 













1 


1899 


3 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 














3 


1900 
















4 


1901 
















3 


1902 


1 














5 


1903 














4 


1904 




2 












6 


1905 .. 












2 


1906 
















2 


1907 .. 


















1908 .. 


6 
2 
3 

2 

2 
5 
5 




2 












3 


1909 












6 


1910 




1 












3 


1911 












3 


1912 




1 

2 












2 


1913 












4 


1914 












1 


1915 


1 


1 












4 


1916 


1 










6 


1917 .. 














5 


1918 .. 


2 




1 


1 








5 


1919 










1920 


4 
5 
11 

13 
15 
14 

21 
27 
30 
36 

39 

46 
51 
62 

94 
119 
110 
132 
125 
71 
28 
23 
44 


2 

2 
2 

2 
3 
3 

3 

5 

29 

19 
24 
23 

24 
22 
38 
39 
41 
14 
8 

13 














6 


1921 . . 














7 


1922 .. 














13 


1923 .. 








1 






• 15 


1924 




2 
3 

6 
5 
6 
3 










20 


1925 


2 








22 


1926 




i 






32 


1927 




1 


1 






36 


1928 


i 




41 


1929... 






i 








45 


1930 . 












76 


1931 




1 








72 


1932 






1 1 

1 2 




66 


1933 








4 




1934 






76 


1935 










2 




91 


1936 






1 




87 


1937 . 












1938 














118 


1939 






1 




.. 




144 


1940 .. 






i 

3 




156 


1941 

1942 








1 




1 


1 

2 

1 


178 
171 


1943 












86 


1944 . 












36 


1945 . . 














30 


1946 












1 1 


1 


60 
















Totals 


1494 


427 


10 


33 


11 


4 


34 8 7 5 


2033 



294 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



Doctor's Degrees 



Doctor of 
Philosophy 

1902 1 

1907 1 

1932 6 

1933 5 

1934 3 

1935 10 

1936 4 

1937 2 

1938 2 

1939 3 

1940 4 

1941 4 

1942 3 

1943 3 

1945 1 

TOTAL 52 



Professional Degrees 



05 
< 


1 
'Sb 

a 

o 


1 

d 
'S 

a 
H 

"3 

'= 

S3 


c 

c 
W 

"3 


u 
CJ 

a> 

e 

'it 

d 

m 

1 
'a 

o 


1 

i 

a 
'3 

a 


o 


1889 


3 

1 
1 










3 


1897 












1898 












1909 


1 


2 








1915 


3 

1 
1 








1918 












1920 












1921 


1 
...... 

1 










1924 


1 


1 






2 


1928 








1929 












1930 




1 








1932 


1 










1933 


1 










1934 




1 






1937 




1 






1938 


1 


2 

1 








1940 




1 
1 




1941 








1945 






1 






1946 






1 
















Totals 


14 


6 


8 


2 


2 


32 



Honorary Degrees 



H 

>< 


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03 

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o 
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1875.. 


1 












1 


1883 


2 


1 
1 
3 








3 
1 


1885. . 








1886. . 












3 
1 


1887. . 


..... 

1 

2 
1 

1 


1 

1 
2 

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2 








1888 


2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

" 1 
1 
15 
1 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 








4 


1889 








4 


1890 








3 


1891 








6 


1892 








4 


1893. . 










1894 


3 
1 


3 
1 


1 






7 


1896 






3 


1897. . 




1 
2 




2 


1919. . 






17 


1921. . 






1 


1928 












1 


1929. . 










3 


1932. . 












2 


1933. . 












2 


1934 












1 


1937. 












1 


1938. . 










1 


2 


1939 . 






1 




2 


1940 . 








1 


4 


1941. 










1 


1942 










1 


4 


1945 










1 












3 




Totals 


11 


16 


50 


2 


3 


85 



Classified Enrollment, 1946-47 



295 



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298 



Distribution of Enrollment 



THE GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF RESIDENT 

ENROLLMENT, 1946-47 

By States and Foreign Countries 



Alabama 2 

California 3 

Canada 1 

China 1 

Connecticut 3 

Costa Rica 1 

Czechoslovakia 2 

District of Columbia 5 

Florida 9 

France 1 

Honduras 1 

Illinois 9 

India 2 

Indiana 1 

Iowa 1 

Kentucky 5 

Louisiana 2 

Maryland 23 

Massachusetts 6 



Michigan 4 

Missouri 3 

Xew Jersey 27 

New Mexico 1 

Xew York 47 

North Carolina 4 

Ohio 48 

Pennsylvania 292 

Puerto Rico 6 

Rhode Island 1 

Texas 2 

Turkey 2 

Virginia 20 

Washington 2 

West Virginia 6794 

Wisconsin 2 

TOTAL 7333 



By West Virginia Counties 



Barbour « i 

Berkeley 15 

Boone 45 

Braxton 6S 

Brooke 88 

Cabell 95 

Calhoun 17 

Clay 52 

Doddridge 26 

Fayette 121 

Gilmer 37 

Grant 23 

Greenbrier 113 

Hampshire 32 

Hancock 150 

Hardy 19 

Harrison 507 

Jackson 67 

Jefferson 25 

Kanawha 697 

Lewis 88 

Lincoln 9 

Logan 108 

McDowell 99 

Marion 414 

Marshall 141 

Mason 22 

Mercer 107 

Mineral 56 



Mingo 62 

M onong alia 1524 

Monroe 20 

Morgan 22 

Nicholas 66 

Ohio 330 

Pendleton 23 

Pleasants 24 

Pocahontas bS 

Preston 221 

Putnam 2S 

Raleigh 158 

Randolph 93 

Ritchie 69 

Roane 73 

Summers 34 

Taylor 117 

Tucker 55 

Tyler 47 

Upshur 53 

Wayne 16 

Webster 34 

Wetzel 98 

Wirt 24 

Wood 152 

Wyoming 45 

TOTAL 6794 



INDEX 



Abbreviations 88 

Absences 60, 62 

Absentia work 59 

Academy of Science 86 

Accounting 146 

Administration. Council of 8 

Administration, Officers of 7-9 

Admission 42. 44, 47 

Admissions, Committee on 31 

Advanced standing 47 

Advertising-management curriculum 
236 

Adviser 50, 63 

Adviser: agriculture 93; arts and sci- 
ences 121; duties of 50. 63; educa- 
tion 45; fraternity 32; graduate 
work 228; home economics 110; 
sorority 32 

Aeronautical engineering 200, 218 

Agricultural biochemistry 98 

Agricultural economics 98 ^ 

Agricultural Mechanics 96 

Agricultural Experiment Station 25, 
89 

Agricultural Extension Divison 27, 90 

Agricultural Engineering 99 

AGRICULTURE. FORESTRY, AND 
HOME ECONOMICS, 'COLLEGE 
OF: 

Courses 97, 107. 114 
Courses credited toward A. B. de- 
gree 121 

Degree requirements 92 
General information 37, 89 
Science curriculum 91 
Two-year curriculum 92 

Agriculture 89, 97 

Agronomy 100 

Aid to students 71 

Anatomy 246 

Animal husbandry 101 

Animal pathology 102 

Applied arts 116 

Applied music 252 

Armory 35 

Arrangement of courses 89 

Art 134 

Arts and agriculture course 129 

Arts and law course 128 
Arts and medicine course 125 
ARTS AND SCIENCES. COLLEGE 
OF: 

Courses 132 
Degre requirements 121 

[ 



Electives in other colleges 121 
General information 37, 118 
Pre-profcssional courses 126 

Assemblies 64 

Assistant professors 14 

Assistants and technicians 20 

Associate professors 12 

Asocicted Women Students 65 

Associations 65, 81 

Athletics: council 30; staff 30; tro- 
phies 80; intramural 68; inter- 
collegiate 68 

Auditors 51 

B 

Baccalaureate degrees: conferred 281, 

292; list of 58; requirements for 

56 
Bachelor of Arts degree: arts and 

law 128; arts and medicine 125; 

combined courses 125; conferred 

281; regular course 122 
Bachelor of Laws degree: conferred 

286; requirements for 59, 242 
Bachelor of Music degree: conferred 

288; requirements for 59, 251 
Bachelor of Science degrees: combin- 
ed !23; conferred 284 
Bacteriology 104, 247 
Band, Eligibility for 64 
Band' instruments 258 
Baud music 39 
Banking and finance 145 
Bar, Admission to 243 
Biochemistry 247 
Biological sciences. Introductory 

course 133 
Biological Survey 86 
Biology 105, 134 
Board of Governors 6, 36 
Board of Governors scholarships, 

Committee on 31 
Board and lodging 41 
Book store 41 
Botany 136 
Broadcasting 41 
Buildings 35 

Business administration 142 
Business management 145 



Cafeteria 42 
Calendar 4, 5 
Campus, Map of 2 
Ceramic engineering 219 

299] 



300 



1nj>ex 



Certificate, Junior 120 

Certification of entrance units 43 

Certification regulation: see Note on 
page 183 

Chemical engineering 202, 219 

Chemistry 138 

Child care 117 

Church centers 65 

Civil engineering 204, 221 

Class advisers, see Advisers 

Class load 50 

Classical civilization 142 

Classics 140 

Classification of students 58 

Clothing 115 

Clubs 83 

Coal conference on combustion 197 

Coal mining 227 

Combined courses in two colleges 125, 
128, 129. 262 

Committee on scholarship. Duties of 
63 

Committees 30 

Concerts and recitals, Committee on 

251 
Conditional admission 46 
Conditions 61 
Conservation 96, 102 
Contents, Table of 3 
Convocation 64 

Correspondence work, Credit for 48 
Costs 52-55 

Council of Administration 8, 36 
Council, Graduate 8 
Council, Student 64 
Courses of instruction 89 
Credits, Definition of: college 49; en- 
trance 43 
Credits required for baccalaureate de- 
gree: all colleges 58 
Curricular requirements 88 



Dairy husbandry 102 

Dairy manufactures 95 

Dean of women 64 

Degrees. Baccalaureate 56 

Degrees, Classification of 58 

Degrees conferred, 1870-1946; bache- 
lor's 292; doctor's 294; honorary 
294; master's 293 

Degrees conferred 281 

Degrees, General regulations concern- 
ing 55 

Degree, Graduate 59, 229 

Degres in: See under name of college 
or school 

Degrees, Professional 60 



Degrees, Resident requirements for: 
graduate 229; undergraduate 57 

Degrees, Undergraduate 56 

Delinquent students 62 

Demonstration high school 23, 181 

Deposits 54 

Description of the University 33 

Director of student afairs 64 

Discipline 61 

Dispensary 69 

Doctor's degree requirements 231 

Doctor's degrees conferred 294 

Dormitories 9, 41 

DraA\iug 225 

Duties of advisers, of Committee on 
Scholarship, of instructors 63 



Economics and business administra- 
tion 142 
EDUCATION, COLLEGE OF: 
Admission 45, 182 
Courses 183 

Degree requirements 182 
General information 37, 181 
Graduate professional curricula 
188 

Laboratory Elementary School 181 
University High School 23, 35, 181 

Elective units 43 

Electrical engineering 206, 223 

Eligibility in activities 64 
University Band 64 

Em bryology 247 

Employment service 71 

ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 
ARTS, COLLEGE OF: 
Courses 218 

Courses credited toward A. B. de- 
gree 121 

Degree requirements 198 
Extension in industrial sciences 
196 

General information 37, 193 
Mining extension 29, 196 

Engineering Experiment Station 2S. 
195 

English: courses 152; honors 151 

Enrollment, Summary of 295 

Enrollment, Geography of 298 

Ensemble courses 258 

Entomology 103 

Entrance 43 

Examination, Medical 49 

Examinations 60 

Exemptions, Military 38 

Expenses 52-55 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 25, 



Index 



(01 



89; Engineering 28, 195 

Extension courses in agriculture 90; 
arts and sciences 130; mining and 
industrial education 196: hoim 
economics 90; University 130 

Extei sion staff; agricultural 27; in- 
dustrial and mining 29 

Extension, Standing Committee on 
University SI; organization of 40; 
collegiate grade 55 



Faculty. University; according to rank 
9; Graduate 36; organizations ^4 

failure in course 61 

Farms. Department 35 

Farm and Home Week 90 

Farm, practice 98 

Fees 52-55 

Fellows 20 

Food and nutrition 114 

Forestry 106-109 

Foundation of University 33 

Foundations, Religious 65 

Fraternities 83 

Fraternity advisers 32 

Fraternity scholastic records. Com- 
mittee on 31 

French 169 

Full-lime student fees 52 

Funds 35 



Gas engineering 214 

Gas measurement short course 196 

General engineering 225 

General information 33 

Genetics 101 

Geography 156 

Geological and Economic Survey 86 

Geological engineering 214 

Geological, mineralogy, and geogra- 
phy 154 

German 156 

Gifts 72 

Governing boards 6, 36 

Government associations. Student 64 

Government of the University 36 

Grades. Reports on 61 

Grading, System of 56 

Graduate assistants 20 

Graduate Council 8 

Graduate degrees 59 

GRADUATE SCHOOL: 
Admission 47 
Council 8 
Degrees 59. 229 
Faculty 36 
General regulations 228 



Greek 142 
Grounds 35 



H 



Health education 275 

Health and child care 117 

Health Service, Student 8, 69 

High School. University Rural Staff 

23; work of 181 
Histology 247 

History of the University 33 
History 157 
Home economics 109-117; education 

117 
Home economics in Arts and Sciences 

curriculum 159 
Home management 117 
Donor points 56 
Honor societies 81 
Honorary degrees conferred 294 
Horticulture 104 
Hospital service 69 
Humanities course 132 



In absentia work 59 

Industrial engineering 225 

Industrial extension staff 29 

Industrial pharmacy 261 

Infirmary 35. 69 

Institutions associated with the Uni- 
versity 86 

Instruction staff 9 

Instructional policies and practices. 
Committee on 31 

Instructors. Duties of 63: List of 17 

Intercollegiate athletics 58 

Interfraternity scholarship trophy 80 

Institution management 115 

Interpretation 179 

Intramural athletics 67 

Introductory courses 132 

Italian 170 



JOURNALISM, SCHOOL OF: 

Admission 45. 233 

Courses 238 

Degree requirements 234 

General information 37. 232 
Junior certificate 120 



Laboratory Elementary School 24, 181 

Laboratory deposits 54 

Languages and literatures: Classics 

141; English 150: German 156: 

Romance 168 



302 



Index 



Late registration 50 

Latin 141 

Latin America. Committee on 32 

LAW, COLLEGE OF: 
Admission 44 
Advanced standing- 47 
Combined course 128 
Courses 239 

General information 37, 239 
Students in other colleges ad- 
mitted to law course 243 

Law Quarterly, West Virginia 243 

Lecturers 20 

Library Science 160 

Library 39; standing committee 32; 
staff 24 

Living accommodations 41 

Loan funds 76 

Location of the University 34 

Lodging 41 

Lower division, College of Arts and 
Sciences 122 

M 

Machine design and construction 225 

Marketing and merchandising 145 

Marking system 56 

Marriages, Student 63 

Master's degrees conferred 289, 293 

Master's degrees, requirements for 230 

Mathematics 161 

Maximum and minimum work 50 

Mechanical enginering 210, 225 

Mechanics 227 

Medals 81 

Medical examination 49 

Medical service 69 

Medical technology 130 

Medicine 249 

MEDICINE, SCHOOL OF: 

Admission 45 

Combined coursts 125 

Courses 246 

Degree requirements 245 

Fees 53 

Genera] information 37, 244 
Men's dormitory 35, 41 
Metallurgy 220 
Mid-semester reports 60 
Military band 39 
Military Science and Tactics, Division 

of: administration and instruction 

37; courses in 250; staff 30 
Mineralogy 154 
MINES, SCHOOL OF: 

Courses 227 

Courses credited toward A. B. de- 
gree 121 

Degree requirements 212 

General information 37, 194 



Mining extension 29, 196 

Mining engineering 212, 227 

MUSIC SCHOOL OF: 
Admission 46 
Advanced standing 48 
Concerts and recitals 41 
Courses 256 

Courses credited toward A. B. de- 
gree 121 

Degree requirements 251 
Fees 53-54 
General information 37, 251 

Music organizations 41 



N 



Neuro-anatomy 246 

Numbering courses. Plan for 50, 88 

News-editorial curriculum 235 



Obstetrics 249 

Oticers of the University 7, 8 

Oil and gas engineering 214 

Orchestra, University 41, 83 

Orchestral instruments 258 

Organization of the colleges, schools. 

and divisions 36 
Organizations and societies 80, 83, 84, 

86 



Part-time student fees 52 

Pathology 248 

Petroleum engineering 214 

Pharmacists register 72 

Pharmacology 248 

PHARMACY, COLLEGE OF: 
Advanced standing 48 
Combined courses 261, 262 
Courses 264 

Degree requirements 260 
Fees 53 
General information 37, 260 

Pharmacy, University 69 

Philosophy 164 

Physical education, service programs 
67, 269, 270 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATH- 
LETICS, SCHOOL OF: 
Courses 272 

Courses credited toward A. B. de- 
gree 121 

Degree requirements 267 
General information 37. 266 
Intramural athletics 67, 63 
Service programs 67, 269, 270 

Physical plant 35 



Index 



303 



Physical sciences, introductory coursr 

133 
Physical training- 67 
Physics 165 
Physiology 247 
Piano 257 
Pipe organ 258 

Placement bureau, Teacher 72 
Placement guidance 71 
Plant pathology 104 
Political science 166 
Portuguese 171 
Poultry husbandry 102 
Power engineering 225 
Practice court 241 
Practice teaching 181 
Predental courses 125 
Preeducation adviser 181 
Preeriucation course 127 
Pie-journalism course 127 
Pre-law couse 128 
Pre-meclical course 124 
Pre-nursing curriculum 126 
Preprofessional social work 127 
Prescribed and elective units 43 
Prizes 77; standing committee on 31 
Probation rules 62 

Professional curricula. Graduate 1SS 
Professional degrees in engineering 

60 
Professional societies 83 
Professors 9 

Professors, Assistant, 14 
Professors, Associate 12 
Psychology 162 
Public exercises and entertainment?. 

Committee on 31 
Public hygiene 247 
Public-school music 255 
Public speaking 179 
Publications, Student: Committee on 

3} ; list of 85 
Publications, University: Committee 

on 22; list of 85 



Radio, Committeee on 31; courses 179 

Real estate and insurance 146 

Rec-tals 41 

Recreation 68, 275 

Re-entry after withdrawal 51 

Refunding of fees 55 

Registration 49 

Registration fees 52 

Religious foundations and societies 65 

Requirements for degrees 55; see "De- 
gree" under name of college or 
school 

Reports 6i 



Research: Graduate Council 8; ; Grad 
uate School 230; Committee on 32 

Residence requirements; Graduate 
School 229; undergraduate col- 
leges and schools 57 

Residence halls 9 

Retail pharmacy 261 

Return of books to Library 51 

Romance languages and literatures 
168 

Rooms and boarding places 41 

Ruler and regulations 61 

Rural organization 105 

Russian 171 



Sanitary engineering 204 222 

Schedules 88 

Scholarship, College committees on 32 

Scholarships 72 

Scholastic standing 56 

Secretarial studies 145 

Senate 36; committees of 31 

Service programs in physical educa- 
tion 67, 269, 270 

Short courses and special schools 90 

Social center for women 64 

Social life of students 67 

Social sciences, Introductory course 
133 

Social work 171; pre-professional 127 

Societies 65, 83 

Societies, Honor 81 

Sociology 175 

Soils 100 

Sororities 32 

Sorority scholastic records: Commit- 
tee on 31 

Space allocation, Committee on 31 

Spanish 170 

Special admission requirements 44 

Special fees 53 

Special students 46 

Speech 177; correction 180 

Staff of instruction, research, and ex- 
tension 7-30 

Standing, Ad\anced 47 

Standing committees: college 32; Uni- 
versity 30 

State Road Commission laboratory 87 

Student activities 64, 80-82 

Student affairs, Committee on 30, 36; 
director of 64 

Student aid 71 

Studeat center G4 

Student concerts 29 

Student Council 64 

Student deans 64 

Student health service 8, 69 



304 



Index 



Student marriage 63 

Student organizations 65, S3; Commit- 
tee on 31 

Student placement 71 

Student publications 85 

Student social life 67 

Student, teaching 185 

Student welfare 64 

Substitution for required courses 51 

Summary of University enrollment 
295 

Summer Session: general informa- 
tion 37; committee on 32 

Surgery, Introductory 249 

Suspension 62 



Teachers bureau 72 

Teachers certificates: see Note on 

page 183 
Teacher placement 72 
Teacher training, Committee on 32 
Technicians 20 
Tenure and retirement, Committee on 



Undergraduate requirements for ad- 
mission 42 

Units. Entrance 43 

University Rural High School: build- 
ing 35; staff 23; work of 183 

Upper division, Arts and Sciences 12.3 



Veterans 48 

Violin 258 

Visitors 51 

Vocational agriculture 95 

Vocational home economics 111 

Vocational mining extension 196 

Voice 257 

W 

Welfare, Student 64 
Withdrawal from the University 51 
Womens Hall 35, 41 
Women, Dean of 64 
Women, Living accommodations for 
41 



Textiles and clothing 115 
Theatre 180 
Theory of music 256 
Trophies 80 
Tuition, Rates of 52 



YMCA 67 
YWCA 66 



Zoology 137